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Discussion Starter #1
I'm seeking information regarding abrasion resistance, suppleness, breaking strength, knot strength, turnover capability, and elasticity differences between fluorocarbon, polyvinyl fluoride, and monofilament leader/tippet materials. Can these materials be used interchangeably with each other? What is polyvinyl fluoride? What are the advantages/disadvantages of braided leaders?
 

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Materials

I use a combination of mono and flourocarbon when tying my own leaders. I dont care for braided leaders too much when it comes to steelhead and salmon fishing. So far I have not run into any problems building tippets using a combination of mono and flouro. Do make sure you tie good knots and lubricate the heck out of them when you are using flourocarbon. Also some flourocarbon tends to be much better than others. Good Luck and Tight Lines.
 

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Tippet Material

Chromefever:

Thanks for your reply. Can you supply me with some information regarding abrasion resistance, suppleness, breaking strength, knot strength, turnover capability, and elasticity differences between fluorocarbon, polyvinyl fluoride, and monofilament leader/tippet materials. Although you state that you don't like braided leaders for salmon and steelhead fishing, just what are the advantages (if any) or disadvantages of using braided leaders in any fly fishing situation? Do you have any idea what polyvinyl fluoride material is?
 

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Materials

I prefer mono for constructing the butt sections of the leaders that I build because of the rigidity in the Maxima mono that I use. Very strong and very abrasion resistant. I use the flourocarbon for the tippet material only because of the strength and abrasion resistance and also the strength vs diameter of the line. Some quality flouro tends to have a much higher breaking threshold when comparing mono of the same diameter. And it is usually more supple. This way the butt section of the leader tends to be the stiffest material I can find and the tippet tends to be more flexible so that the entire system turns over properly and yet does not distort the action of the fly in the water. Most of the leaders that I make consist of 3-5 sections depending on the overall length of the leader and what technique I plan on using when fishing this leader. As for braided leaders and or using braided material I have not found a situation where I would feel the need to use it. Most braided material is too soft and flexible for use in the butt section of a leader and I see no reason to use it for tippet material. I have used a pre mfg'd tapered braided leader that I use when throwing poppers for bass when using a one handed rod. That is about the only time I use any sort of braded material for leaders and I still attach a section of flouro to the leader prior to attaching the fly.I am not sure what poly vinyl flouride is? Sounds like a new flooring product that is good for my dogs teeth when she chews it up!:chuckle:
 

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Re tippet

To get the type of info you want, you should contact the manufacturers directly. Most of us have our preferences but they are largely influenced by what is available, and what our friends use. Most of us don't select our tippet becasue of its abraision resistence!
For starters you could go to the Rio catalog at www.rioproducts.com and read what they say are the strengths of the 4 or 5 types of tippet they manufacture. Unfortunately they don't list the weaknesses. After you get some background info, contact them and others directly for more info.

If you have access to some old fishing magazines, there have been some articles about tippet. Authors have tested a certain sized tippet made by all manufacturers and written articles. Unfortunately I haven't seen one in the past 2 or 3 years.
 
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