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Drags are for Sissys
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Was out fishing the other day and a local river rat - (pinner turned spey geek )asked me how he should he should handle a wind blowing straight at him in the face; and how he should cast if he had a wind blowing straight at him from behind. Didn't have much of an answer at the time but here is how I'm guessing it should be handled assuming the caster is facing his target.

Face on Wind: The D Loop formation will be super charged by the wind. “Sail filled by the wind analogy comes to mind”. The caster should temper the wind formed D Loop by sweeping back with less power else there could be problems forming an anchor, additionally the forward cast power applied by the caster should be applied slowly and smoothly accelerated to avoid tailing loops since the wind assisted D Loop will tend to load the rod more than "normal" (read- practice very good form in the forward cast). Some reduction in distance is typically noticed with wind in the face situations. If the wind is so heavy that an anchor can't be formed (could skip or not land at all in heavy wind) its time to go home and tie flies.

Wind from Directly Behind: The D Loop formation will tend to be retarded by the wind trying to blow the D loop down. Pay particular attention to the anchor size, a little more lift may be needed at stop at the key position to lessen a larger anchor grip from the slumping D Loop. Typically no need to apply a lot more power into the sweep for the D Loop because loss in power from a smaller/shallower D loop will be gained back as the wind blows the forward cast out. If the wind is so heavy that a reasonably small sized anchor can't formed (heavy wind could blow down any/all D loops) its time to go home and tie flies.

IS this the correct text book way to handle these situations?
 

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Dedicated Fisherman
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Hi Wayne,

I can't say whether or not your solution is 'text book' but it sounds a lot like what I unconsciously do in the same situations. The part where you said time to go home and tie flies rang a bell with me :) A few years ago I was at a large creek right where it dumps into the Inlet. Plan was there were pink salmon coming in and I was there to have some fun. The wind was coming off the ocean with no general direction. Sometimes in your face and then changing to my right and then swirling from the right rear. I'm a right hand caster and it was really tough to put a cast out. The water was chop and the sun was to my front right. Between the wind - the chop and the dancing glare coming off the tips of all the little waves I was helpless to cast. I've never hooked myself with a fly but this was the perfect situation for it to happen. As you suggested, this was a time when I just reeled it in and walked to the truck..........

There are times and conditions when we just have to admit that things just aren't conducive to fly fishing and pack it up. If the conditions haven't reached the impossible stage you sound like you have it figured out, and knowing when to go tie some flies rounds out your thinking.

Ard
 

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Shooting line when casting to headwind can cause line loop widening and it kills the cast but when line is hold tight the rod leg of line loop stays tight and line loop straightens better. Head wind keeps D-loop tight so slightly more overhang can be used to increase casting stroke and make line loop narrower and lengthen cast as well.

Esa
 

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Sounds good to me. Wind direction can also be the difference between upstream-anchor casts (head-on wind) and casts done from a downstream-anchor (wind at your back.) I don't like casting across the body but "cack-handed" maybe easier for the beginner to learn.
 

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in head wind situations it often helps to keep the rod plane low - even parallel to the water and try to cast under the wind - similar to trying to cast under low overhanging trees on the far bank. Do agree on letting up on D loop and smooth forward cast but the smooth is something that helps under all conditions but you will want to give a very definite stop at the end of the forward stroke with rod tip low
 

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JD
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Wind

If you're local, tying flies vs fishing may not be too bad a hit. However, when one has invested big bucks & traveled considerable distance to arrive at a "fly fishing destination" (Tiera del Fuego) aquessing to the wind to sit in a lodge and tie flies is not an option. Faced with such adverse conditions, one learns to deal with the wind. It's not always pretty, but at least you're still fishing.

Sustained anchor casts, really sustained, allowing ample time for a sink tip to dig in, along with optimum anchor placement, assures against blowing your anchor on a powerful cast. Side arm casts, tight loops, high line speed, driving the cast under the wind is the name of the game. Persevere, figure out ways to use the wind to your advantage. Accept the fact that you may lose some distance. Tie your hat down & keep on fishing. :chuckle:
 

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AW: Futterpflanzen oder nicht

I was at a large creek right where it dumps into the Inlet. Plan was there were pink salmon coming in and I was there to have some fun. The wind was coming off the ocean with no general direction. Sometimes in your face and then changing to my right and then swirling from the right rear. I'm a right hand caster and it was really tough to put a cast out. The water was chop and the sun was to my front right
 

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wind from the "wrong side"

RULE 1. Don't try to cast over your rt shoulder if the wind is on your right shoulder. That is how to get a hook somewhere in your upper body or head. Learn to cast off both shoulders. Regardless of your dominant arm you can learn how to cast with your other arm, or you can learn how to cast cackhanded, with your dominant hand . It can be a very powerful cast!!!
 

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What helps me the most is keeping all aspects as close the water as possible. With my heavier rods and lines, I can still blast things out, but the wind can move the leader and fly several yards from the intended zone. If everything unwinds and only has to fall a foot or so to the surface wind carry is essentially eliminated.
 
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