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#&%*@^# Caster
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3,058 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Looked in the archives and did not see this combo mentioned.

Thinking the 7/8 is probably right but could see the 8/9 working as well. I am more of a light feel kind of caster so I am leaning towards the 7/8.

Thanks,

-sean
 

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Pullin' Thread
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4,694 Posts
Sean,

I just took look at the line weight data for the XLT and found the 7/8 XLT weighs 876 grains. Since this is very close to the 900 grains of the 7/8 GS, which I really like on the T&T 1409, the 7/8 XLT should be dynamite on it.

The 8/9 XLT weighs in at 988 Grains, which is a bit more and would slow down the rod a bit; although it would not be badly overloaded like with the 8/9 GS and its 1100 grains.

Based on the weights of the lines, you couldn't go wrong with the 7/8 XLT on your 1409 T&T.
 

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149 Posts
Sean,

depending on the how many feet your max. pick-up and deliver, and that is the grain weight you should count for not the whole head weight. For example, if your max. pickup and deliver is 65' out of tip (which direct load the rod) + 14' in the rod (which indirect load the rod) for XLT lines. So the grain weight only count 79' not the whole 90' head. In other words, you have 11 feet head and back tapper sitting on the water to limit your shooting.

Also depending on rod flex., but in general for a long belly line, less grain weight per foot (smaller in diameter on same material) has limitation of carrying energy all the way through to make a positive turn over. wisely line choose will max. your ablity in casting.

Simon ;)
 
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