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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Using Brian Silvey's inventive and proven Tandem Tube method, I have been working on yet another Intruder type pattern. My goal was to create a fly to use in higher, turbid winter flows that had the fluid movement of a Rabbit Leech, the large profile of an Intruder, was easy to cast and could be made with relatively inexpensive natural materials. By using 2 short tubes I was able to construct a 4 " segmented fly with the tubes connected by a 2" thin rabbit strip.

The results so far have been good as far as ease of casting, nice movement and a good 1" diameter profile. The only negative is that it takes 16 steps to tie but I enjoy it. Here is the recipe and a Quicktime slideshow of the tying steps. Any feedback about the design or suggestions for improvements are welcome. I am working on version that has a deer hair collar like Ed Ward's original. As far as rigging is concerned I prefer straight eye hooks (thanks Ed) and rig it with a non-slip loop knot that passes thru the rear tube and butts up against the front tube keeping the fly at it's full length at all times and never fouls. Something about this fly gets my adrenaline going when I see it in the water. I am waiting for final confirmation of the above from a winter fish.

Rear section instructions:
Step 1: Cut a small Frodin tube into two 1" sections and place one in vise.
Step 2: Make a dubbing ball with Electric Blue Lite Brite material.
Step 3: Add Kingfisher Blue Schlappen hackle
Step 4: Add Black Schlappen hackle
Step 5: Add Blue Guinea hackle collar
Step 5: Add Blue Stippled Ostrich (use a black Sharpie) above and below
collar
Step 6: Tie on the rear end of a 2 " Black Rabbit strip (apply drop a of super
glue gel first) whip finish,remove from vise, replace with 2nd tube.
Front section instructions:
Step 7: Attach front of Rabbit Strip to rear of tube
Step 8: Make another dubbing ball with Lite Brite
Step 9: Add Kingfisher Blue Schlappen hackle
Step 10: Add Black Schlappen hackle
Step 11: Add Smolt blue Krystal Flash on the underside.
Step 12: Add a wispy Black Marabou plume
Step 13: Add 4 Natural variegated Saddle Hackle tips to each side.
Step 14: Add Blue Guinea hackle collar
Step 15: Add Blue Stippled Ostrich on top and below collar
Step 16: Dub a small Black head, whip finish, cement.
 

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I can understand the concept of a segmented or articulated fly, and the method described seems to show that, when you set aside all the dressing materials save the 2 x 1" plastic tubes, and the connecting 2" rabbit strip, you will end up with a construction which is 2 x 1", plus 2" rabbit strip, minus length of rabbit strip used at each end to tie onto the adjacent tube segments, ie total length is just a shade shorter than 4".

However, add the tail materials for the rear tube section, and the profile will significantly exceed the 4" - ie from head to tail tip.

I can see that the rabbit strip connecting the 2 tube segments together will, when under tension, will keep the fly construct at its full length.

However, what I have a problem in understanding is how you keep the two tubes from collapsing together - towards each other - when fishing on the swing. The tubes are slid onto the leader, and you form your non-slip loop, attach the 'stinger' hook to the loop, and off you go. But in the water, the non-rigid rabbit strip doesn't hold the tubes apart, it just prevents them from getting further apart when tensioned or stretched. The leader passing through both tubes and onward to the non-slip loop & then the hook will be, say 10 to 15lb maxima, which is not rigid either. I see nothing else between the 2 tube segments which holds the segments apart.

In the water, holding the fly line, & via the tip, through to the leader, the top section of tube will be pushed downstream, relative to the rear tube section, and the length of the fly construction will collapse in length.

Am I missing something???:confused:

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Mike,

Thanks for your detailed reply. Let me try to explain the rigging better.
Creating a non-slip loop knot or a triple surgeons loop that is slightly longer than the rabbit strip allows you to slide the loop end thru the front of the rear tube and the then feed the tippet end into the rear of the front tube and out the front. Under tension the knot end of the loop will be pulled against the rear end of the front tube preventing the fly from collapsing onto itself. To put it simpler, the loop knot is placed in between the 2 tubes and not at the end of the rear tube.
I hope this helps. This is a proven system created by PNW guide Brian Silvey and it is used on his commercially tied Tandem Tube flies.
 

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Miguel,

lovet he tie, and hard to beat the black/blue color scheme. what is the advantange of using the two tube method over just using one tube? i assume it swims better, but are there other advantages? again, great pattern.
 

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Got it now, Miguel; means (very clever this, I think) that your effectively fishing the top tube and the rear tube is 'dropped off the back of that' via the rabbit strip. Neat!

Thanks for the clarity of explanation, and the tie itself is very nice - Steelhead colours - but colour schema is something separate to the illustration of the method.

Thanks for sharing!

Mike
 

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that is very Sweet! I have a question though. Rather than using rabbit alone for connection of both tubes together like you did, would it be better to connect a flexible tubing between the tubes and then connect the rabbit or none for more durability?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
that is very Sweet! I have a question though. Rather than using rabbit alone for connection of both tubes together like you did, would it be better to connect a flexible tubing between the tubes and then connect the rabbit or none for more durability?
Since the line is running thru the tubes, it takes most of the force of the cast and not the rabbit strip, the fly is just along for the ride and is actually somewhat reinforced by the line. I am sure some dacron line would make it more durable for sure, I just wanted to keep the design as uncomplicated as possible as it has enough steps already. If I begin to experience detachments with the components I may have to consider this option. I will have too see what happens after a big winter buck decides to destroy it....Thanks for the input.
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Non slip mono knot

Will the non slip mono knot and loop prevent the tube from riding up the leader when hooked?

Would you have a pic of your rigging to see?
 

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Yup

Sushi, I use silvey's tandem tubes ... just got two steelhead with it.
IF you use a small front tube such as a liner tube or the xsmall froden or guideline tubing and at least 10# maxima ultragreen then a "non slip mono loop" or Kreh loop (slightly different) works well and won't pull through the front tube. Just tie the loop so it hangs down through the back tube and then if you have an up eye hook, snell the hook on the loop.

When the fish is hooked the fly should be able to "move up" the leader as the back tube is a larger diameter than the front loop and the knot can slip through it. Usually it doesn't go up much ... just moves up closer to the front tube ... no worries about the fly causing the hook to hinge out. The rabbit is very flexable.

Miguel, GREAT FLY and application of the tandem tube concept.
I'm going to give this a try ... VERY Cool.

Steve Egge
 
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