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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Eagerly awaiting my Norway 13´ 7/9 and can´t make my mind up which full floater to choose. I´ll use this outfit mainly in the summer, with longish leaders and smallish flies (say doubles in sizes 6-10, small coneheads). In september I´ll use it for sea trout on the Mörrum casting bigger and bulkier flies (for example Temple Dogs with 7-8 cm wings). I´ll seldom need to cast further than 25 yards but I´ll do a lot of snake rolls and snap-T:s. Tight spots? You bet.

Love the Windcutter but I´m always open to new stuff.

(I know that there has been written loads about these lines and though I´ve scrolled most of it I still want to toss this one out.) :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Ok, so I guess you people are busy working or whatever ;) I´ll reason with myself, hehe.

Thanks! to Peter for the comprehensive weight chart:
head lenght head weight
SA Short Head 8/9 51,3 ft/15,4 m 650 grains/42 grams
Rio windcutter 8-10 54,5 ft/16,3 m 686 grains/44,5 grams

From what I gather above the 8/9 Short Head is comparable to the 8-10 Windcutter. The latter is somewhat heavier but on the other hand slightly longer, so I guess the SA will feel a little heavier and quicker loading. I´ve read in post about the great turning over capacities of the SA- might come in handy when fishing big flies for sea trout. The WC might present the fly better. However I think that a 18-20´ leader in front of the SA will present say a size 10 double nicely enough if you use a slow and nice stroke.

The SA is nearly 1 meter shorter. Probably means that it works slightly better in confined spaces.

I guess the Short Head has the AST coating? If so, that speaks in favor of the SA.

One question though: Is the Short Head equally good at "speciality" casts, like snakes and snap t:s?

/Fredrik
 

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Sa/wc

I dont have much experience with the SA short but I have WC's in a number of different WT's for different rods. So far I have no complaints with them at all. They seem to be an excellent all around short head line. They work fine at both casting tips as well as a straight floating line. The new version of the WC is even better with the new taper. Love this line. Also it does work extremely well with snap T, circle, and double spey casts. No complaints there. I have not found a suitable replacement for the WC when it comes to short compact heads and spey/skagit casting. But I am looking forward to trying some of the new skagit lines when they become available :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for your replies, guys!

Oooops, made a mistake while reading Peter´s chart! The Windcutter 8-10 weighs 585 grains and not 685 grains. That means that the *equivalent* SA Short Head is the 7/8 at 550 grains and not the 8/9 at 650 grains. (The reason I use the WC 8-10 as a yardstick is that Scottish spey guru Ian Neale recommended that line for the Norway 13´. Might as well stick with the WC!) I think that Dana also recommended stepping down one size when using the SA Short Head, for example matching an 8/9 line with a 9/10 rod. The Norway is really an 8/9 so a 7/8 Short Head makes sense.

I´m just wondering if the 7/8 SA Short head will cope with those Temple Dogs?

Anyone?
 

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I think you would be happy with the SA short in 7/8. They turn over with authority. They work extremely well with a underhand style of casting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The 7/8 Short Head is only 49 ft which puts it *dangerously* close to my shooting heads in length. Oh heck, I´m getting the 8-10 Windcutter. I know I like those and I´m curious about the new tapers.

So there you go.

thanks for your time, guys! :)
 

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Sorry to chime in so late

The Windcutter lines have a finer front taper that allow for more delicate presentations, the SA Short is like a shooting head in that is has an abrupt forward taper and really is best for turning over heavy flies or poly leaders. You mentioned small flies, I'd go with the Windcutter. However, the short head could be smoothed out with poly's and would then allow for a more diverse use (floating to X-fast sinking with the change of a tip). It would still be a little harsh for fine floating presentations though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks Moose

Moose said:
The Windcutter lines have a finer front taper that allow for more delicate presentations, the SA Short is like a shooting head in that is has an abrupt forward taper and really is best for turning over heavy flies or poly leaders. You mentioned small flies, I'd go with the Windcutter. However, the short head could be smoothed out with poly's and would then allow for a more diverse use (floating to X-fast sinking with the change of a tip). It would still be a little harsh for fine floating presentations though.
Yeah, I´ll use the WC for summer fishing and spare the shooting heads for fall sea trout fishing.

It might seem strange that in Sweden we use big and bulky flies for sea trout, since the tradition in Norway and Britian leans towards smaller flies. The reason is that the rivers in southern Sweden are pretty deep and dark. The huge Mörrum River and Em River sea trout are easily spooked so the *only* chance to get them to take is during dusk and night. That combined with the dark and deep pools explains the big (but not heavy) flies. For those few interested. :hihi:
 
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