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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My friend inspired me with UV material
Pike anglers have used them with success for a lot of years.
I checked by UV torch my materials and it looks that I used some of them for years :hihi:. Only now I checked it .
On photo two big (10cm) Monkeys looked almost the same but one is with UV yellow hackle. Have to test it on animals next week .
What is your opinion about using of UV materials in salmon flies ?



 

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I did some reading on research supporting UV efficiency the other day. It sounds to me that there is a large group of fish species that are able to see UV range. It also seems that at times UV colours attract more than non-UV. It is more likely that UV attracts more in low light conditions. I can't say that I have tested it enough. Definitely something to test a bit more.
 

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UV materials: Never tried them wondering if Salmon and/or Steelhead can see UV that it would make a difference. Light and color - it gets pretty complicated from what Im reading.
 

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Klops,

I assume on one of your second photos you blasted the fly with UV lamp.

What you see on the fly is effect after material absorbed UV light; material is not emitting UV light.

Another world, UV light (approx. 200-350 nm) has been absorbed and the material emits a different light color.

If material absorbes a given light spectrum, what we see is remaining spectrum.

A material has black color, because near entire visible spectrum form UV, blue, green to red has been absorbed.

It is also worth to mention that UV component of visible spectrum solar spectrum is very small. The most intensive range is from blue to red ( 450 to 800 nm).

They are plenty of chromophores ( dyes) which can absorb UV light and then emit a color we see, and that color can be blue, green red and combination of these colors.

These materials are called fluorescence chromophores( dyes) . Since Blue and green are very visible in is a low light conditions, ideally the material should contain fluorescence blue and green, another world, absorb UV and emit blue and/or green
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yes we do not know how salmons distinguish UV light and what more we do not know how important it is and how it is transfer on efficiency of our flies. However we know that some flies are more successful than another . why ? For sure they is much more than one factor which has influence on it. This we know . Important are : size, profile , color combination , way of tying an a lot of more. And we know that sometime also small changes in fly increase efficiency of it . OK difficult to measure it but still we talking about our hobby (or craziness ) not about scientific test.
I checked soft tubing which I have used for years and I see that most of them are luminous . Hmm yeaers a go I discovered that exchange tubing from clear to colour gives sometime very good effect . Maybe due to UV maybe due just color . In fact not so important . Important is that it is working at list for me .
And in fact it is already a lot or I can say enough for me . :hihi:



 

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Uv

I can share that I have used on the large patterns for chinooks and steelhead, mostly the pearl colored polar chenille....it really pops and gives off beautiful prismatic hues in all directions that I believe they could see from all directions...I can attest that chinooks loved it. It did outperform the other patterns I used,,,and I fished 2 flies into the ground until the fish just mangled them and they were unusable....what I would like to hear further if the team here feels strongly about things like the UV marabou, etc...:eek:
 
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