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Discussion Starter #1
So there you are out on your favorite river fishing, or maybe you're just practicing, and then it happens; timing seems to disappear. You find yourself flogging away at the water, poor loops, too much line stick and so on. My question: Is there a way, one you can count on, to get you back on track and start casting correctly again?
I, for one, sometimes find it difficult to get my timing back very quickly. Any ideas?
Stan
 

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Speytarded, I used to find this happening to me all the time. Particularly on rivers like the Thompson--I'd just srart loosing it and couldn't for the life of me figure out why. A couple of years ago I finally realized that about ninety percent of my problems arose from the fact that my feet were not pointing even close to where I wanted the line to go, and where the feet point the body will follow. I now make a major effort to be roughly facing the direction that I want to cast.
 

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Jolly Buddha
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All I do is SLOW down, when I lose it I start going to fast with my swing
 

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Bebop's feet suggestion is one of the two things I have found to help in these cases. The other is to make sure I'm not holding the rod with a death grip. Holding it like a tube of toothpaste seems to force my body to relax and get back in that nice waltz rhythm. When all else fails, 20 minutes on the bank with a cigar watching the river flow by will do the trick.
 

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Timing

I have found that timing is closely related to tempo. Try slowing the tempo down (when you are practicing) by; 1, pausing between casting cycles; 2, purposely make the actual casting stroke PAINFULLY SLOW;and finally,3, think about the most positive part of your casting. Along with all the other suggestions, you should get a handle on more consistent timing and tempo by applying all these great ideas. Klem
 

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timing of cast

Hi Speytarded,
this is such a common problem, like Al says face the target, try and relax and slow things down, watch the line all through the cast , in front and behind and the anchor, watching the line all the way should help your timing, if not stop, have a break, the worsed thing is getting frustrated or trying to hard. :)
 

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Timing

I normally just change to the opposite hand and after a couple of casts switch back, dont know why but it works almost everytime. On the rare occasion that it does not work or wind does not allow opposite hand casting a short shore break is in order.


Ian
 

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I find this happens a lot when spending a lot of time on the water. You hook a fish and the adrenaline gets flowing and the next thing you know you look like a samurai on crack having a seizure. The timing has left you and you cant cast for sh!t. I usually take break and sit for a minute or re-tie my fly just because I should. Or maybe rifle through a fly box. After a break I then start over and slowly try to get my timing and tempo back to where it should be. Then all is good usually until I get tired or another fish hits and then I am ruined again?
 

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Coast2coast Flyfishaholic
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When timing leaves you...

Maybe it's time to revisit your queues. What do you key on during the progression of a cast? It could be everything from gut feel to real mnemonic devices. I tend to refine the latter for consistency, while striving for the former. I have very specific queues, and use them to practice and teach. They really help in fact they are critical for my way of thinking.

Great advice on slowing things down, but again if the pieces are not tied together the cast falls apart like a house of cards. That's the tricky part about spey casting, everything depends on everything else. That's also where the beauty lies as well I suppose.

As a last resort do the Derek Brown verbal correction - lift-two-three, loop-two-three, cast-two-three, drop. Just don't do it too loudly :lildevl:

Good luck, practice is key. A good instructor could help establish consistency as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Juro,
Thanks for your reply! I think I was leaning in that direction, relying on some sort of cadence or rythem to pull me through, but still encountering some difficulty at times. With only a little over a year and over a thousand hours of practice and fishing time, I'm not sure I should expect more. There are a lot of things that need to happen to make the cast work. There are also a lot of things that can go wrong. I appreciate your comments.
Stan
 

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When my casting goes to H--- I take in line until everything gets back in sink, then start letting out line to get back to the distance I need to fish. If that doesn't work I take the shore break and start out close in again and work up in distance. I find the 1-2-3 cadence helps me also.

Rich
 

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Lots of good suggestions... Mine is to switch to a diffeent cast, if my snake roll goes to hell I will switch to single spey or vice versa (wind permitting), it seems that even a few minutes with the different cast gets me back on the right track.
 
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