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Discussion Starter #1
I made up a grass leader to do some "lawn" spey casting to practice this weekend and was thinking about video taping the session to get some feed back. Would really like to do this on the water but time this weekend won't allow it. Looking to do that in the next couple of weeks.

Question is -- Where to position the camera/tripod relative to casting? out front, behind, or to the side.

Anyone video their swing? Any Instructors do this to provide some feed back to students?

thanks - Hansen
 

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Hansen;

I have found videotaping students (and my own) casting stroke an invaluable teaching tool. Video analysis has been a huge part of my classes and clinics for many years; although we all may think we swing like Tiger Woods, the videocamera doesn't lie.

I am not an advocate of practicing on grass. A grass leader simply does not adequately give the feel of casting on water, and in my opnion, can lead to timing and backcast loop shape errors, as grass is so forgiving.

As far as video taping, I think that multiple views are great. Videoing yourself is easier with a tripod and a remote control; even easier if you can con someone into doing it for you. Here are a couple of links to non-commercial sites to give you an idea of what views may be useful:

http://www.virtualflycasting.com/way_yin1.htm

http://homepage.mac.com/speycaster/Menu4.html

Good Luck

Bubba
 

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"I am not an advocate of practicing on grass. A grass leader simply does not adequately give the feel of casting on water, and in my opnion, can lead to timing and backcast loop shape errors, as grass is so forgiving"

Way, A question for those of us who have a wife, 2.5 kids, a dog, two cats, and work 10-12 hour days (not to mention the 45 minute drive to moving water). Can you suggest a method of practice ? Getting to the river on a regular basis is harder than ever. I honestly believe my casting ability has declined in the past three years.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Andre,

I would agree that praticing on grass isn't the best. I too am in a similar situation as far as 2 kids, 10 hour work days, but a little shorter drive to the river to practice -- 30 min.

Be interested in what Way would suggest. I have just practiced with the butt portion of the rod in doors.

Thanks, Hansen
 

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Hansen -

Grass ain't water but it's sure better than what you're doing now with all due respect. If you can get someone to tape you, that's best but if not here are a few suggestions made as if you were going to post your videos for us all to comment on for you:

1) Profile at full d-loop scale - side shot far enough to see the whole rod in front and the whole d-loop in back from the casting side

Side profile allows the lift, speed and angle to be watched. Then it allows the flatness of the backward sweep to the d-loop as well as the rise to be observed as well as the anchor. It does not however allow for the accurate detection of the casting plane (angle of aim) that the d-loop ends up in or the true tracking of the forward stroke so we need the rear view.

2) Rear at full height scale - standing directly in back of the casting side far enough back to see the rod's highest height through the whole cast

This allows the direction of the energy wave coming off the rod into the d-loop to be watched for alignment as well as the forward casting stroke's tracking angle (rod tip travel). You also get to see the line sailing away, which has a certain feel-good aspect to it. :)

3) full or near full whole-cast angled (isometric) scale from casting side taken from a higher point like a bridge or hill near the river including d-loop

This angle will provide general insight for anything not easily detectable in the other two, like anchor shape, turbulence in the line, poor d-loop shape, body position and rotation, etc.

Casts: Do a switch, single spey with 45 deg min chg, and double spey with 90 deg chg. for starters.

That should be enough to get started. When can we expect to see this posted? :lildevl:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Juro,

Thanks for the reply. I'll work on that this weekend and see what I am able to accomplish.

Posting.. should be an interesting techincal challenge. I'll try to figure out something and see if I can. Would certainly provide some entertaining responses. :hihi:
 

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Hello Andre and Hansen;

Yes, time to practice can be difficult to come by. I feel that rarer but dedicated and quality practice time is better than practice which either is not productive, or reinforces bad habits. Kind of like going to the range and hitting 10 balls off the mat with no clear practice routine in mind... it is useless. I think castingn with a grass leader is a lot like hitting short irons off the mat, there is too much forgiveness, and although the illusion of progress will be made, it is quickly dispelled when you step out onto the course and are confronted with a soggy lie.

While I think that quality practice with overhead casting can be done in as little as 15 minutes, because the Spey cast is more complicated, and with more variables, 15 minutes of grass casting is unlikely to result in huge casting improvements.

I believe that practice on still water is not as good as running water, but infintely better than grass casting. Often, there will be easier access to still water than running water for many. I am lucky; there is a lake 5 minutes from where I live, but in the summer months there are too many people about to practice; so I'll take the 35 minute drive to the river whenever I can (usually for an hour before dark).

Good Luck!
 
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