Spey Pages banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
A spin-off from the Broke a spey rod thread....

spey_bubba said:
Rods would cost considerably less if a reasonable manufacturer's warranty existed (like a warranty against breakage due to manufacturer's defect in normal use) for a few years. As fly rods are not designed, and materials are not available, to last forever, I would think that most discerning fly fishermen wouldn't mind paying additionally for an actuarial-based extended warranty if they really wanted to have a rod covered forever.
I would like to see rods with that kind of warranty. I hate to pay the price of the warranty within the rod's price when I buy a rod. I think a warranty should be separated. I think that Loop has a 1+24 years warranty. The 1st year is always included with the rod but you can pay extra to get those 24 more years. I'm not sure of the terms of the policy (unconditional or not) since I didn't take the 24 year extension.


spey_bubba said:
If one takes into consdieration the return rate of rods from all types of breakage, high performance lightweight rods will suffer the most... across the industry, these represent somewhere around 9-10% of breakage returns, and are also the most expensive to make. Individual lineups within a company may also vary; longstanding "utility infielder" rod return rates may be as low as 1-3%. If you imagine what it must cost a manufacturer to stop a production run to make an old pattern on a mandrel which is no longer being used with materials which may have to come out of the archives because somebody shut their rod in a car door and expects it to be free (less the handling charge of $20 or so), it's absurd.
My only rod that I have broken is my dear old Scott G802-2 (build from a blank), which has broken twice. The butt section once when I fell on it and second time when I put it in the trunk with only the bag keeping it away from the cruel world and didn't notice that my father put some beer bottles there afterwards. The bottles, of course, broke the tip while I was driving. The first time the new butt section was done on the old spigot. Second time I can't remember. Anyway, I very grateful to Scott. The times that the rod broke made it miss two long trips to Lapland, which made me really sad. Especially the second time since it wasn't my fault.

Back to business....

I think that the warranty system should be three step thing.
Something like this for example:

- No extra cost: 1 year or other fairly short period of time (appointed by laws or good manners) in which the material or workmanship defects will occur.
- Extra cost: Unconditional lifetime or some other very long time warranty. If production has stopped and there aren't any rods left, the rod will be replaced with a production model that is comparable.
- Highest extra cost: Undconditional lifetime or very long time warranty that replaces the rod or section of a rod. Even if the production has stopped none are left.

I think that long, not unconditional warranty isn't needed since otherwise everyone will just say that it broke without an obvious cause.

Since I have that Scott G802-2 with unconditional lifetime warranty, which is a two section model and the production model nowadays is a three piece one, should I break (knock on wood) my dear old friend, I'd like to cut costs by asking Scott to replace it in a manner that costs them the least (probably a whole new blank).

What do you guys think?
 

·
Pullin' Thread
Joined
·
4,694 Posts
In my opinion, the only things that a manufacturer should replace free of charge is a rod or rod section that had a defect in its manufacture. Any other breakage should only be done if the rod's owner pays the manufacturer the manufacturer's cost of replacing the section plus shipping. Additonally, if a rod is no longer in production, the manufacturer should not be expected to replace the broken section and instead should offer the rod's owner the new rod that replaced it for the cost of manufacturing the rod, plus shipping.

It is long past time for rod owners to take responsibility for their rods and pay for replacement sections or rods when they break them by closing car doors on them, putting them in car trunks without the protection of a rod case, falling of them, etc. By simply having rod manufacturers only replace rod section where a defect caused the break for no charge and charging replacement cost for all other rod breakage, the consumer would be well-served and be far more careful about how he cares for his rods.

Having the rod owner paying the manufacturers cost for making the replacement rod section plus shipping (and sales tax for in-state rod owners) when he (or one of his buddies or family members) broke the rod, the rod owner would not have to pay a huge sum for the new rod section and the manufacturer would not have to charge as much for their rods since only defects would be the only thing manufacturer's would replace for no charge. This would allow rod owners to get a new section for I'd guess between $25.00 and $65.00 a section plus shipping.

I venture to say that you would see fewer broken rods because people would take better care of their rods if they had to pay for replacement sections when they break a rod in a car door, tree branch, car trunk, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
cost of warrenty??

if the rod builders stopped providing a free blanket warranty, do you think the price of rods would decrease?i seriously doubt it!!each rod company is free to do what it thinks best for business and that is a good thing. :Eyecrazy:
 

·
Pullin' Thread
Joined
·
4,694 Posts
It makes no difference if the price stays the same or goes down or goes up for new rods. My point is that when people do dumb things like close car doors or trunk lids on rods, put unprotected rods in car trunks, put rods on the ground so they get stepped on, catch them in tree branches, etc. the rod woner should be the one who pays to have the rod repaired, not the manufacturer. However, if the rod breaks due to material flaws, the manufacturer should repair it at no cost for a reasonable period of years, which is what I was speaking about.

If people have to pay for the repair of rods they broke through their own actions (car doors, stepping on them, etc.), there would be fewer people doing dumb things with their rods. Thus, there would be fewer broken rods, and that is a good thing for both the rod manufacturers and the rod owner (consumer) because the rod manufacturer would have more resources available for rod development and design and the consumer would take better care of his rods resulting in fewer days lost on account of having a broken rod.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
i agree that people do dumb things in breaking their rods and so far (knock on wood) i have avoided it.the care one gives their rod is a personal choice thing with the rod unaware of their fate :chuckle: . in the end business and they will do what is best for their bottom line and if that is giving a blanket warranty or not then it will do so.i doubt rod repairs has caused sage to not be able to update a rod class or come out with a new rod though i could be wrong.
 

·
PiscatorNonSolumPiscatur
Joined
·
802 Posts
There are some people that would take better care of their rods if they knew they would be footing the bill for a careless breakage. I know a few people like that. Some people take care of their rods as if there were no warranty.
It would be very interesting to know how much less a premium rod could be sold for if there were no warranty or with some warranty syystem as sms suggested.
I suspect the total expenditures for broken rods for a company each year to be pretty low, but I might be wrong. Alot of careless breakage that was absorbed by the company would have to play a role in the price of rods. There are also fishermen who don't buy used rods because there is no warranty. So, such a system might also affect the used rod market.
 
J

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
The truth is that prices would not likely go down, but the rate of price increases would be much lower. The fact that is often not considered is that the companies cannot just declare all the unlimited warranties handed out over the last decade plus to no longer be in effect. The extra money we pay on a rod today is used to fix rods sold in previous years with the warranty. It would likely take a decade or more before most of these rods would be out of warranty due to the fact that the original owners no longer have them. I've seen figures quoted in the industry press that suggests that $80.00-$100.00 of the price of a new high-end graphite rod is used to cover the cost of the unlimited warranties. It is quite likely even higher for some of the notoriously brittle rods (GLX, etc.). I find it refreshing that many of you on this site recognize the problem with unlimited warranties and are suggesting that they be discontinued. I visit some sites where you would be vilified to no end for suggesting such a thing. Few things on those boards gets flamed more than suggesting that unlimited warranties are really more of an insurance policy, and that insurance is almost never "free."
 

·
Damn fish ladder
Joined
·
199 Posts
End of Unlim warranties

Actually, any and all rod companies can CERTAINLY discontinue all unlimited warranties. Think about what big multi-nationals and utilities are doing with something as sacred as pensions...

But, I think the only economy that will save them is this: Some day in the next five to ten years, most rods now made in the US will be made in Korea or China. I mean, it sucks, but it is inevitable. Look at Winston. Look at Orvis. How about all the other manufacturers who make GOOD rods, but make the blanks and assemble them in the labor "blue zones."

Look at Fender guitar--- there are, like, five places of manufacture for every guitar- with Korea on the bottom, Japan in the Middle, and US at the top in terms of quality, price, and resale value.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top