Spey Pages banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
945 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've read quite a few threads about splicing but wanted to double check to see if anyone had come up with anything new......like specific needles, adhesives, etc. Also, has anyone just done a lapped weld? How did that turn out?

And lastly, what about the strength and durability of splices? If done properly will they hold up to chinook? Inquiring minds want to know. I've accumulated several lines that if strategically butchered might just turn into some pretty good stuff.

Thanks,

CT
 

·
BULL DOG!!!!
Gaelforce
Joined
·
1,985 Posts
Poppy at the Redshed sells a splicing kit that should cover most of your needs:cool:
 

·
Hacker
Joined
·
616 Posts
Poppy's kit is great. Get the one with Al Buhr's little book. I probably use both a bit more than I should.
 

·
SteelheadJunky - new id
Joined
·
25 Posts
I've welded lines for a few years now. Airflo lines have a braided core so the PU coating will melt at a lower temp than the PVC lines. Most PVC lines have a mono core that melt close to the coating making them a little tricky, but doable.

I test each weld and if I'm in doubt I will tie it to the bumper of my truck and try to break it. They don't break and I have trusted the welds with large Clearwater and Skeena steelhead, along with Atlantic salmon in Russia and Iceland.

It helps to practice on some old lines. Btw you can make your own MOW tips. I much prefer Airflo "T" material made using PU.

Besides, it's fun. You can buy clear shrink tubing by the 100' roll. 3/32 works with most lines.
 

·
Spey Is The Way
Joined
·
1,024 Posts
I started a thread in General you might want to read. There is some good YouTube stuff out there as well.
 

·
loco alto!
Joined
·
3,072 Posts
A sturdy needle held with vice grips, and some GSP to pull the core through, is all you need to get started. Give it a try on some spare lines, admire your creation, then pull it apart to see where it fails. If it fails at the exit hole, you've done it right. Glue isn't needed, but is added for extra security, and (in theory) to keep water out of the line's core.

If you decide to keep splicing, then the pin vice sold at Redshed is a nice step up from vice grips.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
945 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Do lapped welds really not hold??? Seems to me that the loops on the ends of new factory lines, or tip loops for that matter, are nothing more than a weld. Hmmmm, might be an opportunity to do a little science and sacrifice some line for the good of the order.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,284 Posts
Do lapped welds really not hold??? Seems to me that the loops on the ends of new factory lines, or tip loops for that matter, are nothing more than a weld. Hmmmm, might be an opportunity to do a little science and sacrifice some line for the good of the order.
I not sure but seems that once a line is extruded and set then reheating it makes it weaker. Or - it may be that it is impossible to heat the coating using heat gun to a temp that is optimum for a factory-like welding??? PVC is hard to work with and the PU welds Ive done looked great and tested strong gave up quickly after repeated use.

On the other hand - the splices that I've done have been going for years now with no signs of weakening.
 

·
Dom
Joined
·
3,156 Posts
Any line can be welded.

I've probably done more welding experiments than anyone here. I strongly believe that welded loops and splices are strongest, slickest, and best looking connections on fly lines. Plus it seals the end of your precious lines core preventing water from soaking in.

Some fly lines cannot be fully welded due to lack of jacket material or its type therefore one must reinforce the junction. Aquaseal and similar adhesives works well for this but its drawback is drying time. It works great though.

Simply weld your loop to your best ability without weakening the core (extra caution must be taken when its mono core you are dealing with). All you need to achieve is forming a loop to hold the shape. Carefully remove the shrink tubing trying not to disturb the loop. Then simply apply a coat of Aquaseal or equivalent adhesive. Dry overnight by rotating every once in a while to achieve even cure.

This method works very well and its the best way to deal with lines that are hard to weld. Almost every line made today comes with loops that are "jacketed" one way or another. PU lines rarely needs any jacket and thats why I love them but almost every pvc line does need a protection of some form over the welds.

Using adhesives to reinforce the loops is easy but I wanted to get to the bottom of how major manufacturers are doing it. It involves two stage welds on Airflo factory lines. After initial weld protective jacket is slit on and welded again. Jacket melts and volia. I was able to obtain such tubbing and it works very well.

Another way to go around adhesives and trying to obtain "secret" tubbing is to use UTC D rib method I described some years ago here on speypages.

One way I like to splice lines together involves splicing exposed core into other exposed core with a needle. 3" splice is sufficient. Cores are exposed by using mono loop figure 8. Then again... weld. When lines are stripped some pvc is remaining in the core so that will give you enough grip before you do the next step. Now you can simply use Aquaseal or pack shaved particles of pvc/pu to cover the splice. Weld. Pack more. Weld, roll, pull the shrink tubbing to blend all in. Yea its time consuming but at the end of the day (literally...) your line will look like one continuous piece. I wish I could show you that last Delta I spliced last time.

Let me ask you... whats so special you are working on?Not enough lines out there? :D

My favorite custom line I made was my SH line that has a sink tip on one end and aggressive streamer taper on the other. No extra spools, one line that can be reversed. Bam. I should freaking patent this... :D
 

·
JD
Joined
·
3,612 Posts
Surprised no one mentioned

Aside from Poppy's splicing kit, but since I am totally oblivious as to what's included, I'll add my own comments.

Al Buhr's book: GOLD

Needles: these things come in a dazzling variety, sharp point, rounded point, rear eye, front eye you name it. Most are round, as such difficult to secure in a pin vise. Sewing machine needles are square at the rear end, hold well in a pin vise.

Stripping/ removing the coating: Mono or GSP, either will work, smaller Ø cuts through the coating better. You need a good clean core. If there is even the slightest bit of coating remaining, the core will not pull into the other lines core. Helps to soften the coating with a short soak in acetone. (cheap nail polish remover)

Razor blades: Although single edge blades are easier to use, for some reason the old double edge blades seem to cut better. They're cheap & come in a handy dispenser pack.

Misc: because I don't know how else to describe it. Core pullers? I've heard of people using just about everything. Dental floss? GSP? Bobbin threader? I was taught to use music wire, maybe the guy who showed me was a musician, I don't know, but since I was, I always had old strings I could use. The lightest gauge you can find works best. Two six inch long pieces, bent in half, very small bends. Cheap, one string get you at least four pieces.

Glue: Aqua-seal. Super glue, Loc-tite, Pliobond, your choice

Welding: Again, Al Buhr's book

A weld is a bond. Nothing sticks to dirt! Moisture, heated= steam, when trapped will cause a bubble, a void, a no no. Make sure you are working with clean dry lines!

Heat source: Done properly, even a cigarette lighter will work. But you'll burn a lot of lines before you get it right. :Eyecrazy: Control is the name of the game. Use something with a digital control.

Practice, practice, practice :chuckle:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,284 Posts
Absolutely!
Aside from Poppy's splicing kit, but since I am totally oblivious as to what's included, I'll add my own comments.

Al Buhr's book: GOLD

Needles: these things come in a dazzling variety, sharp point, rounded point, rear eye, front eye you name it. Most are round, as such difficult to secure in a pin vise. Sewing machine needles are square at the rear end, hold well in a pin vise.

Stripping/ removing the coating: Mono or GSP, either will work, smaller Ø cuts through the coating better. You need a good clean core. If there is even the slightest bit of coating remaining, the core will not pull into the other lines core. Helps to soften the coating with a short soak in acetone. (cheap nail polish remover)

Razor blades: Although single edge blades are easier to use, for some reason the old double edge blades seem to cut better. They're cheap & come in a handy dispenser pack.

Misc: because I don't know how else to describe it. Core pullers? I've heard of people using just about everything. Dental floss? GSP? Bobbin threader? I was taught to use music wire, maybe the guy who showed me was a musician, I don't know, but since I was, I always had old strings I could use. The lightest gauge you can find works best. Two six inch long pieces, bent in half, very small bends. Cheap, one string get you at least four pieces.

Glue: Aqua-seal. Super glue, Loc-tite, Pliobond, your choice

Welding: Again, Al Buhr's book

A weld is a bond. Nothing sticks to dirt! Moisture, heated= steam, when trapped will cause a bubble, a void, a no no. Make sure you are working with clean dry lines!

Heat source: Done properly, even a cigarette lighter will work. But you'll burn a lot of lines before you get it right. :Eyecrazy: Control is the name of the game. Use something with a digital control.

Practice, practice, practice :chuckle:
practice if you have the lines to do so with.

A clear shrink tubing that will melt and bond to any coating is something Id be very interested in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
945 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
domantus,

I just want to test some theories about tapers on some longer bellies........and work over some single hand lines for double hand use. May have just received a new (to me) $9.00 secret weapon for my 5wt courtesy of ebay. Just needs a little change before getting it out on the water for testing it as a long belly

CT
 

·
Internet Scientist
Joined
·
1,302 Posts
Just get some good solid silk threads exposed and unwound on each segment (about a 1/2 to 3/4 inch each), then "intertwine" them by twisting the two segments together and overwrap with a good silk thread and coat with typical varnish-oil-turpentine or such line treatment. Easy peasy. We are talking about splicing silk lines, right?
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top