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This summer and fall, I've become completely absorbed by the single spey and have been practicing like mad and have been using it nearly 100% of the time when fishing a dry line. I've been on the lookout for others using the single so I could watch and learn. However, I've seen NOBODY using the single. Going back all the years I've been using a 2-hander (since 1997), I can't recall seeing anyone using the single as a fishing cast in and around Washington and Oregon states. Maybe I've been extremely unobservant. I've been researching Speypages for technique tips and ran across the poll "Favorite casts with a long line." 140 people responded and the most, 55%, said that the single was their favorite. I know members of the forum from anywhere in the world can respond so I understand the poll results may not match my informal observations on the river. Also, the poll may not reflect the practice of NW fishermen, many of whom are using shorter heads. (I'm assuming that long lines meant midspey and longer.) I usually see snap Ts, circle speys, and double speys. On occasion, I see snake rolls and the odd Perry Poke. But never a single. Does my observations match those of other 2-handers from Northern California to Canada and Alaska? I'll not likely part ways with shorter heads and casts associated with them for winter and spring, but man I can't believe I've denied myself the pleasure of unrolling a single all these years in summer and fall.
 

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In the summer and early fall when using floating lines, I use the single spey exclusively with a mid-belly line ( RIO midspey (7 weight only) or Carron 75'), depending on the river. The exception being with a downstream wind - then I use a snake-roll exclusively.
In the winter when using heavy tips, I use a snake- roll with a RIO windcutter; unless there is an upstream wind, then I use a spiral-single or a spiral - dump and poke.
On a recent trip to TdF, when using a skagit-line with 400g and 500g RIO BBs, with a constant downstream wind on river left, I used a roll-cast following by a snake-roll or a double-spey. 95% of the time a used the roll-cast and snake.
 

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I used it a lot on a Dean riv trip.Known as more of a dry line cast[even Simon says that},I used it with big fly a type 8 sinktip and skagit line.I set it as my goal this year.As a result I tuned in to a few demos[Simon,Hogan]and Mike McCune gave me an important pointer.Amazing how much more you get from a clave if you set goals for the year prior to attending.It is extremely efficient and relaxing to use once you dial it in.I plan to continue to use it more and more[You hear that Willie Gun?]I found it to really work great on Bob Clay's bamboo spey rod!!Beau
 

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floating line i ise the single spey almost exclusively it sets me up right for my downstream angle.. I hate casting straight across stream mending then waiting to start my swing!!! i sometimes to a snake roll but for a floating line it's nearly all single spey regardless of what side of the river or wind conditions. if the wind is wrong i just duck :)
 

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Haunted by the Hunt
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when i'm on river right and depending on the wind, that is the only cast i use. when on river left, i use the snap-t. i can't seem to throw a single spey with the right shoulder. need to stick with it, practice it and stop bailing out to the snap-t when i'm struggling with the single spey.

Mike
 

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Coast2coast Flyfishaholic
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For upriver wind or no wind I fish single spey unless the conditions or line configuration compromises the fishing, then I will switch to a snap or skagit stuff out of necessity.

Sink tips by themselves don't force the change, but cramped space, turbulent water surfaces, and extended belly lines modified with high density heads, etc may force the issue.

The 54-65 ft heads with tips single spey quite easily with high-density tips if the lift and load is patient and the equipment right for the task.

I find that even tournament length floating heads single spey with far less effort (albeit more practice) than a snap-T. Touch and go.

.02
 

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For summer fishing, I use the single the vast majority of the time. I still struggle with big changes of direction, so when needed I might change to a snake roll or toss in a poke. But the single is so efficient, for both ease of casting and saving time, that I can't imagine not using it regularly.

--Bill
 

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The key to consistency for me was;lift up.then towards the bank briefly and then back out toward the river.All in a smooth graceful way.Prior to that,I used to break the fly free of the water and try to do everthing after that.Meant it took more muscle and depending on the water was inconsistent.Now I do the up ,in,out and that, in combination, breaks the fly free. The back out, although gentle, puts a curve in there that accelerated the lift out without me accelerating my hands.Kind of like the Al Bhur method of getting load off of the line in the air with a change of direction.Makes it all silky smooth and controlled and consistent anchor placement.Beau
 

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Steelhead are cool!
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I use a single alot of the time. River left or right and depending on wind direction of course.
 

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not as gullible as most
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It's a myth, I would never use it.

The single Spey rules. It works with any length line, sunk, dry, fried or barbecued...but it doesn't really, I mean really exist outside of Scotland. It succumbed some time during the Second War of Speyfficiency...just prior to the Holy Hand Grenade incident, roughly about the same time double handers became "spey" rods.

Ever seen a clip on here of anyone performing a single Spey with a longbelly using more than a few degrees of change who was not Scottish or who had not spent a fair amount of time there? Ever wonder why that might be? :saevilw:

So do I.

The single Spey: it can be done in any wind, with any length of line, wet or dry. Accept no substitutes.

Zo2
 

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what i want to know is>

does the anchor dictate if it's a syngel spay or not?,:D ,fishing with a gent who just aquired a two-hander,,i lent a line as we shared a run and of course made several casts with his stick:) ,anchoring all over,in front,to the side,behind me,,then i said to him=witch one was a `single-spey' cast?,,PROPER of course!:hihi: i say just fish and be happy you made it there no matter what casts you're doing,,now i do recall coming downriver in my drifter a month ago,,one guy was slinging line like a madman,doing all sorts of casts amid many `bait' anglers,,not leaving the bug `down' at all,,i guess he was `working out' but,,`driving' by,,i felt he made `spey' look stupid to the masses,,simply because he was flinging line with no fishing included(yes,he did some awesome casts,,but,add a sinktip on there and lets FISH IT!)get what i mean?,,i guess you'd have to have been there drifting by and seeing it of course but,,,,,,,,,,;) ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,translation is;,,single speycast!???,,i do!:saevilw:
 

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Zo2
That was pretty good!!! And two a certain degree you are correct, not many folks using the single spey while fishing atleast not when I am on the river to see them. The single is probably one of the best casts to use while fishing if the wind is in your favor as it is the quickest way to get the fly out and fishing again. And I am learning that you can still perform a decent change of direction in a down stream wind by modifying the cast.
 

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not as gullible as most
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...

Thanks, Brian.

Yep, on a nice crisp single the fly is out of the water maybe three to four seconds, max. I don't see many using it either, really is a pity. Why that is, I haven't a clue.

Surely does seem to work in adverse winds with a little more kick to them than those "light airs" Falkus wrote about.

Michael
 

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maybe i'm part scottish but i use it almost exclusivly. i researched and studied for about four years, and to me the doublehanded rod is all about efficiency, so it's the single and the snake roll 99% of the time. here in the GL i have had people i don't know ask me what cast is that? apparently it has gotton some sort of bad rep for teaching beginners. i found it easy to teach as a next step from the switch cast with the addition of the hip rotation. efficiency is the goal and the snake and the single are by far the quickest and most effiecint so why not use them? the double replaces the snake when i'm doing a lot of weight but the single holds it's place in the lineup regardless. after spending 100 hrs each of the past two summers throwing a single one direction and the snake the other durring practice they are now like old friends. btw most of my studying and research was on scottish casting so that may explain some of it, it's all in what you learn and what becomes comfortable. my long winded .02.
 

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I never see the Single Spey used where I fish, N Ca and SW Oregon

cnaka said:
This summer and fall, I've become completely absorbed by the single spey and have been practicing like mad and have been using it nearly 100% of the time when fishing a dry line. I've been on the lookout for others using the single so I could watch and learn. However, I've seen NOBODY using the single. Going back all the years I've been using a 2-hander (since 1997), I can't recall seeing anyone using the single as a fishing cast in and around Washington and Oregon states. Maybe I've been extremely unobservant. I've been researching Speypages for technique tips and ran across the poll "Favorite casts with a long line." 140 people responded and the most, 55%, said that the single was their favorite. I know members of the forum from anywhere in the world can respond so I understand the poll results may not match my informal observations on the river. Also, the poll may not reflect the practice of NW fishermen, many of whom are using shorter heads. (I'm assuming that long lines meant midspey and longer.) I usually see snap Ts, circle speys, and double speys. On occasion, I see snake rolls and the odd Perry Poke. But never a single. Does my observations match those of other 2-handers from Northern California to Canada and Alaska? I'll not likely part ways with shorter heads and casts associated with them for winter and spring, but man I can't believe I've denied myself the pleasure of unrolling a single all these years in summer and fall.
I never see the Single Spey used where I fish, N Ca and SW Oregon, basically Perry Pokes, circle casts, double speys and recently Skagit Casts.

Due to multiple shoulder injuries, I can't lift my right shoulder to due a Single Spey with my right hand up. However, last week while trying my old 7136 with an OB 11 W Floater, I tried a few singles with my left hand high, and I surprised myself in a good way. Part of the problem in my area is the over abundance of trees/brush limiting a high lift of the rod and any real D loop behind me. So I go to the Skagits, Pokes and some type circle cast set up.
 

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Your reply brings up a nagging question with other casts

roballen said:
floating line i ise the single spey almost exclusively it sets me up right for my downstream angle.. I hate casting straight across stream mending then waiting to start my swing!!! i sometimes to a snake roll but for a floating line it's nearly all single spey regardless of what side of the river or wind conditions. if the wind is wrong i just duck :)
Thanks for posting this reply. The past year or so, I have had a nagging question re any cast that goes straight out with a sinking or intermediate fly and even a dry fly.

Are we basically wasting our time and having fun casting with the casts which go straight out? If we don't get a fish when the fly lands, is the fly drifting downstream too fast or whatever until it gets to the dangle?

It seems to me that unless I get an immediate strike when my fly hits straight across, I could take a nap until the dangle with steelhead, big trout and even small mouth bass. It is worse with the Grand Spey and Carron lines with nice long casts that look great and do nothing after the splash until the dangle.

My nagging feeling is to go to that downstream angle stat and forget the rest of the water.

I would appreciate input from the real fishers with the long lines and rods.
 

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I have said this so many times you guys are probably going to go to sleep on this.I cast straight across most of the time.I hook a ton of fish between splashdown and where most guys get splashdown.My fly is fishing way before most angle down guys even hit the water.True for steelhead,Chinook ,Atlantics and Searun Browns.Searun Browns in particular.Last winter I hooked the majority on the sideways profile dead sinking drift and on the moment it began to swing around[get away!]!I have had the same experience in the middle of the Thompson heavy water,dead middle of fast travel lane on the Dean,etc,etc.Even when I am not targeting fish straight out there ,I want the cast there so as to be down and fishing properly when it arrives in that 70 degree zone that most guys splashdown at.Beau
 

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The single all the way! other then a Skagit set up were it feels a bit clunky on long casts.

All spey casts can be cast square, angled down or even up stream when you fully understand the 180 degree principle. You should cast the fly to were you think best and not rely on auto pilot.

Cheers,

Greg
 

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Sideways drift,or....

.......................Beau,I've noticed the same thing,do you think it's because of the angle of the fly,or because your fishing water the down and across guys aren't getting to?
 
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