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Our last day in the Smithers area we drove up to the Babine.
There was a weather advisory with strong winds in the forecast, not to mention highs in the high 30s F, so we decided to not run the river and check out the upper Babine instead.

It was snowing on the way over and parts of the road were snowpacked and icy with other parts wet and slushy. This didn't slow the logging trucks down at all or pretty much anyone else on the road. I live in the northern Rockies of Montana and feel fairly confident about driving in bad conditions but the northern B.C. people drive WAY faster and are far more confident with bad road conditions than I am. We were both pretty amazed at the speed all the non-logging trucks were driving. Nothing surprises me anymore when it comes to how logging truck drivers drive, they pretty much own the road.

About 10k before the Babine bridge an RCMP vehicle goes flying by us, passing us in the muddy slush like it was nothing. He seemed like he was in a hurry to get somewhere up there in the middle of nowhere. When we got to the bridge we could see his vehicle parked just on the other side of it. We slowly drove across the bridge to look at the river, it being our first time up there, and there he was down in the water swinging a fly with a two-hander.

That an RCMP officer would take advantage of a lunch break (I assume..) to take a few casts wasn't so surprising, though certainly admirable, what was surprising is that he was wet wading. Seriously, he had pulled his uniform pants up over his knees and was wearing what looked like tennis shoes and he was wading up to his knees.
The water temps were in the low 40s. It was snowing with about an inch on the ground with air temps around freezing.

We stared at him from the bridge and he looked up at us and waved. Hardcore.

We went back to the parking area and geared up proper like and then walked back out on the bridge and he was about halfway down the run. Two guys from Smithers who had bushwacked out from downstream a ways joined us on the bridge to gawk at the officer wet wading in the snow.
I have to say I was impressed. That was some serious dedication to the cause right there.

He finished out the run and took off after about an hour. We were upstream at the time so I didn't get a chance to talk to him. I did swing up a nice hen a couple hours later though which pretty much made my day.
 

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Is going recreational fishing with an RCMP cruiser/vehicle an appropriate use of a piece of machinery owned by the Crown? I suppose if you can park at Tim Hortons for a doughnut and a coffee, why not? Wading wet in cold water is clearly the healthier option.

Maybe this is part of the reason why the second largest city in British Columbia affectionately known as Better Safe than Surrey just voted to terminate the contract with the RCMP and create a municipal police force. The guys and gals were spending all their time fishing!

No wonder if somebody phoned in a B&E being conducted with a stolen vehicle in broad daylight that no officers were available to take the call.....

In passing, Surrey is the targeted shooting capital of Canada. The Surrey Michael & Young fly shop is located in the north end of Surrey in a 'town centre' called Whalley. A few years back, while driving to M&Y, it was possible to see 3 or more cruisers flashing their lights while a bunch of folks were hand-cuffed while on their knees.
 

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"Is going recreational fishing with an RCMP cruiser/vehicle an appropriate use of a piece of machinery owned by the Crown? I suppose if you can park at Tim Hortons for a doughnut and a coffee, why not? Wading wet in cold water is clearly the healthier option."

"I'll bet a dollar to a Tim Horton's doughnut (pun intended), that RCMP doesn't have a valid fishing license."

In some places in BC and in Canada RCMP officers are on call 24 hours a day as back-up to the officers on shift. Usually smaller communities with only a handful of members stationed there.Response time required is around 15- 20 minutes. They drive the RCMP units so they can have their kit with them if needed. It's not optional in most cases.

As for not having a fishing license - well that just a stupid comment.

Yea I support the RCMP. Also not and option. Married to one and know the s#*t they can go though day to day in small communities where a day off is a rare treat.
 

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"Is going recreational fishing with an RCMP cruiser/vehicle an appropriate use of a piece of machinery owned by the Crown? I suppose if you can park at Tim Hortons for a doughnut and a coffee, why not? Wading wet in cold water is clearly the healthier option."

"I'll bet a dollar to a Tim Horton's doughnut (pun intended), that RCMP doesn't have a valid fishing license."

In some places in BC and in Canada RCMP officers are on call 24 hours a day as back-up to the officers on shift. Usually smaller communities with only a handful of members stationed there.Response time required is around 15- 20 minutes. They drive the RCMP units so they can have their kit with them if needed. It's not optional in most cases.

As for not having a fishing license - well that just a stupid comment.

Yea I support the RCMP. Also not and option. Married to one and know the s#*t they can go though day to day in small communities where a day of is a rare treat.
Good point.
It's easy to criticize without understanding what their life can be like. They're never called because things are going well...much of their job entails saving idiots from themselves. We need to cut them some slack. Good on him for grabbing fishing time when he can get it. I'm sure, when his radio goes, he'll be off to deal with a less enjoyable situation.
 

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I fished the skeena with an rcmp officer this fall, his detachment - town were burnt in the fires this year, he was in terrace to escape the fires.
He didn't seem to be in any hurry to put his rod away and return. Great guy and very helpful.
 

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....We need to cut them some slack. .....
No we do not. As a general rule, public sector and para-public sector workers should be held to a higher standard. That particularly applies to police.

In this case of the RCMP officer grabbing a few minutes of steelhead fishing, who cares but otherwise, if you believe in a well-financed public sector that provides quality services, many of which are complimentary to the private sector's activities, maintaining standards and maintaining a good reputation is important.
 

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Im not sure a mountie fishing is going to undermine their reputation or lose the public's trust. We have no knowledge of why he was up there. Maybe he was sent on a call and told to stand down, maybe he was having lunch before he drove back. Fact he was wet wading in snow shows he is hard core fisher. If you think Surrey is poorly policed maybe you should think about how it would be with out them.Ive found police to be people just like everyone else,treat them with respect and you get it back,dont and what do you expect.I worked for years doing road maintenance and as a volunteer fireman and have seen what these guys and girls do and what they get called out too day or nite, day after day . I think cutting a bit of slack might be ok. Next time we need some help it might be a cop that is there to give it. They aren,t all perfect but they all show up when called on,and a lot of those calls aren,t something most people would want to be be doing. Hope he caught a fish. Daryl
 

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Many years ago I was at the Potato Patch on the Kispiox and an argument was getting going between a First Nations woman and two fishermen from Italy about camping fees.
The RCMP were called by the woman and an officer arrived soon after.

I was standing nearby and the officer talked softly to the woman and calmed her down.
He knew how sensitive the land claims issues are in the area.

Then he went over to the fishermen, detected their Italian accented English and began speaking to them in Italian.
I was floored as were the Italians and the woman.
Money was happily paid by the Italians to the woman for camping fees and all was peaceful.

I walked over to the officer to say hello and thank him.
Turns out his parents were from Italy and he grew up speaking the language.

Only in Canada!
 

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When I first read this thread I immediately thought of the gentleman I fished with, I'm sure it was him.
Yes people have no idea what these officers go thru in these one horse towns in the middle of the bush, with only a few officers to handle whatever comes there way, and being so remote, it's not like they have backup at a moments notice.
People in these remote communities tend to take the law into their own hands.
Not an easy job being a police officer with mediate backup a radio call away, never mind an rcmp in a Wild West remote community where no one is coming anytime soon.
 
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