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Discussion Starter #1
I've been playing around with the Highland Switch, which I usually do from the left bank with my right hand up and with an upstream wind (A wind from any other direction is dangerous as the line lands much closer to the right of the caster than usual).

This time I'm standing in the river out from the right bank. Right hand uppermost and downstream wind. Line "on the dangle." I lift the rod up and bring it down smartly on the river side of the rod and at an angle. The right hand goes no further upstream than out from my head. The stroke down to the water is made at a diagonal and cuts under the line. The line comes quickly upstream and lands very close in front of me - long line probably not recommended here! It is then very important to allow the current to take the line down to a position where one can then come up into the "key position" for a normal Roll Cast. What is this cast called?

Regards

Steven
 

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Sounds a bit like a modified Snap-T!
Stan

The road to Fly Casting excellance is a never ending journey.
 

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As others have said, the beginning move is the first step of a reverse snap T but you are not snapping the line as far upstream - A reverse snap t would be used with an upstream wind with line landing on your left side then an off shoulder cast for th D loop. In your case, you are snapping so the line lands in front then waiting for it to float downsteam slightly so you can perform a regular switch cast. As Chromer mentioned, a snake roll would likely be an easier cast under these conditions and the double is the standard.
 

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Hi Steven,
Not sure that the highland switch cast can be a snap T or modified snat T, as it was started over one hundred years ago, more like the snap T is a form of switch cast, i think all the new casts, are casts modified and given another name as has happened for a very, very long time.
Speycasters have encountered different situations and developed casts to suit, its the name that changes more than anything.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
speyghillie said:
Hi Steven,
Not sure that the highland switch cast can be a snap T or modified snat T, as it was started over one hundred years ago, more like the snap T is a form of switch cast, i think all the new casts, are casts modified and given another name as has happened for a very, very long time.
Speycasters have encountered different situations and developed casts to suit, its the name that changes more than anything.
Hi Speyghillie, I understand your point here. The "Highland Switch" from the left bank is a cast that I have tried using a spliced split cane rod and silk line. Amazing how easily the sunken line moves back into the optimal position for the forward cast.

Regards
Steven
 

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Hi Steven,
Fishing on the spey with greenheart rods and silk lines a hundred years ago you had to develop different casting styles, due to the weather ,cold water , and the wind direction , always seems to change even by the hour, it was sunny and warm last sunday, by tuesday is was snowing and cold,(summer in Scotland).
The guys then as now, had to fish in all conditions, so different casts developed.
You know how silk line can sink (like a stone) so casts developed to lift a sunk line as easy as possible, its not supposed to be work, this is where so many casts evolved, it nothing modern, just forgotten.
Gordon.
 
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