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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I always look at my flies in the water, look for movement, color etc.

I have really liked seeing some of these classics wet and see why the fish like um...or us fisherman at least...so many patterns I tie I think look great in my box or vise but when in the water they are flat out busts...so now I'm starting to tie thinking about this more...but there is still a lot of room for error..

Very interested in seeing what the rest of you have on this post if anyone else is interested?

Yesterday was a good for wetting some flee's so here your seeing a smaller lady C and a Miss Grant with mallard for the wing...I also wet one of my goose caddis but the pic didn't turned out..

I was really impressed with the MG..
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
oops sorry about that last one...i didn't wet those...experimenting with colors and the bottom green one was an experiment..
 

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The lady C is awesome flee wet but you only get the true view when in the water and current hits it, that's when it comes to life. I think that's true with most flees out there.

I totally agree with you on tying for end result instead of tying for complete look on the vice.

Although the truest test is when the fly is in the corner of a steelies mouth.

KC
 

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These are all excellent choices. Nice tying all around.

I think that there is far more to how the fly is dressed and fished than the color scheme in how a fly will behave in the water.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
I agree with both...I'm looking for life in the water and both really have good movement as well as a very buggy body... I like seeing them matted down for the color schemes...very interesting on the design!!
 

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I agree guys, colour is further down the list. This is why I usually comment on profile and density (material bulk) of a fly in my posts here. After many, many years of observing how flies swim and act in the water, I've come to the conclusion that colours are more for the angler than the fish, especially in this game that we play called swinging.
Heavily dressed flies act like wet socks on the swing. The materials bunch up and do not allow for movement to occur. Also can change the hydro-dynamics of the fly causing it to skue, spin or ride upside down. It's amazing how two thin turkey strips for a wing have scissor like action on the swing. Or by stripping off one side of a BEP feather and applying only two sparse wraps to a collar can make any fly come alive in the water.
Paul, it's important to observe the flee in the water, not just wetting it and looking at it in your hand. Once the flee is removed from the water, the profile is much sleeker. The hackles, wing, dubbing, etc. are somewhat compressed, it does give a false impression of profile. Take the fly and hold it in the current by holding on to the tippet. Give yourself about 2 feet and immerse your arm under the surface so you can still see the flee. Now look at how the flee comes alive :hihi:



The fly above has a wing of Cul de Canard (tucan sub), in the water it has a higher profile. The BEP hackles can hardly be seen in the photo, but in the water, they miraculously appear and start to pulse and sway with every current. The tail is forked GP crests, tied long. These open up in the water and have a "twister-tail" like action :smokin: So much going on with this fly and it's hard to tell from the photo above if it would be effective.

Don't get me wrong Paul, wet shots are way cool !! And if anything, a wet shot shows body blending and iridescence of hackles and wing quills.

Here's my favorite Dee fly, it's a variant of the Balmoral



And a battle scared Green Highlander with a Bustard wing, just released a 34" buck before I snapped this photo




Mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I agree guys, colour is further down the list. This is why I usually comment on profile and density (material bulk) of a fly in my posts here. After many, many years of observing how flies swim and act in the water, I've come to the conclusion that colours are more for the angler than the fish, especially in this game that we play called swinging.
Heavily dressed flies act like wet socks on the swing. The materials bunch up and do not allow for movement to occur. Also can change the hydro-dynamics of the fly causing it to skue, spin or ride upside down. It's amazing how two thin turkey strips for a wing have scissor like action on the swing. Or by stripping off one side of a BEP feather and applying only two sparse wraps to a collar can make any fly come alive in the water.
Paul, it's important to observe the flee in the water, not just wetting it and looking at it in your hand. Once the flee is removed from the water, the profile is much sleeker. The hackles, wing, dubbing, etc. are somewhat compressed, it does give a false impression of profile. Take the fly and hold it in the current by holding on to the tippet. Give yourself about 2 feet and immerse your arm under the surface so you can still see the flee. Now look at how the flee comes alive :hihi:



The fly above has a wing of Cul de Canard (tucan sub), in the water it has a higher profile. The BEP hackles can hardly be seen in the photo, but in the water, they miraculously appear and start to pulse and sway with every current. The tail is forked GP crests, tied long. These open up in the water and have a "twister-tail" like action :smokin: So much going on with this fly and it's hard to tell from the photo above if it would be effective.

Don't get me wrong Paul, wet shots are way cool !! And if anything, a wet shot shows body blending and iridescence of hackles and wing quills.

Here's my favorite Dee fly, it's a variant of the Balmoral



And a battle scared Green Highlander with a Bustard wing, just released a 34" buck before I snapped this photo




Mike
Ok, I am not explaining myself to well...YES, it's in the water that is the important thing..many flies on the vice look great and as you say don't swim worth a damn...SO first off it has to have lots of movement and swim properly....
One of the reasons I have had a hard time fishing more classic flies is I didn't have faith in them compared to my waddingtons with black BEP and Blue flash...
Now that I see some of these underwater, i.e. the Lady C's pops underwater...and the movement while not "flash" has more life then I ever gave them credit for .... the old tinsels, herron and colors give some of these incredibly natural life....
I'm very impressed by the movement but also "when WET" how the wings etc. all seem to come together in a very cool way..

If that makes sense now..
 

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Mike's point about lightly dressed flies is a great one, as is the general point that flies on the vice and in the water can be very different. One thing I was struck by this winter was beauty of the Glasso-style feather-wing herons. Besides the fact that the feather wings keep that fly swimming absolutely true--that is, straight up and down--even on a light wire (standard wire) hook, the profile of the fly remains full even in fast water.
 

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Hold the Lady Caroline up to light - dry or wet - and see how she shimmers. The GP breast feather has an almost translucent quality to it. BEP also - a pheasant after all - but to a lesser degree. The tinsels reflect light through the collar and it just lights up. Single slips of BM in wing let light through also.
 

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A big 10-4 on the Glasso-style featherwings !!
Just an awesome swinging profile :smokin::smokin:


Mike
 
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