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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After what seemed like an interminable winter, the trout Spey season, at least here in northern Colorado, has begun - flows have come up just enough to keep lines and flies swinging and the fish, I'm pleased to report, have started eating. I managed to convince a trio of fish to eat a Spey-style Autumn Splendor (I know, it's not autumn, but it works) and, then, on whim, tied on a black Double-Deceiver (my current favorite fly for single-handed outings) and they pounced on that too. We didn't have a great snow year, so the optimal window for swinging flies might be short, but it's definitely going to be a fun one.

One question for the more experienced trout group - I was swinging flies during a pretty epic BWO hatch (and taking perverse pleasure in catching them on streamers), but I'm curious what flies you might swing during such an event if you didn't feel the need to catch them on something big and fish-like. I thought about swinging a soft hackle but didn't have anything smaller than a size 10, so I just stuck with the streamers.
 

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I'd reach for either a small soft hackle/emerger (size 8 to 14) on a floating or intermediate tip, or a waking/skating fly of similar size (Thompson river caddis, greaseliner, skittering caddis, anything foam) on a floating tip. The fish are looking up, so anything in the film or on the surface would be a good bet. At least on my local waters, I haven't found the fish to be super picky about size, so I'll reach for something high floating and quite visible if I'm fishing on the surface.

We have a long, almost glassy pool here, that holds quite a lot of trout in the late spring and early summer. I cast my skaters out about 90 degrees, let it dead drift down until the line comes tight, then skate it across to the hang down. I don't mend in this situation, as the bit of belly in the line keeps the fly moving at a reasonable pace through the fairly slow pool. I've taken trout anywhere from right as the fly hits the water across stream, to the hang down with this method. You'll have to set the fly like fishing a one-hander on the dead drift part, but when the line comes tight, the trout will tackle the fly and do all the work themselves. I've even taken a couple smallies this way as well.
 

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Yes the streamer bite has turned on here too. Last week I used sculpin-colored streamers (olive-brown over tan and white) in the 2-3" range. Had some luck both swinging and jigging. However my most productive technique that day was cast upstream and start stripping back down a little faster than the current. The browns were nailing it, sometimes on back to back casts which is not usually my experience fishing streamers. Was using a 10' 3wt single hander and either full intermediate line to swing or euro nymph line to jig/strip...just depends on the run which setup I pick.

I also saw some bank risers probably BWO but didn't have any small stuff with me.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Waters are slowly rising and the big fires we had last year are making their presence felt as we’re starting to see more ash and sediment coming down my local river.
I worked the mainstem for a while without a bump (too murky?) and then ducked into a slightly clearer trib where I found some brown trout that were willing to play.
379710
Not a giant but fun.
 

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I got out for a first day of trout spey and again was surprised at how much more fun I have using spey rods and casts for trout. Wether swinging or nymphing. Caught some nice ones.
 
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