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Discussion Starter #4
THanks guys. I am considering a Loop classic 7-9 but don't know about the quality of the reel. I am also looking at other reel options. Suggestions needed? Thanks . How and the heck due you stop an atlantic salmon on a Hardy Marquis 2 reel?
 

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For spey, my Redington Behemoth and Redington Brakewater reels are the best for the money!
I also have awesome Ross CLA 7 reels...
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I considered the Hardy Perfect 4 1/4 but how to they work on atlantic salmon. No palming rim to slow fish down. How do you guys control a 40 pound salmon with this type of reel?
 

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THanks guys. I am considering a Loop classic 7-9 but don't know about the quality of the reel. I am also looking at other reel options. Suggestions needed? Thanks . How and the heck due you stop an atlantic salmon on a Hardy Marquis 2 reel?
Loop Classic reels are very well built !!
I speak from experience since I had the original Loop Classic, not much has changed between the old Classics and new Classics, just the porting (I like the old version better).

The Hardy Marquis is like any other G&P reel, it is equipped with the most versatile, self adjusting drag system in the world .... the palm of your hand !!
Pressure can be adjusted instantly as the angler sees fit. Ultra smooth too, especially with a wet wool glove :smokin:
Same as the Hardy Perfect reel, it has a rotating backplate that you apply finger tip pressure.
This is how I palm my Olson reel. It too has a rotating backplate.

The G&P reel is not for everyone, however it does add to the personal feel during the screaming runs of both steelhead and salar :D


Mike
 

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You 'finger' the inside of the spool or the outside of the spool, it's fun.
The largest steelhead I've ever land, around 32#, was on a Hardy Marquis Salmon 3. There is always some luck involved in landing big fish on any fly reel. I've lost a few very large steelhead using disc drag reels. It wouldn't have mattered what kind of reel or rod weight you are using if you get into an unlandable fish, especially near the tail out and it leaves the pool and you can't follow it, adios muchacho.
 

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I considered the Hardy Perfect 4 1/4 but how to they work on atlantic salmon. No palming rim to slow fish down. How do you guys control a 40 pound salmon with this type of reel?
I use a 3 3/4 perfect. I find the clean side plate much more effective for adding drag than palming a rim, as there is a lot more surface area to engage with. When a fish runs my hand slides from the handle to cupping the reel, my fingers pressed against the plate, without really thinking about it.

I have a few nice drag reels (Bauer and Nautilus) and don't find any real difference in landing rates (largest steelhead to date approx 25 lbs). I do find my level of engagement and overall fun is much higher with the Perfect style, feeling like there is more demanded of me.
 

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I fish all of these on my 13 and 13.5' rods.

Olson 3 3/4" Raised Pillar (Silver on bottom)
Saracione 3 3/4" MK IV (Gold)
Olson 4" Raised Pillar (Silver w/ Black sideplates in middle)

BTW - a 4 1/4 Perfect is a BIG reel and in my opinion way to much for a 13' rod. I do occasionally use a 4" Perfect on a 13 though and while a bit large/heavy it is serviceable.
 

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Hi,

I started out salmon fishing with spring & pawl reels and while I was in a stage of inexperience I believed I needed something with a drag. The early disc systems with offset cogs provided more resistance than my clicker and when the draw bar / cork systems came out I had those. Time went on and I learned that in all but extreme cases it is the angler who handles the hooked fish not his reel. Once that milestone was reached I went back to my clickers.

Currently I have a number of rod in the 13 - 14' length and these are reels I use for king salmon as well as other species.

Hardy Taupo - Hardy 4 1/4" wide spool - Orvis Vortex 11/12 & 9/10 - Sage Domain #10 - Hardy Uniqua large arbor circa 2009 - Sage Evoke #10

I like the Perfects but matched newer rods with newer technology reels. Two years ago while testing to see if an 11'6" Hardy Swift 7 weight with the Taupo would handle kings I landed a 53 pound male. It was an accident because I had no idea that fish was in the run / pool. That took a while, not due to the reel but because my rod was not strong enough to lift and move that fish. I just wrote an article onto my own website about hooking and landing salmon. If you know my name you can find it if you wanted. I won't link because I consider that bad manners unless I were a sponsor. The gist of the writing is all about handling a hooked fish, it isn't all reel and drags.
 

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Put a Farlex 4" S Handle Multiplier on my MKS 13689 this year for boar kings this past season and I'm in hog heaven,Love the multiplier with big fish. Tim is a great guy, builds great reels and takes good care of his customers. Don't think I'll be changing this set-up any time soon.


Enjoy The Spey Journey,
sixheads
 

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On an 8 wt 13' my favorite is still a 4" perfect,and I really like a salmon #2 as well. I like a st. Aidan on a 13' 6 wt, or a Taupo where I think the Aidan actually wins there for a nice sound. Maybe that wouldn't be true on with some of the older Taupos, I don't know.

I feel like while there may be a steelhead out there that would overwhelm a perfect, or a situation where I would have to land one 18 pounder after another, after another, I'm provisionally confident that I don't NEED a drag yet, though I would love to get proved wrong!
 

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You will discover that there are basically two schools of thought on spey reels. The first is gear and pawl (clicker) reels. These reels are generally simple with an exposed palming rim on the handle side of the spool. Hardy Perfects and clones of that design have a plate that rotates with the spool on the backside of the reel you can also finger for drag. The other reel type are those with a variable drag operated by a knob of some kind. Each has its benefits and detriments. The only disadvantage I have found with clickers is that a wet glove gives much lower drag than a dry hand so during the winter you may have to press harder to obtain the same level of drag. For more complex variable drag reels a wide array of bad things can happen, from wet cork suddenly drying and drag getting too high to ratchet catches that fail, turning your reel into a dragless centerpin and your line into a birds nest. I do most of my fishing with such reels but also spend time maintaining them in good working order having lost several fish due to reel failures. My advice is to look for a used Hardy Perfect and learn how to use it. It's a very smart, reliable design.
 

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JD
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You will discover that there are basically two schools of thought on spey reels. The first is gear and pawl (clicker) reels. For more complex variable drag reels a wide array of bad things can happen, from wet cork suddenly drying and drag getting too high to ratchet catches that fail, turning your reel into a dragless centerpin and your line into a birds nest. I do most of my fishing with such reels but also spend time maintaining them in good working order having lost several fish due to reel failures.
Bauer M6 Classics.
Cork drags do not suddenly dry out! They dry out over an extended period of non maintenance. A dried out cork drag will absorb water like a sponge if dunked, if this then freezes, you will then have ice against a slick surface resulting in a free spinning spool. A properly saturated cork drag will prohibit penetration of water. I have found once per season to be more than adequate.
 
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