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I have been fishing a long time and have never reeled with my right hand...and I can’t see why a right handed person would...so why are 90% of the Rees on Spinoza RHW?
 

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The Skeena in the fall
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Because I think in the early days all reels were predominantly right handed?

I think most of us started with bait-casting and spinning reels which in my memory were mostly right handed so that's what we learned as kids.
Then as we grew up, left bait and spoon fishing behind, we moved to right handed fly reels.
So perhaps vintage reel manufacturers made mostly in right handed versions due to tradition.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Because I think in the early days all reels were predominantly right handed?

I think most of us started with bait-casting and spinning reels which in my memory were mostly right handed so that's what we learned as kids.
Then as we grew up, left bait and spoon fishing behind, we moved to right handed fly reels.
So perhaps vintage reel manufacturers made mostly in right handed versions due to tradition.
That’s weird. I don’t get why they were right handed back then...did people learn to cast with their left hand? Or did they always switch hands from casting to reeling? I noticed all the old Hardy’s are RHW, but I just figured that was the English being difficult...like the whole left hand driving thing.
 

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I have been fishing a long time and have never reeled with my right hand...and I can’t see why a right handed person would...so why are 90% of the Rees on Spinoza RHW?
im the same way, but what i have come to accept/think is, when a right hand dominate, like myself, is holding the rod, it is at rest at their right side/hip on the swing, so when a fish grabs and starts the game, that the reel handle starts spinning before you can react, so having the handle on the outside, RHW, it allows for less fouling by catching your body/clothes etc, but i still will always have my reels LHW and keep them at a slight angle when i think that take will come😁
 

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The Skeena in the fall
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That’s weird. I don’t get why they were right handed back then...did people learn to cast with their left hand? Or did they always switch hands from casting to reeling? I noticed all the old Hardy’s are RHW, but I just figured that was the English being difficult...like the whole left hand driving thing.
Weird it may be but I can't play a fish properly with the rod in my right hand.
50 years of the rod in my left and palming with my right is the only thing that feels right.
 

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There are some advantages to a RHW retrieve reel, if you can get used to it.....the handle and knob are outta the way while swinging and won't get caught on pockets or clothing. Also the placement of the handle will help avoid "knuckle busters" when a hot fish takes off. Takes some time to get used to it but I made the switch on all spey reels and I'm glad I did.

Added advantage is that vintage reels will become an option as most are RHW!
 

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Trout reels are usually set up left handed by manufacturers as anglers want the rod in their dominate hand which is statistically right hand. As some wag once set you don't really need a reel for most trout just put the line in your pocket. At one time there was a raging controversy for salt water species such as tarpon tuna etc whether your retrieve on reels should be set up for dominant hand I.E right hand dominant go right hand retrieve. Lefty Kreh proved that you can take up fly line way faster with dominant hand much needed when a tarpon decides to warp speed back to your flats boat. However, the best advice I ever got was in OZ "wind with the hand that whips skippy"
 

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As a left handed human being I think there is a much simpler explanation for this. Waaay back in the old days it wasn’t really acceptable to be a left hand dominate person and most lefty’s were forced to write with there right hand in school. I think basically it was thought that the act of reeling with your right and and casting off your right was just the right way to do things. No idea why society was like that but I’m will to bet is had something to do with religion.
 

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Some great responses here. The right hand wind was big in european fishing. The thought being you could reel faster with a dominate, especially when a salmon was coming right towards you.. Reels by hardy were right hand wind only back then . Thus it was heavily involved in salmon fishing and got passed down. still big to this day. The reel Maker bo mohlin in sweden makes a lot of right wind ( he's hard to get a hold of and whenever i did. He's only got right handers ready to go lol, there's more to it but i digress). People who ordered from u.s makers like bogdan,godfrey,vom hofe etc from europe often got right hand wind. Thus they eventually ended up on the second hand market and u.s customers don't buy them as much. Thus you see them lingering around more often. A left hand reel might even fetch a higher price

Ever wonder why you don't see to many people fishing doubles or trebles for steelhead and pacifc salmon? Even back in the day or in the great lakes? I don't think its for eithics. especially in the great lakes
Might be off topic but its crazy how i don't see europeans indictor nymphing for salmon like ever. Over here most anglers use indictors according to some surveys... In a way its kinda one good thing we avoided (no offense my nymphing friends, just tough to swing in rotation and cover water when many of you are around)
 

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Discussion Starter #14
As a left handed human being I think there is a much simpler explanation for this. Waaay back in the old days it wasn’t really acceptable to be a left hand dominate person and most lefty’s were forced to write with there right hand in school. I think basically it was thought that the act of reeling with your right and and casting off your right was just the right way to do things. No idea why society was like that but I’m will to bet is had something to do with religion.
Well, left handedness has been codified as bad in our language even. “Sinister” means left in Latin. And “gauche” As in clumsy or unfashionable means left in French. Even in Spanish “straight” is the same word as right more or less. They probably have a way of putting down southpaws too. Religion aside, there has been a
GlobAl anti-left-hand conspiracy. Just ask Ned Flanders.
Actually, it would not surprise me if there was a European aversion to anything being left handed....”that’s the way it has always been done” is a really common explanation for things that don’t make a lot of sense.
 

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Broken Down Spey Freak
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I've been switching my reels to right hand wind just to avoid interference with the handle. It took about 3 seconds to adapt but I prefer it now. I still have a reel or two that I haven't change and it throws me off at first when I use them.
 

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Well, left handedness has been codified as bad in our language even. “Sinister” means left in Latin. And “gauche” As in clumsy or unfashionable means left in French. Even in Spanish “straight” is the same word as right more or less. They probably have a way of putting down southpaws too. Religion aside, there has been a
GlobAl anti-left-hand conspiracy. Just ask Ned Flanders.
Actually, it would not surprise me if there was a European aversion to anything being left handed....”that’s the way it has always been done” is a really common explanation for things that don’t make a lot of sense.
sure wish we had a left hand emporium around here! 😂😂
 

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I'm left handed.
I cast right handed which allows me to pull with my dominate hand. I reel left handed again with my dominate hand.
Right handers cast with right hand up and pull with their weaker hand, then switch the rod so they can reel with their dominate hand.
Makes no sense to me.
I'm sure some of you can cast either way, but at my age I'd have to stop to remember where the reel handle is.
Since only about 7 to 10% of the world is left handed they make reels to fit the majority.
 

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My dominant hand will always be used for the rod, line and fighting, because that's where I want the strength and sensitivity to feel the fish's moves. Modern large-arbor reels almost eliminate the need to dedicate your dominant for quick furious winding.

handle getting caught in your clothing? Just get a longer rod to balance during the swing having the reel floating out behind your body. Palming can be done either side just as easily, and during a long fight, you can always switch a bit to give either arm a break.
Only ever rapped my knuckles once on a hot fish, and then never again because ouch-learning works. Knuckle busters can happen with a right-hand hovering close to the handle too.

I'll stick to LHW it makes the most sense to me.
 

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I was discussing this recently on the river, and my fishing associate, who always beckons back to his fly shop/guide days, and is always undoubtedly sure of his answers, rather they are correct or not, said it was because before two-handers, single-handed casters trout fishing preferred reeling with the same hand that they cast with because they didn't want to tire out that hand fighting fish. So, cast with the right, reel with the right, hold the cork during the fight with the left and you'll tire out your non-casting hand instead of your casting hand. It just carried over with time, presumably. I guess there's some logic there.

I don't know why anyone would use this reasoning with a two-hander and steelhead/salmon/etc., seeing that both fighting and reeling hands probably get an equal workout on a direct-drive 1:1 reel.

This might be something an old-timer can confirm or deny, as I cannot, and neither can my source.
 
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