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Which WindCutter with tips is better for Scott ARC-1509-4: 8/9/10 or 9/10/11
As a floater I am using Rio MidSpey 8/9.

Thanks
Martin
 

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I have the AIRFLO Delta 9/10 that handles nicely on the rod - it is 630 grains. The WC 8/9/10 is 585 grains and the 9/10/11 is 650 grains. If you like to feel the rod load I would opt for the heavier line especially if using it for tips - the heavier floating line may help. But if you prefer a lighter feel (as RIO indicates type A or B) then go with the lighter line
 

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Hi Martin,

I fish the 1509 with the medspey8/9 for a dry line as well. When I fish tips on it I go to the 9-10-11 windcutter. I cast the two set ups with different strokes but I like the heavier deeper loading you get with the bigger line for tips. I fished this last week with the 1509 rigged up with a big boy 300 and it handles it very well.

Cheers,

Greg
 

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Hey Martin

I agree with Greg on the windcutter 9/10/11 for your tip work. However you really should try the 7/8 mid for your dry line work. The 1509 is my very first true love with the 15'ers.. The rod will do anything you can think of doing with say three other rods. It can go lite, heavy,slow, fast....you can fish it all day and it won't wear you out. you can fish it close or long it doesn't seem to mind. Anywho you have what I think is a great blue collar, work all day rod, for whatever thats worth.


Good luck Tom
 

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Mr. Mom
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I used to own that rod, and still own the 1510. It's all personal preference, but I would go with the 9/10/11 for winter fishing with tips. I'm not interested in throwing tight little loops with tips and big flies because it just doesn't work. a slower stroke throughout the cast and more mass helps a controlled larger, but still powerful U shaped loop power intruders and giant waddington prawns as far as I need to fish them.

I have long thought the rio recommendations should say "A" is for advanced casters who like a faster feeling rod AND dry line applications, and "B" is for less skilled casters and Sinktip work...
 

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Mr. Mom
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with a six inch waddington prawn or 2 inch heavily dressed brass tube? Well, to quote George Cook "Gravity never seems to go away in this world..."

With all but the biggest flies, the casts work great up until I start the forward stroke, then any number of things happen. I have to hit the cast much harder and time it better than I do with the heavier line. Most common fault is the loop hitting itself or the fly hitting the line 30 to 40 feet out from my position, and not just due to forcing the cast, but also due to the big nasty on the end of the line having a less than smooth trajectory, which is natural and easily avoidable with a larger rounded loop. Next most common is the fly not leaving the water cleanly, resulting a loss of energy in the cast and a piled up tip and fly at the end of the cast.

With the biggest flies the Heavier line definitely makes bringing the tip and fly to the surface easier resulting in more consistent set up for the double and single. Doesn't matter that much with the snapper, as you can always put some mustard on the snap, but of course the fly may enter the water above you like a golf ball :biggrin:
 

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Mr. Mom
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peter-s-c said:
The reason I asked the question relates back to a problem I had with T-8 tip turnover. Without the line coming up hard on the reel, tight loops didn't turn over on the WC 7/8/9 while big, open ones did. (
I'm sure I don't know the answer, but here are some WAGs. How easy is it for energy to flow around a pointy wedge versus a rounded shape if they are both the same heigth? I'm not talking about efficiency in terms of moving forward/distance, but just the flow of energy around the two shapes. The difference between shooting the line a long distance vs. pulling a big clunky fly along... Could higher line speed/energy resulting in distance be more suited to wedge versus lower speed/energy resulting in towing power be more suited to rounded?
 

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A couple of thoughts, loops and wind

I fish sinktips, sometimes weighted flies or added lead, and usually have to deal with wind. To me the answer is in the middle...too wide to tail but no more than necessary.

I'm looking at both loop shape and the effect of wind-
1) To me, the line density/diameter issue is a big one. When dealing with wind, I do try to tighten my loops, but there is a point of diminishing returns. A more dense/smaller diameter line is more tolerant of wider loops because it is less affected by wind. In the earlier thread on wind there were comments about the easier fishing with shorter head lines in wind. Less total wind resistance.
2) I think there is a "line" (floater/tip/mono/etc) taper factor that is very important. A good taper is less sensitive to loop shape and turnover issues when the taper is steep enough to store enough extra energy to successfully beat the extra resistance of wind or more open loop. The Windcutter concept, as well as the root of Pike tapers.
3) The tighter the loop, the faster it has to go to turn over before it collapses--more vulnerable to gravity. I notice this particularly with dense sinktips, which seem to do best with a little more open loop than the tighter pointy one.
4)Fly and/or leader weight is a definite factor. Weight that is concentrated in one spot just doesn't work with tight loops, as it wants to travel in a straight line. It loses energy and often crashes into the loop, tailing into the water. To use weighted flies effectively, loops have to be bigger, and the taper comment above applies even more.
Nice topic!
Carl
 
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