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None,

Just make sure the cane is clean and dry, then tape away.

Mark
 

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Pmcleare.

Can you give a few details of the rod in question? Maker?

Cheers.
J.
 

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+1

None,

Just make sure the cane is clean and dry, then tape away.

Mark
Only time I don't like a cane rod is in a driving rain (which we don't get here in Southern Oregon all that often, well leave the Pacific Coast out of that**). Darned sections can loosen up and I'm petrified that I may snap the rod at a joint.

** Back in the day and 'trapped' in my motor home for days watching the Chetco go from low and clear to 100 year floods. Even the Dog didn't want to go out side to take a pee. Saki had a litter box. :rolleyes:
 

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What wax do guys use to wax there spliced boo rod joints before taping?

Thanks
No need to wax spliced joints on 'boo rods.


Mike
 

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Patrick Clearey
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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks

OK, no wax. Thanks for the feed back.
The rod is a 7wt., 11ft., Red Wing, 3 piece. Which I don't actually have in my hands ....yet.
Pat
 

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Pat.

I would urge you to speak with Joe at Redwing rods first about your waxing question as he would certainly know best for his rods.

I wax all my rods 2-4 times per year depending on use and I reccomend the same to those who fish rods I have made for them. This light waxing not only acts as a release agent for the tape used to bind the joints it also allows the joints to slip against one another with slightly less friction. I realize this is contrary to the advice and experiance given above, and as such should be taken with a grain of salt in regards to other makers rods. I also do the same with sharpes splice joint rods.

Cheers.
James.
 

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James - I'm thinking maybe there's reference to different wax here in these posts. One wax may be the sticky kind like you'd use on those "inferior ferrules" (LOL - don't flame you ferrule lovers - just friendly chain pull), and the wax you're referring too which is kind of like the wax you put on your Prius to make it look spiffy and "glide" through the air to get that 100mpg...

yeah, I had an O-fer two days on the river, and I couldn't cast the silk DT to save my pathetic life:(
 

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Patrick Clearey
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Discussion Starter #9
Sticky Wax

Correct, it is my understanding that there is a wax used to keep the joint from slipping.
I do typically throw a coat of Johnson Paste Wax on all my rods, boo or graphite

James, you are always so willing to share your knowledge, thanks.
 

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What do you use?

Pat.

I would urge you to speak with Joe at Redwing rods first about your waxing question as he would certainly know best for his rods.

I wax all my rods 2-4 times per year depending on use and I reccomend the same to those who fish rods I have made for them. This light waxing not only acts as a release agent for the tape used to bind the joints it also allows the joints to slip against one another with slightly less friction. I realize this is contrary to the advice and experiance given above, and as such should be taken with a grain of salt in regards to other makers rods. I also do the same with sharpes splice joint rods.

Cheers.
James.
What type of wax do you use, James? Cheers, Buff.
 

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The original method of lashing together spliced-joint wood (greenheart or lancewood) or bamboo rods was by using a leather thong (like a thin shoelace); this was at a time before the more widespread use of adhesive tape.

Most people using wood & 'boo rods today would not be using leather thongs, and thus use adhesive taping.

I can fully see, therefore, that protecting the area of the splice with some form of wax would thus potentially protect the rod surfaces from the effects of the adhesive from these tapes, but would be interested in why it is thought that adding wax would prevent slippage of spliced joints....


Mike
 

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I will give it a try...

Waxes are used to manipulate the coefficient of friction, decreasing it or increasing it. Davie McPhail says "wax your thread" - to increase the friction between the thread and the material being tied in. Two surfaces like the bamboo spliced joint, waxed with non-skid wax, are not going to slide over each other easily.
 

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Looking forward to the answer to your question.

What type of wax do you use, James? Cheers, Buff.

Way back in the day it was 'Bee's Wax,' some used unscented candle wax, first worked well, the second I always found 'questionable.'

fae
 

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Buff.

I have been using Turtle brand liquid "Ice Wax" for the last few years and have been very happy with this synth wax. I would imagine that other high quality auto waxes would perform as well. Easy application as well. Wipe on, wait a min or 2, wipe off and buff, done.

An interesting historical quote...

"Farlow has recently introduced a "band" for the purpose. Each lap adheres to the wood, and, in finishing off, the upper lap rigidly sticks to the one placed beneath it, and remains so. By the employment of this "band" the rod can be put up in three minutes and keep firm for the whole season. It is the neatest form of "whipping" as yet introduced."

George M Kelson - disscussing the new tape for putting up splice joint rods, from "The Salmon Fly"

I can see how fisherman would have been excited about this development!



Cheers.
J
 

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James - sounds like an early form of speed wrap

Fred - bee's wax is sticky, use it on your fly tying thread, and your graphite rod ferrules. Don't use it on spliced joints.
 

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Many thanks for the heads up!

James - sounds like an early form of speed wrap

Fred - bee's wax is sticky, use it on your fly tying thread, and your graphite rod ferrules. Don't use it on spliced joints.
Still have a small supply of the wax (don't know what kind) that came with my Boo-spey but I'll damned sure to find out!

Fred
 

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Goodmorning Jerry.

J.
 

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CaneRods
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Wax for spliced rods

When I started making spliced two-handed bamboo rods finished with urethane I found that the joints squeaked. After trying many different waxes I finally settled on a sticky dubbing wax. I dab it on then rub briskly with a cloth. Problem solved.
Ron Grantham
Port Moody BC
 
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