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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

All my Spey fishing has been based on Skagit lines and I was now thinking of giving a Scandi a whirl.
But before I rush out and buy one I have a couple of questions.
The rods I now use are both Sage One 12'6 8 and 6 wts.
The first question is ,can you use T sinktips or MOW tips instead of polyleaders with a Scandi ?
I don't intend dredging the bottom or anything like that, just want to know if the Scandi will turn over efficiently a T sinktip.
The other question is,can you cast a biggish fly ,say a 2 1/2 inch fly (rabbit tail)?

Thanks
 

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Just my .02 cents here only.

Scandi=floating leader+a 'heavy' but not large fly.

Option 2 = sinking poly leaders + fly. Depending upon the fly they can be weighted, but a size 4 hook is going to be as big as I could handle.

In a nutshell (IMHO) Scandi's are for presentation, not chucking 'dead chickens.'
;)
 

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I started with skagit. The past couple of years I switched to the Rio Skandi body with the 15 ft versatips. I kinda look at it as between a skandi and a skagit. Its a little more graceful than a skagit. Plus the system has a floating, intermediate, and S4 bodies which will covered just about any situation you will come across. I love the system. So it may be something to consider coming from a skagit line. Rob
 

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A 5/6 or 6/7 scandi line with a 10 ft tip of say 65+- grain polyleader (which are tapered) and a reasonable fly will cast fine. I like 'em because you don't have to strip as much. Skagit (20ish foot head) for me is winter-only fishing with t-something. Otherwise, it's scandi (30ish foot head) or full line (55ish foot head) with a polyleader.

Have fun!
 

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I started with skagit. The past couple of years I switched to the Rio Skandi body with the 15 ft versatips. I kinda look at it as between a skandi and a skagit. Its a little more graceful than a skagit. Plus the system has a floating, intermediate, and S4 bodies which will covered just about any situation you will come across. I love the system. So it may be something to consider coming from a skagit line. Rob
Great advice !
 

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I guess my answer would be no and no, scandi casts polytips wonderfully I frequently use a 15' extra fast sinking tip with an unweighted fly and can get down enough. In my opinion it is a much more enjoyable line to cast and I find easier to mend less chuck and splash and perfect for more traditional type patterns. Give it a go I think you will like it.
 

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I started with skagit. The past couple of years I switched to the Rio Skandi body with the 15 ft versatips. I kinda look at it as between a skandi and a skagit. Its a little more graceful than a skagit. Plus the system has a floating, intermediate, and S4 bodies which will covered just about any situation you will come across. I love the system. So it may be something to consider coming from a skagit line. Rob
Diddo.......
 

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The Skagit lines you SA cast with 6wt rod are just fine for AA casts with 8wt rod!

A Skagit belly without tip with long mono leader is decent Underhand (Scandi) shooting head!

If you have assortment of Skagit tips you can build Scandi lines joining two or three of them!

Esa
 

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The Skagit lines you SA cast with 6wt rod are just fine for AA casts with 8wt rod!

A Skagit belly without tip with long mono leader is decent Underhand (Scandi) shooting head!

If you have assortment of Skagit tips you can build Scandi lines joining two or three of them!

Esa
Thats a great Idea. Light Skagits make great Scandi bodies.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
First of all, thanks for all your inputs .
I have a couple of more questions concerning scandi lines.
It was all straight forward based on the info given till I started reading about Rio Scandi bodies.
According to them they give scandi casting but allow you to attach MOW tips etc.
So my question is, is this line a kind of ' jack of all trades' but master of none?
Will it perform as good as a true scandi line or is it just a kind of hybrid between a skagit and a scandi?
Once again, thanks.
 

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Hi,

I can't comment on mow tips or poly leaders because I don't use them but....... Any time you move to a fly line with a longer belly you are going to have more ability to move that floating line around at will, aka mending. This allows for more control over the fly as it makes it's course on the swing. Everyone is different but I prefer longer lines so that I can entertain myself by exerting some level of control over each cast after the fly lands. Once you adapt to your new line you may find yourself curious about mid Spey types with 55' heads. With every ten foot of belly comes ten more foot of control :)
 

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It was all straight forward based on the info given till I started reading about Rio Scandi bodies.
According to them they give scandi casting but allow you to attach MOW tips etc.
So my question is, is this line a kind of ' jack of all trades' but master of none?
It's exactly what the box says -- the body, i.e., a scandi head with the tip cut off. You can re-attach any tip you like that is around the weight spec of the line. It will perform just as good as a 'true' scandi line, since, it is a true scandi line.

Skagit heads would be better off labeled as 'skagit bodies' or 'skagit bellies' since they really form the back/belly section of a full fly line, needing a tip added to complete the line. Floating scandis are often sold uncut.

The difference in a scandi body and a skagit body is that there is (usually, meaning, in all the ones I've examined) more weight in the back of the scandi. The tradeoff is, for the scandi, you'll need slightly less total weight in the belly to load a given rod. Obviously that weight comes from somewhere, that where is the front taper, which will usually be thinner at the end than the same-weight skagit and so works better with a little lighter tip. Where a skagit of the same belly weight might be good with T-14 you might go down to T-11 on the scandi, or from T-11 to T-8. This is something of a second-order effect, a skagit and a scandi that has been cut back a long way are pretty similar in behavior to first order. A full, uncut floating scandi head and a skagit of course behave very differently, this is where the skagit = heavy tip + heavy fly, scandi = polyleader + light fly thing comes from.
 

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With the rio skandi bodies I have no trouble turning over large or weighted flies using the 15ft versa tips. With the versatips I haven't seen any reason to go to mow / T- 8-14 tips as this line really shines with the versatips. This line will shoot a mile, no performance compromise there. I haven't even thought of using my skagit lines since going to this system 3 years ago. But its all a matter of personal preference. Rob
 
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