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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Got some feathers by surprise on the weekend from a friend that's got a peacock pr. I got lots of herl/large feathers with the full end 'eye' etc plus a few VERY cool looking small bright/metallic/irridescent blue (from the neck I believe?) feathers. I find myself wanting to tie some flys for the fisherman again:roll: , wondering how I can use these small blue feathers plus the major 'ends' of the main feathers.

Be fun to trade some if anyone else has some excess materials they might want to trade.
 

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Peacock feathers

Happy,

I use those irridescent blue feathers for a wing case on a searching nymph pattern with a herl body for Brookies . Works awesome ! Also as a topping on a small White Marabou streamer . Bodies on soft hackles , possiblities are endless !!

Mike
 

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blue breast feathers.

I use them for trout wets and throats on classic atlantic salmon flys like the "Regalia" and outhers.. also ties a great steelhead fly.
 

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There is a classic loch/lough fly over here called the 'Goat's Toe' that uses the irridescent neck feathers from a peacock. Not sure whether it originates from Ireland or Scotland, but it is quite well known in both places. Although designed for trout and sea trout, it has a reputation for taking its share of salmon too. Although originally designed for stillwater fishing from a drifting boat, there's no reason why it shouldn't catch fish in rivers. The pattern, according to Irish tying guru Peter O'Reilly, is:

Tail: Red wool.
Rib: Red wool twisted tightly.
Body: Bronze peacock herl.
Hackle: Blue peacock neck feather.

A variant replaces the red wool with orange Globrite floss (no 4), and adds a gold tag behind the tail, along with a long fibred black cock hackle under the peacock.

The hackle should be tied long and swept back, typically extending about half the body length beyond the hook bend. This gives it a streamlined profile not unlike a classic spey fly - please don't start calling it spey fly, though!
 

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Those blue peacock neck feathers can be used to tie some rather effective steelhead flies. You can use them as collars (especially with a purple body tied in the fashion of a salmon grub), tails, strip the fibers and wrap them as herl bodies, or even strip and use as wings. Blue is a very underated color for steelhead (at least in the PNW).
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Great suggestions and inputs!

Thanks, now to just find some time to put in at the vice. I find I just want to keep trying different ones lately so do only one or two of a pattern and then want to try another.....not very effective for getting into a patterns 'groove' and creating a few consistent ones!

I've got some natural/darker rhea enroute I think the blue will collar quite nicely over! And that rhea should work well on a tube lady caroline, only time will tell.

Thanks again for all the excellent experiences/inputs.
 

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Happy
I use the blue peacock as throats on my rhea intruders - they are also usefull as wing pads on some of the blue/black/purple rhea General Practitioner type shank flies I tie.
speydoc
 
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