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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone know the differences in sink rates between the Rio Type 8 and T-14?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I have assumed a Type 8 is 8"/sec so seems you are right. I know the type 8 is very fine diameter (I think less than the T-14) which would aid in getting down in squirrly currents.
 

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Steelhead are cool!
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Type 8 is pretty thin so I don't use it for large/heavy flies. They don't turn over well. Type 6 or T14 turn heavy flies over good. Just a personal opinion.
 

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#&%*@^# Caster
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I think the type 8 tips do indeed sink faster that t14. The thinner makeup of T8 is what I feel enables this. T14 gets down as well but If you take a 15' section of t14 alonside 15' of T8 you will notice how much quicker the T8 gets down.

That being said I agree with Kevin. I think the T14's bulk provides alot better turnover at distance than T8 which is why I use it.

However with the low flows around these parts I have only fished a type 3 for the past month. My T14 tips have not seen water in a long time.

Rain...please...

-sean
 

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"The major plus (to me anyway) of t-14, is that you can make tips longer than the standard 15' type 8 tips."

You can also make them much shorter, while not sacrificing overall weight, which can be an advantage too. Sometimes shorter is better. "It's not the length of the wand but the magician that wields it." :hihi:
 

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.........I agree with MJYP, when it takes two anchors too hold the boat, the water is 32/33 degrees, and the water is 5' or deeper, here comes 20' of T14!!!
 

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Grains probably more than sink rate

From my experience with both T-14 and the #8 tips, I think the key is actually the grain weight more than sink rate, and the issue of turnover relative to the main line belly. I find them pretty interchangeable for sink, with the T-14 maybe a bit faster because its sheer weight resists currents and drag better than lighter/thinner high density tips. But I'm not always throwing lines that will turnover 14 gr/ft. The type 8 tips sink very well at lighter weight of gr/ft, aiding turnover on lighter lines. When fishing the heavier lines, the T-14 is a nice add-on because I can cut custom lengths. That gets pricey with cuts on factory tips.
 

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loco alto!
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3,052 Posts
wouldn't it be nice if tungsten lines of different grains were sold on spools?

T-8
T-10
T-12
T-14


"if I was king"
 

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Coednakedspey
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168 Posts
I am of the opinion that T-14 and Type 8 sink at virtually the same rate. However there is one key difference that may put the balance in favour of type 8, in theory anyways. I believe the type 8 tips that you purchase prepackaged/manufactered with welded loops or that come with your sink tip system are probably density compensated. Meaning that the type 8 tip itself is tapered from thick to thin as it moves towards the leader to compliment continuing the forward taper of your floating line before the loop (where it meets the sink tip) and yet the thin portion b/c it is Density compensated sinks the same as the thick portion to help keep your fly down. In some respects the thinner tip of the sink tip will probably also be less influenced by current which is also a benefit to fishing your fly and keeping it down. However, because of the Density compensation, this also makes the type 8 tip a lot more pricey. How much are replacement type 8 tips? Like $20-25 CDN in your local tackle store? I'm sure with the right tip infrastructure in place (IE you have loops, flexament, or whatever you fancy to make your own loops for a custom sink tip system) you could make your own T-14 tips at easily half price of the replacement Type 8's, maybe even cheaper. And gentlemen, we're talking about Type 8's here. Nothing is graceful about type 8/T-14 sink tips. So who cares, really, if it tapers from thick to thin, or is density compensated.

One thing to consider though about loop systems is that it has been my personal expierience that with sink tip systems that you should always utilize the same type of loops in conjunction with each other. If your floating line main loop is kevlar, always use kevlar loops on your custom sink tips to loop to it. If it's a "welded" factory sink tip system loop from a Rio system as an example, then you should try and have replacement tips that are welded. They work better together, and the transfer of energy to turning over those tips, especially the heavier tips, works much better over the course of the day fishing/casting.

The biggest vice that turns me away from buying factory sink tip systems and always building my own, with respect to my above 2 paragraphes, is the fact that fishing those heavy tips, you MUST have back up tips of the same length & density. If you use a type 8 or T-14 tip with any sort of regularlity, you are going to rock them, abraise them, tear, them, and rip them. If it's your bread and butter tip, you're going to need a back up or two in the exact same configuration. And being someone who fancies himself on fishing for winter steelhead where the use of heavier tips is prevalent it is far cheaper and more convenient for me to just build a bunch of my own. I also find that I seem to stay away from the "change a tip syndrome." I think it makes more sense to have only one or two configurations of sink tips, and learn how to fish and work with them, as opposed to approaching runs and opening your tip wallet each and every time which costs you time in the water fishing when you could just adjust your cast/position of your fly in relation to flow and density of your sink tip to fish a run a certain way. I guess it can be best summed up by the phrase: "keep it simple."
 

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loco alto!
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Scott K said:
If you use a type 8 or T-14 tip with any sort of regularlity, you are going to rock them, abraise them, tear, them, and rip them.
as a note, I have found that in the lighter weights (e.g., 9 wt), the Type-8 tips don't stand up to very much abuse. The T-14 seems more abrasion resistant.
 
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