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I'm struggling to find a solution when tying step-tube flies that prevents the tube from spinning on the needle.

I've tried various needles (felting to vise kits) with no luck.

My basic tube combination is:

Soft Junction Tubing (for hook eye) >> 3mm tube for body >> 1.8mm for conehead seat/fit


The only reason i'm stepping the tube is for the cone heads as more seem to be available with the small hole over those that fit on the 3mm tube.

Any ideas, suggestion on how to hold stepped tubes better?
 

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I used to use a bicycle spoke as a mandrel when I used to use large air line tubing. I ground the spoke down to the required diameter and used the nut to crank the tube down tight...Don't know if this will work in your situation but for large I.D tubing it worked very well...
 

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they are a few solution to prevent twisting of 3mm tube
I always melt little bit 1,8mm tubing before put in to bigger tube after that I compress bigger tube by 20-30 turns of thread .
you can see tis on Jaap's facebook
https://www.facebook.com/skeenarive...0713113627669/830643676967946/?type=1&theater
with using tube vise instead of needle you use mandrel.
this way bigger tube can not turn.
Is also possible to use instead cones with 2mm hole cones 3mm

https://www.facebook.com/skeenarive...0713113627669/830645540301093/?type=1&theater

such construction is much stronger but still is good to use 1,8mm tube for blocking loop of leader
 

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A couple of other possibilities...

I tie a lot of tube flies, many of them on nested Euro-tubing, the 3.0 and 1.8 mm sizes that you mentioned. I have had success using the HMH tube fly adapter and the stepped needles by FITS and Pro Sportsfisher. I mount the junction tubing after the fly is finished. I slide the 3.0 mm tube on first making a tight friction fit. The 1.8 tube is either nested completely or joined by thread wraps after angle cuts on the two tubes at the join. The needle is put into the adapter close to the butt end of the 3.0 tube, leaving the room necessary for the junction tube, then tightened down. The long trough of the adapter puts pressure on the bottom of the 3.0 tube and rotation is never a problem. Alternately I use the Pro Sportsfisher needle which has a round shaft tapering to a rectangular bar. The “shoulders” of the rectangular bar have enough bite in the 3.0 tube to prevent rotation. I use this needle in my Renzetti Clouser vise. It also works in the HMH adapter. I have a BAG full of round needles and mandrels and felting needles that sort of work but with much swearing. The felting needles and the Norling needle work okay on 1.8 mm tubing and lined metal tubes. Overall I have to say that the HMH adapter is THE tool for me. I have tried many purpose-made tube fly vises...Eumer, HMH, Renzetti, Dyna-King, Stonfo and so on...none work as well as the simple HMH adapter. John Gray, a tier in Scotland who specializes in needle tube flies (1.5 mm in diameter...yikes) now recommends and uses the HMH tool after designing and selling his own pin-vise style of tube vise (chuck and collet) from his shop for a number of years. Cheers, Buff.
 

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the see is usually better than to reed :)



if we do not like use tube vise or another tube devise
very good solution is to use blind eye hook polished by sand paper to needed taper



completely the same I do with needles. I made longer or shorter cone because I like when only short piece of needle is in front of fly

 

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Spinning Tubes – prevention of

Stepped tube assembly:



Examples of 1.5, 1.8 & 3.0mm od plastic (aka Scandinavian) tubes, and metal crimps



1.5mm od poly tube with metal crimps



Coneheads with needle file to expand the drilled hole in the conehead



Coneheads on the 1.5 and 1.8 tubing



Heat flared end of the 1.8 tube vs the 3.0 tube



Slide the 1.8 tube into the 3.0 tube



Pull the 1.8 tube through the 3.0 tube and the flare on the end of the 1.8 tube is secured and gripped inside the 3.0 tube



The assembled stepped tube
 

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continued:



With the added conehead



With the added conehead snugged down to the end of the 3.0 tube



A few stepped tubes made up, ready for tying onto



Examples of 4 pins for securing plastic tubes onto: from top to bottom is shown the stepped pin, the felting needle, a crochet hook, and a blind eye hook



4 different sizes of steel crochet hooks

For stepped tubes, as above, the crochet hook had just the right taper to allow secure fixation of the stepped tube, as it grips the inside of both the 3.0 tube and the 1.8 tube, so it won’t spin.

Mike
 

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Hi guys, interesting question and some interesting answers. As they say: "there are many roads that lead to Rome". I prefer to clamp the tube down, with a mandrel inside the tube. The good old HMH tube adapter works great for that. I have only one issue with it, it is a bit problematic to have a true rotisserie function with it. I now prefer a chuck type vise, that allows the tube to be fed through. I place the tube on a hard steel mandrel, with no taper. Once clamped down in the chuck it will never move. It also allows me to use full length tubes without pre-cutting them, which is nice for production work. The advantage over the HMH clamp is that it is true rotisserie.
 

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If the problem is the tube slipping on the needle/mandrel you can wind on a layer or two of thread to build up the diameter of the needle while giving it a higher friction surface. a little super glue on the thread makes it a semi permanent solution (you can razor the thread off easily).

I got this idea from the Norvise tube fly videos, so you might look at them for a better illustration of the idea.
 
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