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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This coming September, I will have the opportunity to fish for Tarpon around the St Augustine area from boats.

My friend, who has invited me knows of my past shoulder injuries which make the use of a single handed rod impossible for me.

He said that my Meiser 9/10 switch rod would not be big enough for the Tarpon at this time of the year. I will bring it along for Redfish if the Tarpon aren't around.

He said that he and his future Brothers in Laws don't want rods any longer than 11' on their boats.

So what suggestions besides the Meiser/Beulah 10/11 Switch rods does anyone have?

Then what Tarpon lines would you recommend for these lines?

Thanks
 

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JD
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Tarpon

Dave, I used to have in laws in Jacksonville so I would fish that area now and then with a local guide. The first time I fished with him we did Reds and Sea Trout, both wade fishing and from the boat. Reds are a hoot when you get the right tide conditions. You can sight cast to tailing fish.

About the Tarpon. When I was there, they were still developing the Tarpon fishery. Which means no one had much experience doing Tarpon on a fly in that area. We would find them rolling in a back bay. (Intra Coastal Waterway) The guide pulled out an eleven wt Orvis rod strung up with a 15 ft sink tip line. You had to wait 'till you saw one roll, then cast to where you thought he may be. And they were never what you would call close.

We never hooked up. I was used to throwing 12 wt shooting heads on my 9 wt rod. But that big 11 wt rod beat me to death. When the tide changed, we went back for the Reds.

I think Meiser makes something suitable for two hand overhead casting that may be capable of whipping a Tarpon. You might want to give him a call. Talk to the locals about flies, lines and presentations. They may have a better handle on it by now. And then your buddies at Rio for lines. Then get back with the Meise. Good Luck.
 

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#&%*@^# Caster
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Talke to monic fly lines and bob meiser. They are making saltwater suitable shooting heads that will work in the weather down there. I think Bob will be able to let you in on what lines to match to his rods.

-sean
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Sean, thanks for the feedback

My friend and his future BIL's and other in law relatives have been very successful with flies fishing for tarpon in the last few years. My friend has email some incredible Tarpon pictures of fish that he has caught in the last two seasons. So Flies, terminal gear and where to go will be left up to them.

I need to find a two handed rod or rods and the lines to match.

Simon is out for a while in Canada, and I will contact him later. I think that a local has a Beulah 11/12 switch rod. I will contact about and try to meet him on our local river to try his rod and line.

The red fish are incredible fish to catch on a fly rod.

Thanks.
 

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Dave,
Find an overhand line that loads the rod properly and pair it with a quality disc drag reel and you should be fine. From my understanding the 9/10 switch designation is not the overhand designation and your rod will be more than adequate.
Chris
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
JD thanks for the feedback

After having an alligator try for a redfish, I had on my line near JAX, I wouldn't want to be wading for them in that area. There were alligator slide chutes all over.

I will be posting my question to Meiser.

Thanks for the feedback.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Chris thanks

FLGator said:
Dave,
Find an overhand line that loads the rod properly and pair it with a quality disc drag reel and you should be fine. From my understanding the 9/10 switch designation is not the overhand designation and your rod will be more than adequate.
Chris
My 9/10 does very well with 350 to 450 grain built in heads or shooting heads in a boat. It/I start to have problems with anything much over 450 grain heads.

I gotten some feedback that my 9/10 Switch Rod would do well in a boat with the Rio Outbound Floaters in the 11 and 12 weight class with a floating or intermediate fly.

My 9/10 switch rod whips a 15# Striper into fast submission, but that :Eyecrazy: isn't a 100 pound tarpon.

I have the big Breakwater reel, and I could probably reel in my boat with it.
Some people have said that my Loop4W with 300 yards of backing will work. My son has all types of Able and other salt water reels I can borrow.
 

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Load up the big Breakwater with one of your overhead lines and never look back. If you get spooled, so be it! Give 'em the down and dirty and put the wood to them and you'll be ok. Biggest challenge you'll have with your rod is making an accurate cast in the wind. Casting your fly quickly and accurately from a large rod over head, factoring in the wind, current and fish travel will be the issues. However, IF you WANT to buy a new rod...THAT's a whole different situation :smokin:.

Have a great trip and make sure you take a digital camera so you can post pictures for all of us to live vicariously through your adventures.

Take care,
Chris
 

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i regularly fish for reds and trout with the two handed rods from boats or wading. the 12 and 13 foot rods do very well and i've never had a tremendous problem with landing fish. the standard single handed rods are generally 12 weights but people do fish with 10 weights as well. it seems to me that the big rods give me an adantage when fighting fish but i don't generally target tarpon as really big tarpon are difficult problem on any rod. my advice is to target the smaller ones. my friends and i have lost a lot of lines to big tarpon. boats help sometimes but they are not a panacea. we generally fish for tarpon in the surf or on the jetties and some transfer to boats thereafter. landing in the surf is not a problem although you may have to walk a long way. the jetties are a little more difficult because landing spots are few and far between. if the big rods have a problem it is that they are somewhat cumbersome in a restricted area. however, most of the successful tarpon fishermen in texas are just leadering their fish anyway and are not concerned with an actual landing. the tarpon have only recently returned after an absence of over 50 years and most of the guys feel they are too important to waste. in fact, the laguna madre fly fishing association dropped the tarpon competition because we found landing and measuring to be to rough on the fish.
 

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GS, since you are already a competent two-handed overhead caster, I would recommend that you try to find a 12-weight 9' bluewater type rod with a lower grip long enough to cast with. Combined with a shooting head system, or something like the Outbound, you can cast all the line you need with no effort, and without the headaches associated with longer rods in a boat.

I have never fished for tarpon, but if I were planning for your trip, I would buy an S-glass/graphite composite 9' 12-weight blank and build it up with a lower grip about 5" long.
 

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JD
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gators

Grampa Spey said:
After having an alligator try for a redfish, I had on my line near JAX, I wouldn't want to be wading for them in that area. There were alligator slide chutes all over.

I will be posting my question to Meiser.

Thanks for the feedback.
:eek: WUS :razz: :lildevl:
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks Chris

FLGator said:
Load up the big Breakwater with one of your overhead lines and never look back. If you get spooled, so be it! Give 'em the down and dirty and put the wood to them and you'll be ok. Biggest challenge you'll have with your rod is making an accurate cast in the wind. Casting your fly quickly and accurately from a large rod over head, factoring in the wind, current and fish travel will be the issues. However, IF you WANT to buy a new rod...THAT's a whole different situation :smokin:.

Have a great trip and make sure you take a digital camera so you can post pictures for all of us to live vicariously through your adventures.

Take care,
Chris
That may be what I end up doing, taking my 9/10 Switch Rod, the Breakwater and some of my overhead lines.

My friend is a digitial camera expert, and if I'm lucky to get onto one, he will take the pictures. I don't like to bring in a big catch and release fish. So if I get lucky, any pictures may have him swimming close to the boat before we cut him off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
2HandTheSalt, thanks

2HandTheSalt said:
GS, since you are already a competent two-handed overhead caster, I would recommend that you try to find a 12-weight 9' bluewater type rod with a lower grip long enough to cast with. Combined with a shooting head system, or something like the Outbound, you can cast all the line you need with no effort, and without the headaches associated with longer rods in a boat.

I have never fished for tarpon, but if I were planning for your trip, I would buy an S-glass/graphite composite 9' 12-weight blank and build it up with a lower grip about 5" long.
My son the cro mag salt water caster probably has more rods than most fly shops. I will check with him to see what he has.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Jack Keller

jack keller said:
i regularly fish for reds and trout with the two handed rods from boats or wading. the 12 and 13 foot rods do very well and i've never had a tremendous problem with landing fish. the standard single handed rods are generally 12 weights but people do fish with 10 weights as well. it seems to me that the big rods give me an adantage when fighting fish but i don't generally target tarpon as really big tarpon are difficult problem on any rod. my advice is to target the smaller ones. my friends and i have lost a lot of lines to big tarpon. boats help sometimes but they are not a panacea. we generally fish for tarpon in the surf or on the jetties and some transfer to boats thereafter. landing in the surf is not a problem although you may have to walk a long way. the jetties are a little more difficult because landing spots are few and far between. if the big rods have a problem it is that they are somewhat cumbersome in a restricted area. however, most of the successful tarpon fishermen in texas are just leadering their fish anyway and are not concerned with an actual landing. the tarpon have only recently returned after an absence of over 50 years and most of the guys feel they are too important to waste. in fact, the laguna madre fly fishing association dropped the tarpon competition because we found landing and measuring to be to rough on the fish.
I believe that all of our fishing for Tarpon will be from boats. I plan to leader the fish if I hook one, because I don't want to hurt one for any photo op. I have been known to roll cast when a hooked fish gets close, to get the hook out his mouth. My son who is catch and release gets mad if I don't bring in a fish. He won't be there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
JD re " WUS "

You betcha, Red Ryder.

Wading for Reds, with alligators around, leaves some very tender and vital body parts in the water.
 

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JD
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gators

Although I have been known to wade when there was a (single) gator in site, I was a bit nervous about it. :eek: I had been told that thay are really afraid of people. But the key was to keep an eye on him. And be able to get out of the water if he can no longer be seen. :tsk_tsk: Used to catch them sunning themselves out in Lake George. Tried more than once to get close to one with the boat. Can't be done. They want no part of you.....In a boat anyway.:chuckle: Used to see pictures of Charlie Waterman wading and float tubing the Everglades. Braver man than I.:saeek:
 

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The latest in GATOR INFO

Subject: Florida Department of Fish and Wildlife ALLIGATOR ALERT!


The Florida Department of Fish and Wildlife is advising hikers, hunters, fishermen, golfers and tourist in general to take extra precautions and keep alert for alligators while in : Alachua, Marion, Lake, Collier, Lee, Seminole, Osceola, Polk, Brevard, Putnam and Orange counties.

They advise people to wear noise-producing devices such as little bells on their shoes or clothing to alert but not startle the alligators unexpectedly. They also advise the carrying of pepper spray in case of an encounter with an alligator.

It is also a good idea to watch for fresh signs of alligator activity. People should learn to recognize the difference between small young alligator and large adult alligator droppings.

Young alligator droppings are smaller and contain fish bones and possibly bird feathers. Adult alligator droppings have little bells in them and smell like pepper spray.
 

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Give me a break...

I grew up in Alachua and Seminole counties and believe the only thing that has changed is the number of people interacting with wildlife, not the alligators.

Chris
 
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Maybe you could get a TFO 12# Bluewater and extend the butt a little. It should work OK providing you are not looking to cast it a country mile. But you could certainly cast it 2 hands with an extended butt. MaxG
 
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