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Discussion Starter #1
So I know most winter trout Spey tactics involve using a skagit head to get the flies down deep. I really enjoy touch and go casting with scandi setups and want to fish exclusively that way. I do use polyleaders in the winter but I feel they hinder the motion of the leader. I see those that use scandi lines for salmon use triple density lines with mono leaders so the touch and go technique is still nice and smooth.

Problem is I can’t find any 3D scandi lines that would fit the grain window of a trout spey rod. Thoughts?
 

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BULL DOG!!!!
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I fish floaters all year. At worst I might go with a light poly leader but your winter might be colder than ours :)
 
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Meiser, T&T, and OPST two handers; Scott, Orvis, & Winston SH. Danielsson and Hardy Reels
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Call Steve Godshall and have him build you one. Also you can consider the OPST heads with some of the sink tips. It can be cast almost like a regular Scandi head. And, Barrio offers a GT90 in a full intermediate that works nicely with a sinking poly leader. Google Barrio Fly Lines and see the variety offered.
 

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So far i don't have a use for a 3D line, but if I were in your shoes...

For a factory line... Rio Single Hand Spey 3D. For full floating lines you bump up by 3 sizes (Ex- 3wt TH rod matches with a 6wt SH line). I would do some research about how the 3-bump rule may or may not apply to sinking lines. I've read that sinking lines can be lighter than a full floater due to thinner line diameter, therefore less wind resistance. I have no idea if this is relevant to trout size stuff.

Or... According to one other SP member... DIY using a light and short skagit head as a driver, an intermediate tip, and a faster sinking poly. This allows maximum versatility. You can vary sink rates of the tip and poly independently. I've read that this works well on heavier (salmon) outfits, but I have no idea how a trout spey rod would do. It would probably take some trial and error to get your setup tuned nicely. You also have to be ok with all the loop to loop connections.

Or... Just call Steve Godshall and have one built that will be exactly what you need/want.

Good luck! Let us know what you go with and how it works!
 

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Sounds like a skandit line from Steve Godshall would work. Essentially a fat scandi with interchangeable tips- it would only be 2D, but probably fit the bill.
 

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Broken Down Spey Freak
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I think it comes down to how deep you need to fish and water temps. Like Bruce I mostly keep to dry lines. A moderately weighted fly and/or light poly if I need a bit of depth. I'm not fishing deep holes here but there are some trenches that can get down several feet. Most of what I have here are broad pools or long skinny runs.

Dan
 

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Leaking Wader
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I was looking for light sinking Scandi line in NZ but couldn't find any, so I have been getting them from overseas. There are few options available from Guideline depending on grain weight and length of line you are looking for. There are also Scientific Anglers Atlantic Salmon Short line available in Japan. Good luck!
 

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AJS Reels
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Guideline

I can vouch for the Guideline ULS 3D plus lines, they are in perfect weights for trout speys.
Have the 5/6 single hand head at 216 grains, length at 19'7" S2/4/6 nice match on a 10'6" light trout spey stick.
 

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Build yourself and you get better than you can buy. For example 10ft of T8 as belly and 10ft fast sink polyleader as tip you have 20ft about 120...130gr head which Scandi cast quite smooth using 12ft mono leader and should be light enough for lightest trout Speys and sinks fast.

3D heads which tip sinks fast (S5 and faster) have poor weight distrubution for Spey.

Esa
 

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Too far away
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124 Posts
Hello Stravic,
I do a lot of winter fishing for trouts and after all, I went away from sinking lines. Because they were not available in trout Spey spectrum, I was experimenting years.
After all, I would assume, you won’t get the expected benefit in numbers of catches using sinking lines for trouts. I am talking about river fishing.

I for myself go that far to use a Scandi floating Belly with an Intermediate tip for trouts most of the time now, adapted with a long tapered leader, seldom a Polyleader and even more seldom a Skagit and heavy sinktips. The latter only for the heaviest and biggest flies in windy conditions in spring.

Reasons why:
-Grace of Scandi, grace of tapered long leader spooks less trouts. They are mostly more „educated“ than our beloved searunning species, especially in c&r water or places with high fishing pressure.
-Adapting depth with weight of the fly on a long Mono leader after an Intermediate tip is not that much less effective in achieving depth, compared to unweighted/weighted flies on a sinking line, heavier sinktips or sinking Polyleader with too short tippets.
-It’s astonishing, what size and weight of flies can be turned over with a Scandi, well adapted in rod and line pairing and how quick a change to a soft hackle is done.
-Trouts want/need speed, also in winter, especially the experienced and bigger ones. Much better versatility, to speed up with a floating line/floating Belly or to do the opposite, to slow down and let the fly go down on a long Mono leader, then quick change again, depending on situation and tactics.
-We can use „fishy“ Spey rod actions with more feel in the Trout Spey game, where possible.
-More fun in casting and fishing compared to a „cast the sinker and let it to itself“.

My biggest trouts in winter:
Caught in flat and fast water near the bank on a high speed fly in a retrieve, fishing for Danube Salmon (hucho hucho). Trouts in sizes that were thought to be in the deepest pools...
But maybe your trouts are different and I would do it totally wrong over there...
 
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