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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The other day, I was listening to a piece of music from the 17th century - the radio presenter was discussing this and made the comment that our understanding of how this should be sung was different from a few years ago. I got to thinking about "traditional speycasting".

What do we mean by it? A Scandinavian used to shooting heads would probably include any form of long line casting, including with the ultra-long belly lines in that definition, but with those lines has come a change of casting styles with the fast, flat style with V loops - not totally uninfluenced by the world of competition casting? Not too many years ago, Brits would probably have defined it as using casting using more through action rods, DT lines and longer casting strokes as opposed to shorter casting strokes that many of us became familiar with when using the newer shorter head speylines.
Again, my reading of that literature that I have here at home, including a review of videos/DVDs showing Jim Love, Andy Murray and descriptions of casting styles in the 1960's indicates that for many the accepted method of rod acceleration was top-hand dominant. Traditionalists often had a much lighter grip on the rod than one sees today.

But then again, which period are we looking at? I think that we can probably- in Europe - give credit to Hugh Falkus for his video that both demystified and popularised spey casting. And Michael Evans did much too. Both of these used the inboard swing, which may be known by Scots as the "Ghillie Style?".-But how many people use this today and associate it with long line casting?

Input please

Steven
 

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chrome-magnon man
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good topic!

This is muddy waters today. I talked with Nobuo Nodera about his style and he said he was influenced by Love. Nobuo actually doesn't hold the rod at all with the top hand--he just sort of cradles it there. It is really interesting to observe (he demonstrates this in his first video). That top hand dominant style and what Falkus was doing in his video is what I think of as "Traditional." Just to be confusing I call all of the newer stuff "Modern Traditional".

I would be quite happy referring to Traditional Speycasting as a generally top hand dominant style using long belly double taper floating and full sinking fly lines.

Oh, and you also have to wear a hat like Malcolm's (yes, I have one of those...two actually).
 

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chrome-magnon man
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still thinking

In the new RIO video, to kick off the Skagit Casting section the narrator says something to the effect that there are as many different interpretations of Skagit Casting as there are Skagit casters, and I think a similar statement can apply to "Traditional Speycasting".
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hi Dana,
It seems that there is not much around on the internet on this theme. I looked at Mike Maxwell's "Speyfishing" and there was no great help there. Then, I found an old thread on Speypages - from 2003 where Per Stadigh had referred to the scant mention of speycasting in the Trout and Salmon magazine between the 1960s and 1980s. Back to Hugh Falkus' book on Salmon Fishing (1984) where on page 200 he wrote that the overhead cast was the commonest cast to be seen - "the general inability to switch cast is unaccountable." This was also the theme in his video of around the same time. (He used switch cast to include both roll and spey casts).
Bruce Richards at SA tells me that it wasn't before the 1980's that SA developed a 40yd DT salmon line, which I suppose also indicates that the majority of salmon speycasters didn't cast as far as many expect to cast today? (Some obviously did: both Falkus and Ogilsby refer to bringing the back taper of the DT line (30 yard) line back down the rod rings).

Any Scots input on "traditional casting?". Any ideas on the origins of the casts that Falkus presented on his video:
a) the inboard swing (or Ghillie style)
b) the Reversed Casts, which Falkus maintained that he had never seen previously.

Regards
Steven
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Bob Pauli said:
Is a copy of Falkus's video available for borrow, rent or sale?
Bob
Bob, I assume that someone "over there" might be able to help you out, but if not please come back and I'll see what I can do.

I don't know what was available "over there" at the time (1983/1984), but Falkus' video was in my opinion the best of those available in the UK/Europe, and it bettered some that came later. He recognized that it would become outdated - hence his Speycasting book, but as with many videos of that period and later - and seen in the light of our undoubtedly enhanced performances both as casters and instructors - one will be able to identify things that would today be identified as casting faults! To mind comes the "Bloody L" (that mustbe one of Simon's terms?

Regards
Steven
 

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Bob ,
I have the video ,yours to borrow if you want, however it is in the UK format ,not sure if it would work over theere ,need to ask the boy who is far more teccie than me .
BTW fished a few days on Spey (wester Elchies and Criagallichie) last week ,all with a 40 yd DT SA intermediate . I do think would have covered one or two lies better with a IG65 hd still I did catch a few kelts .
 
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