Spey Pages banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Norwegian speyfanatic
Joined
·
197 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This book is on my wish list, but I see that there are different versions. Anybody know if the 1972 versions has something left out? The 1972 version has 277 pages while the 1935 version has 472 pages. Which should I buy, the original, the revised or both?

Kind regards,
Oddbjørn Midbø
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
124 Posts
Hi Oddbjørn,

I haven't seen the original version, but the 1972 revised edition supposedly contains the original text with revisions/additions. Scott (Rudd) as the author of Fine and Far Off mentions in this book that he thought that both the Grant and Laming techniques were more or less unknown until 1952 so these wouldn't have been mentioned.
Be aware that whereas Fine and Far Off concentrated on Grant and fly fishing/Grant's Switch, that Salmon Fishing discusses all legal techniques and tackle used for salmon fishing in the UK of 1972. However, there are chapters that specifically address a) Sunk Fly Fishing b) Floating Line Fishing c) Dry Fly Fishing.
The chapter on fly casting is pretty cursory: whilst 6+ pages are spent on Overhead casting with the two handed rod, only 1+ page is given to "Switch Casting in the Highland Style" (which is notthe style he describes at length in Fine and Far Off, but for which he recommends a Single Tapered line and oscillating rod rings, which as you will recall were a specific feature of Grant's Vibration rods. He then gives 2+ pages on the Single Spey and just less than 2 pages on the Double Spey.

Actually, reading page 88 on the Double Spey there again is an indication (see thread on Underhand Casting) of how some people cast before (1972) "If you wish to use this cast and are still fishing from the left bank, you must place the left hand uppermost on the rod and the right hand underneath the button. The left hand will do the work of guiding, controlling and propelling.

If you'd like to look at the book give me a call.

Regards
Steven
 

·
Norwegian speyfanatic
Joined
·
197 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you guys.

What made me interested in the book is that it's the only book (after my knowledge) that writes about the techniques of Ernest Crossfield.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
124 Posts
Others can confirm whether the original version contains any reference to him: there are 2 in the 1972 version.

Page 133 refers to his technique of keeping the fly near the surface by pulling the line in by hand, and remarks that this was the same as floating the line as far as depth was concerned. (One paragraph - 80 words).

Page 179 on Salmon Flies agained has one reference to the technique of pulling throughwhich was Crosfield's name for Wood's technique of getting a large fly to move significantly faster through slower water. (This was achieved by swinging the rod point in towards the bank or retrieving line. Crosfield apparently used it in the summer when he wanted his fly nearer the surface.

What might be of interest to you, if you haven't heard of it before is the fly that is detailed on page 323 of Bates' Atlantic Salmon flies and fishing. Bates wrote that this Icelandic pattern - although misspelt may be one of Crosfield's patterns as it was simple:

Head colour: Black
Tag: A few turns of round or overal silver tinsel
Tail: a Golden Pheasant Crest feather
Body: Embossed silver tinsel
Throat: Few turns of medium blue hackle applied as a collar, pulled down and tied back slightly.
Wing: Underwing of strips of brown Turkey or Mallard: an outerwing of strips of barred black and white Teal which veils the underwing.

Regards
Steven

Crossfield (Iceland)
 

·
Norwegian speyfanatic
Joined
·
197 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Steven Mear said:
Others can confirm whether the original version contains any reference to him: there are 2 in the 1972 version.

Page 133 refers to his technique of keeping the fly near the surface by pulling the line in by hand, and remarks that this was the same as floating the line as far as depth was concerned. (One paragraph - 80 words).

Page 179 on Salmon Flies agained has one reference to the technique of pulling throughwhich was Crosfield's name for Wood's technique of getting a large fly to move significantly faster through slower water. (This was achieved by swinging the rod point in towards the bank or retrieving line. Crosfield apparently used it in the summer when he wanted his fly nearer the surface.

What might be of interest to you, if you haven't heard of it before is the fly that is detailed on page 323 of Bates' Atlantic Salmon flies and fishing. Bates wrote that this Icelandic pattern - although misspelt may be one of Crosfield's patterns as it was simple:

Head colour: Black
Tag: A few turns of round or overal silver tinsel
Tail: a Golden Pheasant Crest feather
Body: Embossed silver tinsel
Throat: Few turns of medium blue hackle applied as a collar, pulled down and tied back slightly.
Wing: Underwing of strips of brown Turkey or Mallard: an outerwing of strips of barred black and white Teal which veils the underwing.

Regards
Steven

Crossfield (Iceland)
Than you, Steven

Also Bob Veverka mention that Blue Charm is probably a fly of Ernest Crossfield. He also says that the most important with salmon fishing by Eric Taverner is what he writes about Crossfield.

Maybe there just are not any more information about this great man's contributions to our sport?
 

·
Pullin' Thread
Joined
·
4,694 Posts
The Blue Charm was around long before Crossfield was alive. It was also tied with either black floss or dark claret floss bodies.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top