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bigfish
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Just got an islander steelheader centerpin reel and am looking for a reasonably priced rod to go with it until I can come up with the funds to purchase a sage 3113. Any of you gear guys got a rod collecting dust? Also willing to trade my mint meiser 4/5wt switch rod for a higher end rod. Meiser is custom built with top of the line components and jungle cock for lining up the ferrules. Also have a brand new Abel switch reel in rainbow trout graphics if somebody is looking for a reel also.
 

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I think I have just what you need.

Only rod -center pin - (casting wise) that totally 'defeated' me. Never could get the hang of the darned thing. Rod will come with the reel, line, etc. A rod swap would also have a very high 'cool factor.' By the bye, Meiz's shop is about a 10 minute drive from my front door.

PM me.

See you live in 'Delta,' as in BC? My Grand Parents built the first home in the whole area; Aunt Frances was # two or three. Spent my summers with them riding bikes down to the US boarder into Point Roberts. I think the customs guy got sick and tired of seeing the two of us. After a few times through (like as a 7 or 8 year old you have 'identification?) and he'd just wave us on. School days, for the few kids who lived in Pt. Robert's was a total pain in the butt. Bus would pick them up, through the Canadian Boarder, back into the US (Blaine) for school. Back through .. etc., and etc.

At one time it got close to a full on Boarder incident with a new (young) Canadian Custom's fellow. School bus was not allowed to enter. EVERY ONE heard about that (both sides of the Boarder) and young fellow had a quick transfer. There are, or at least were (pre 9/11) the International Boarder was the yellow line down the center of the street. Custom's booth on each end of the street but no one paid a lick of attention. The fence line in a farmers field was the boarder. Boarder guard was a 'horney' bull steer. :eek: Met him once.

Hot summer day, tide out and the bottom sand would really heat up, tide in and was like swimming in a hot tub. Another Aunt owned a Chevron gas station and lots of canned goods for sale .. well she had a hell of a collection of candy jars. Five cents for a 'jaw breaker' the size of a golf ball.

Fun to look back, but God how times have changed. WW2 and lots of German Pris/war in Canada working on farms. The Officers were kept behind barbed wire; many of them really Nazi's to the core. The younger troupes, especially come 1944-1945, were damned glad to be out of it.

'Barbed wire or would you like to work on a farm?' Most took the farm, but few wanted 'Sargent's.' Nut cases not worth the trouble in many cases. I think we had three or four and not a moments problem with any. Related story to me some years later and one we were asked to house was really a surly SOB. 'Papa, my Grandfather:' "The Atlantic Ocean is 1,500 miles that way, the Pacific is 1,500 miles that way. Start walking any time you want."

All of them took their meals at the family table. German was the second family language so good times and "MaMa" really was a hell of a good cook. But, if anything, you did NOT want one of her 'tongue lashings.' I never had one, but I witnessed one. POW had stolen a piece of meat that was to go into the family pot with lots of spubs and garden veggies.

The RCMP picked him up a couple of days later.
 

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But I wonder, but I did grow up in 'interesting times.'

How do you want to do the rod swap?

Fred
 

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Only rod -center pin - (casting wise) that totally 'defeated' me. Never could get the hang of the darned thing. Rod will come with the reel, line, etc. A rod swap would also have a very high 'cool factor.' By the bye, Meiz's shop is about a 10 minute drive from my front door.

PM me.

See you live in 'Delta,' as in BC? My Grand Parents built the first home in the whole area; Aunt Frances was # two or three. Spent my summers with them riding bikes down to the US boarder into Point Roberts. I think the customs guy got sick and tired of seeing the two of us. After a few times through (like as a 7 or 8 year old you have 'identification?) and he'd just wave us on. School days, for the few kids who lived in Pt. Robert's was a total pain in the butt. Bus would pick them up, through the Canadian Boarder, back into the US (Blaine) for school. Back through .. etc., and etc.

At one time it got close to a full on Boarder incident with a new (young) Canadian Custom's fellow. School bus was not allowed to enter. EVERY ONE heard about that (both sides of the Boarder) and young fellow had a quick transfer. There are, or at least were (pre 9/11) the International Boarder was the yellow line down the center of the street. Custom's booth on each end of the street but no one paid a lick of attention. The fence line in a farmers field was the boarder. Boarder guard was a 'horney' bull steer. :eek: Met him once.

Hot summer day, tide out and the bottom sand would really heat up, tide in and was like swimming in a hot tub. Another Aunt owned a Chevron gas station and lots of canned goods for sale .. well she had a hell of a collection of candy jars. Five cents for a 'jaw breaker' the size of a golf ball.

Fun to look back, but God how times have changed. WW2 and lots of German Pris/war in Canada working on farms. The Officers were kept behind barbed wire; many of them really Nazi's to the core. The younger troupes, especially come 1944-1945, were damned glad to be out of it.

'Barbed wire or would you like to work on a farm?' Most took the farm, but few wanted 'Sargent's.' Nut cases not worth the trouble in many cases. I think we had three or four and not a moments problem with any. Related story to me some years later and one we were asked to house was really a surly SOB. 'Papa, my Grandfather:' "The Atlantic Ocean is 1,500 miles that way, the Pacific is 1,500 miles that way. Start walking any time you want."

All of them took their meals at the family table. German was the second family language so good times and "MaMa" really was a hell of a good cook. But, if anything, you did NOT want one of her 'tongue lashings.' I never had one, but I witnessed one. POW had stolen a piece of meat that was to go into the family pot with lots of spubs and garden veggies.

The RCMP picked him up a couple of days later.
Great first hand account, Fred...not one I've heard before. Thanks for sharing.
 
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