Spey Pages banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Arthurs Seat
Hardy,Sharpes, Saracione ,Zwarg ,Carron.
Joined
·
334 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hello
can any give advice on tying the wings on the orange heron[b.e.p.].mine always seem to have a very high profile,the others i've seen sit very low,I just cant seem to get the wings to sit low across the back.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
hackle tip wings on orange heron

I had the same problem until I read John Shewey's new book on Steelhead Flies. He shows a technique where he folds back the barbules at the tie in point. This provides a foundation for tying in the wing and allows you to set the wing in a low tented configuration. Works great .....
 

·
Pullin' Thread
Joined
·
4,694 Posts
I've written about this before and a search for Orange Heron should come up with my fairly extensive how to on it.

However, for those who don't know how to use the search function, I will describe how to set the wings only. The secret to getting hackle tip wings to sit low on spey flies that use them, such as Glasso's Orange Heron, is tenting them. This is really not as tough as many think. The best feathers to use for hackle tip spey wings are rooster neck feathers. I personally prefer to use Whiting Amercian Hackle necks because of the their quality; but you could use Chinese necks or any other dyed rooster neck.

To get them tented and sitting low do the following: 1) strip most, but not all of the fibers off the butt of the hackle tips (making sure the wing length is between the barb and hook bend, not beyond the hook bend); 2) tie the wings in seperately with the far wing pair first and the near wing pair second; 3) tent the far wing toward you and tie it in with just 2 wraps of thread, remembering to tie the thread over a few barbs of the feathers; 4) adjust the wing length by pulling on the hackle stems; 5) you can also move the wing up or down on the hook sides by using your thumb and forefinger to gently push them; 6) make 2 more wraps of thread to firmly seat the far wing; 7) tie in the near wing with 2 wraps of thread and adjust its length and it verticle position on the hook as in #'s 4 and 5 above; 8) make 2 more wraps of thread to seat the near wing; 9) while holding onto the wings with your left thumb and forefinger, carefully cutt the wing butts very close to the thread (if you don't hold them with your left hand, the wing will move out of position); 10) put some cement on the now very short, clipped off wing butts; and 11) whip finish over them with a 6-8 turn whip finish (this is easiest to do with a Materelli style whip finisher). Whip finishing over the cemented wing butts produces a very strong fly with wings that don't pull out while having a fly with a nice, neat, and small head, just like Glasso did.

When tenting a wing pair, make sure the top edge of the wing tilts in toward the hook's center line and the bottom edge of the wing tilts out away from the hook slightly. When finished, the wings will have their top edges touching each other for about 1/2 the hook length (don't worry about the rear of them not touching. The finished wing will look somewhat like a dee wing; but the feather tips will not be very far apart, nor will they be as flat as a dee wing.

I hope this helps and is clear enough to follow.
 

·
Arthurs Seat
Hardy,Sharpes, Saracione ,Zwarg ,Carron.
Joined
·
334 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thanks

hey guys
thanks for the info,it's already helped for the last couple of ties.Checked them out in whats left of a quickly freezing river.Looked and swam great.
thanks again, James.
p.s. gonna be in Victoria next week and pondering between Cowichan or San Juan or the Gold do you think this fly pattern will work this time of year?
 

·
Pullin' Thread
Joined
·
4,694 Posts
Yes, it will work this time of year. In fact, Glasso designed it for winter steelhead and the only time I fish it is for winter fish.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
I've written about this before and a search for Orange Heron should come up with my fairly extensive how to on it.

However, for those who don't know how to use the search function, I will describe how to set the wings only. The secret to getting hackle tip wings to sit low on spey flies that use them, such as Glasso's Orange Heron, is tenting them. This is really not as tough as many think. The best feathers to use for hackle tip spey wings are rooster neck feathers. I personally prefer to use Whiting Amercian Hackle necks because of the their quality; but you could use Chinese necks or any other dyed rooster neck.

To get them tented and sitting low do the following: 1) strip most, but not all of the fibers off the butt of the hackle tips (making sure the wing length is between the barb and hook bend, not beyond the hook bend); 2) tie the wings in seperately with the far wing pair first and the near wing pair second; 3) tent the far wing toward you and tie it in with just 2 wraps of thread, remembering to tie the thread over a few barbs of the feathers; 4) adjust the wing length by pulling on the hackle stems; 5) you can also move the wing up or down on the hook sides by using your thumb and forefinger to gently push them; 6) make 2 more wraps of thread to firmly seat the far wing; 7) tie in the near wing with 2 wraps of thread and adjust its length and it verticle position on the hook as in #'s 4 and 5 above; 8) make 2 more wraps of thread to seat the near wing; 9) while holding onto the wings with your left thumb and forefinger, carefully cutt the wing butts very close to the thread (if you don't hold them with your left hand, the wing will move out of position); 10) put some cement on the now very short, clipped off wing butts; and 11) whip finish over them with a 6-8 turn whip finish (this is easiest to do with a Materelli style whip finisher). Whip finishing over the cemented wing butts produces a very strong fly with wings that don't pull out while having a fly with a nice, neat, and small head, just like Glasso did.

When tenting a wing pair, make sure the top edge of the wing tilts in toward the hook's center line and the bottom edge of the wing tilts out away from the hook slightly. When finished, the wings will have their top edges touching each other for about 1/2 the hook length (don't worry about the rear of them not touching. The finished wing will look somewhat like a dee wing; but the feather tips will not be very far apart, nor will they be as flat as a dee wing.

I hope this helps and is clear enough to follow.
Hi FT,
Following up further on your nicely detailed instructions. I am having a heck of a time getting the wings to remain in place - when I tighten the wraps, the wings end up rolling out of position. With four hackle tips, it seems that inevitably one goes out of position when I tighten. Does it help to having sufficient space at the head to begin with (i.e. bare wire or very light base of thread at the head)? Is there any other prep that helps?
Thanks.
 

·
Pullin' Thread
Joined
·
4,694 Posts
You should have a very small and thin layer of thread right in front of the fly's throat. This is where the wings are tied in because it forms a base for them. Then follow my previous instructions. Here are a few more nuances to tying tented hackle tip spey wings.

1) Tie the far wing pair in with 2-3 wraps of thread, adjust them for length and proper tenting if needed.

2) Tie in the near wing pair with 2-3 wraps of thread, adjusting them if needed to match the far wing pair.

3) Hold the wing between thumb and forefinger of your left hand (right hand if tying left-handed) and make 3 very tight wraps over the wing butts.

4) While still holding the wing with your left hand, cutt the wing butts as close to the thread as you can get without cutting the thread.

5) Add a drop of flexible cement (I like Flexament) to the wing butts and whip finish over the wing butts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
You should have a very small and thin layer of thread right in front of the fly's throat. This is where the wings are tied in because it forms a base for them. Then follow my previous instructions. Here are a few more nuances to tying tented hackle tip spey wings.

1) Tie the far wing pair in with 2-3 wraps of thread, adjust them for length and proper tenting if needed.

2) Tie in the near wing pair with 2-3 wraps of thread, adjusting them if needed to match the far wing pair.

3) Hold the wing between thumb and forefinger of your left hand (right hand if tying left-handed) and make 3 very tight wraps over the wing butts.

4) While still holding the wing with your left hand, cutt the wing butts as close to the thread as you can get without cutting the thread.

5) Add a drop of flexible cement (I like Flexament) to the wing butts and whip finish over the wing butts.
Thanks FT-it made all the difference. I have found the Glasso flies very useful as a learning pattern to improve my skills. There's so much to get right on these flies so I have found them frustrating and rewarding at the same time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
I found a great explanation with pictures on another blog. its at and helped me alot before I found this thread.

http://ukflydressing.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=teks&action=display&thread=1838[/URL]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
210 Posts
flytyer, thanks for the great tips in this thread.

I'm just learning this style and am finding the wings tricky. The one book I have on spey flies is John Shewey's. If I'm reading him correctly on page 84, he's advocating tying in all four feathers at once. You are obviously recommend tying in the pairs separately.

I'd love to hear more on why you tie in the pairs separately rather than all four feathers at once. I know my skill will increase with practice, I just want to make sure that I'm starting out with a method I'll stick with. thanks.

jeff
 

·
Pullin' Thread
Joined
·
4,694 Posts
Jeff-

I tie each pair in separately for several reasons:

1) It is very easy to get the proper tenting (tilt) of each wing pair when each side's pair is tied in separately;

2) When each pair is tied in separately, it is easy to make the small adjustments to the tenting, length of wing, and making sure each side is the same length that are inevitibly needed;

3) Less prep time is needed to make a good, properly tented and tied Glasso hackle tip wing;

4) It actually takes less thread to tie each wing pair separately.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top