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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The red shed was good enough to let me demo a new 8 and a new 9 wt xlt. I am still unclear on how long the heads are supposed to be? And, how much they are supposed to weigh. They are about 92' and 97' long and I will try to weigh them at work tomorrow.
 

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#&%*@^# Caster
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Here is what Way sent me as far as specs. I do not think he would mind me sharing:

For the:
7 weight, I have the max diameter at 65 feet, the total head length
at 80 feet, and the total line length at 127 feet.
8 weight, max diameter at 75 feet, head length 90 feet, total line
length of 126 feet
9 weight, max dia. at 82.5 feet, head length at 92.5 feet, total line
length of 127.5 feet
10 weight, max dia. at 90 feet, head length 102.5 feet, line length
140 feet.
No weights but they all come in at the spey standards for weights at 80'.


Hope that helps,

-sean
 

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Junkyard Spey
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Howdy,

There are no gaps in the info. The end of the head is at 75' where it starts tapering to the running line at 95'. The head is weighed at 80' and the target weight is 711grns. This info is exactly as furnished by SA.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I just wanted to know the weight of the entire head on the 8 wt. (Im an engineer, I need to know the specs!) On the 9 wt I can calculate it but there is no data passed 80 feet on the 8 wt. I guessed/estimated and come up with 860 grains for the entire 8 wt head and 950 grains for the entire 9 wt.

Over all these lines are awesome. I can't believe how easy they are to cast.
 

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JD
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data

Being a retired engineer myself, I sympathize with you. Mike the line at five foot entervals. I use Dia sq. x 2160 to determine length per foot for a floating line.

When The XLT lines first came out, they published the weight as well as the length of the entiire head. Now, to conform with the new standards, it seems they only tell you about the first 80 feet. Kind of like the single hand lines. The first 30 feet must conform to the weight standard. But you can do whatever you want with the remaining line and still call it a X wt,,,,based on the weight of the first 30 feet.
 

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loco alto!
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JDJones said:
I use Dia sq. x 2160 to determine length per foot for a floating line.
Using that formula, I can see how one might calculate a length per foot different from 12" ;)

seriously, what is the formula, and what is it calculating? I'm no engineer, just a line geek
 

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JD
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What can I say

SSPey said:
Using that formula, I can see how one might calculate a length per foot different from 12" ;)

seriously, what is the formula, and what is it calculating? I'm no engineer, just a line geek
Wish I knew how to make a keyboard type math.
Diameter multiplied by itself, or diameter times diameter, or diameter squared. However you want to say it. .078x.078 all the same. multiply that by 2160. The answer equals the weight in grains for one foot of line of that diameter. Kapish??? .078x.078x2160=13.14 grains per foot.

Really all you are doing is calulating the weight based on volume and density. Volume being expressed in cubic inches of one foot of line. Density being the specific gravity of the pvc coating, with a little fudge factor thrown in for the core material. So area (dia sq. x .7854) x length (12 inches) x 229 (grains per cubic inch) All of these numbers will remain the same except the diameter. Therefore, .7854 x 12 x 229=2160. That is constant,,,,,or,,,,the magic number. A formula could be derived for any length of line. I just used 1 foot.

It may not be exact. But it's close enough.
 

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Jd

Where did you get the 229 grains/cubic inch? There are different cores being used in the fly lines and different coatings. For the coatings, AirFlo is not PVC. Carron uses a very different core that is very flexible. I do not know if it has the same density as that used by most American manufacturers.
 

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Junkyard Spey
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All you scientist are going to drive the rest of us crazy with all these formulas and numbers.:whoa: :Eyecrazy: :Eyecrazy: :Eyecrazy: :whoa:
Wouldn't it be easier just to get a grain scale and measure the head plus the rear taper.
 

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It's no complicated formula -just Pi * R*2 * 12inches (same as one-quarter Pi *D^2 * 12"). The volume of a cylinder of 1-foot (12") in length. Nothing magic there. Just a simple formula from 9th grade geometry.

The 229 grains per cubic-inch is the mystery though. It's certainly appears to be in the right range (S=0.9) as floating lines are just slightly buoyant enough to float (by the way, Specific gravity and density are not the same thing). The precision of this value for density is undoubtedly much greater than reality, especially if one came to it by throwing in fudge factors, but this really doesn't matter much -other than giving the impression that things are much more exacting than they actually are.

And as far as method presented, one should use the average of the two diameter measurements to determine the individual weights of discreet line segments (5' segments in this example). This will account for any taper present in the line segment. It's only good for a level line as presented by JD. No doubt he knew this. It must be that math-averse keyboard he's got.;)
 

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I read the title and thought "o cool, I love the new XLT's. We are going to talk more about how fun they are to cast!" Wa, wa, waaaa...what is this gobally-guk? Pea brain now hurt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The lines are great! Way should be proud.

It is also great that if d is the distance between diameter measurements then as d approaches zero, the accuracy goes way up!
 

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JD
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zero sq is still zero

A fellow engineer came up with that figure. Like I said, it aint perfect, but it's close. It doesn't work with airflow lines. If I knew how to write an equation on a computer, an easier way would be to figure (level) line weights based on proportions. Aaron, speybum, Has the diameters and weights per foot for level lines (the big stuff) posted on his website.
 

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inglorious 2hander
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Whoa DUDE!

All I want to know is , after reading the formula for rocket fuel to us everyday folks ---Do we need to read the MSDS sheet on XLT's before we can safely fish them ?:lildevl: Should they be regulated by the EPA? Also if more than 10 of those lines end up on the same stretch of river at the same time- would that be considered a hazardous area?:chuckle:
 

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danimal said:
Also if more than 10 of those lines end up on the same stretch of river at the same time- would that be considered a hazardous area?:chuckle:
only if cast by anglers with my skills- or lack there of. :D
 
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