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There are healthy populations of steelhead and a small but dedicated group of anglers that have been fishing them on certain river systems in PEI. For whatever reason they don’t seem to attain the size of the steelhead in the Great Lakes or out west - but interesting to know that there are populations of Atlantic steelhead.
 

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A couple streams in Quebec have had them for years. Originally introduced via stocked ponds where floods would break the dam IIRC. Odd that they have not colonized streams on the lower St. Lawrence as rainbows can be aggressive colonizers like their Pacific salmon brethren.

Out of curiosity, is anybody still farming Pacific salmon -- coho and rainbow/steelhead -- in Atlantic Canada? Always thought that was a very ecologically risky activity.

Farmed Atlantic salmon on the other hand are like folks who have not done any exercise in half a century. Vulnerable and weak, and incapable of establishing new runs.
 

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As it turns out, steelhead may not be great at colonizing new places nor are other Pacific salmonids except Kings. The coast of Chile and the coast of Argentina are good examples. Attempts have been made for over 100 years and to the best of my knowledge, there is only one stream in Argentina that has a significant steelhead population (McCloud river strain) and I have yet to hear of one in Chile. The same can be said for Atlantics in Argentina and Chile. I seem to remember a paper about more flexible genetics in Kings that allows them to adapt to local conditions. They have spread over quite a few drainages in Chile and spawn in the Argentina headwaters of westward draining systems.

Maybe someone knows whether the salmon runs in New Zealand are Kings or some other type of salmon.
 

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They don't like rainbow truut on the salmon rivers in QC:

We remind you that the purpose of this fishing is to remove the rainbow trout before they go up in the river. Rainbow trout are an exotic species on the Matane River and are considered harmful to salmon, hence the importance of fishing them.
 

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As it turns out, steelhead may not be great at colonizing new places nor are other Pacific salmonids except Kings. The coast of Chile and the coast of Argentina are good examples. Attempts have been made for over 100 years and to the best of my knowledge, there is only one stream in Argentina that has a significant steelhead population (McCloud river strain) and I have yet to hear of one in Chile. The same can be said for Atlantics in Argentina and Chile. I seem to remember a paper about more flexible genetics in Kings that allows them to adapt to local conditions. They have spread over quite a few drainages in Chile and spawn in the Argentina headwaters of westward draining systems.

Maybe someone knows whether the salmon runs in New Zealand are Kings or some other type of salmon.
New Zealand salmon are Kings but due to sea conditions and food resource fish are smaller, a decline in the last decade sadly. Spawning and smolt habitat has diminished greatly also.
Same old excuse a "complex issue" .... always when there is money and profits involved, farmers and irrigation schemes and humans still demanding to catch and kill the last remaining
fish still running....enough said :rolleyes:
 

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I am not convinced the PEI Steelhead started as being native to the area.... No [proof but have my doubts
 

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As it turns out, steelhead may not be great at colonizing new places nor are other Pacific salmonids except Kings. The coast of Chile and the coast of Argentina are good examples. Attempts have been made for over 100 years and to the best of my knowledge, there is only one stream in Argentina that has a significant steelhead population (McCloud river strain) and I have yet to hear of one in Chile. The same can be said for Atlantics in Argentina and Chile. I seem to remember a paper about more flexible genetics in Kings that allows them to adapt to local conditions. They have spread over quite a few drainages in Chile and spawn in the Argentina headwaters of westward draining systems.

Maybe someone knows whether the salmon runs in New Zealand are Kings or some other type of salmon.
Chinook are indeed aggressive, successful colonizers. Borders on scary. Many attempts were made to introduce sea-going Atlantic salmon in the southern cone but similar to elsewhere in the world: zero success.

I am not aware of numerous attempts to introduce sea-going steelhead in Argentina and Chile. Has anybody documented those? Aside from the successful establishment McCloud river strain steelhead in the rio Santa Cruz though I wonder if the original introducers were attempting to establish a sea-going population of steelhead or simply non-anadromous 'rainbow trout'

Question: Were the rainbows that populate streams in Tierra del Fuego of McCloud river steelhead origin? And if so, why did they not go to sea?

Clearly any trout of steelhead origin planted in Neuquen province would not have easy access to the sea. Yet rainbows introduced in the Chilean Lakes region would have easy access to the sea.



FWIW.....

One plane drop of pink salmon in Lake Superior and pink salmon colonized many if not most of Lake Superior tributaries. Those pinks were originally destined for James Bay in order to provide dog food for the Cree. The irony of this what.... misguided attempt to introduce pink salmon is if global warming continues, pink salmon may ultimately invade James Bay

From what I understand, a number of Ontario steelhead streams were never stocked with steelhead, in particular those flowing into Georgian Bay.

Must admit that I am a little puzzled as to why steelhead have not established runs through out the Maritime provinces and eastern Quebec given the good number of stocked rainbow ponds here and there and everywhere along with historic stocking of trout streams with rainbow trout.
 

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I found at least one of the documents I read about salmonid invasions. This is a lengthy, technical analysis but very interesting. There are other documents out there but I only seem to have bookmarked this one. Too bad lake trout are so easily established. The Yellowstone system is going to hell because some knucklehead thought Lake Trout would be better a better gamefish than the native Yellowstone cutthroat.
 

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They caught 2 pink salmon in Ungava bay this year.... Or so I heard. I had read of catches in NFLD and Labrador, but never that far North. Crazy...
 

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Poor Steelies, I wonder if they are treated like the Gobies in the Great Lakes....
To add to it in 1955 they tried Chum Salmon in the Winisk River, along with Pinks. Sadly, nobody came back. (Fishes Of Ontario)
 

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Claude: rainbow or steelhead? That looks like an ocean-fed rainbow. Got make more than a few people nervous.....
 

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It looks like a steelhead to me. No black spots below the lateral line (or that I can see at least). I had heard about the Rainbows in the Gaspé rivers., but have never read anything about their distribution or abundance. I hope it is low....
I love Steelhead... But in their native distribution...
 
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