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I ran across this video on another forum. It is one of the better ones I've seen on the net. For a variety of reasons.

First off, the vantage point of the casting is great. Secondly, you can see what the fly is doing and more importantly, see the fish going after the fly before finally hammering it at the end (two are caught, the last one was the most exciting hearing the reel sounding off).

It is on the North Umpqua river.

tp://theflyshop.com/Mikes_Folder/kindofabigdeal.mov



I wish there were more videos like this. Nice casting in actual fishing situations. Not just casting for casting sake. Maybe Ed's video will ring close to this.
 

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Okay... I've watched this at least 4 times. Talk about stoking the steelheading obsession fires! I've fished the North Umpqua only once, in my pre-two-hander days. We picked the hottest part of the summer, so spent more time in the lower main stem going after smallies.

I was interested to see the huge amount of action he put on that fly--is that typical with skaters/wakers, or more specific to that particular strain of steelhead?

Can anyone tell (probably by the color) what head he was using? I would guess Vision Ace....

Can't wait until the summer!

Tom
 

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Thank you RMflyrods for posting this link. We are socked in by freezing cold winter around here in Pittsburgh and the video really brightened my day. The casting is great and makes me envious but the real treat to my mind, is the fish action-just awesome! :) :) :) :) :)
 

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gives a whole new concept to skating flies!!! He is not just keeping the fly under tension using a riffle hitch - he is really stripping it fast across the water and back up towards him and the fish are going crazy!!!
 

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video link

For some reason, I can't get the link to open up. The address that I see is:

tp://theflyshop.com/Mikes_Folder/kindofabigdeal.mov

I also tried to add a "ht" in front of the address and it didn't go. Could someone please post the link address again.

Thank you. Happy New Year too!!
 

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Rick J,

If you watch carefully you will notice that he is not "stripping" the fly in. He is flipping his rod tip in a way that sends a "pop" down the line to the fly. Scott Howell{ well known guide} has been doing that technique with his "scouper " fly on that river for some time.

Beau
 

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Tight line takes
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To set the record straight,both the technique seen in the video and fly style for which Scott Howell seems to get so much credit for is not new.It has been used on that river as well as many others long,long,LONG before he started guiding there.


Mark
 

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From Speypages Administration:

The reason that the link has been edited is because this shop is not a sponsor. These conditions are clearly listed in the agreement as you sign up
 

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That is true Mark. I just could not remember the name of one of the other persons[this one was an old timer] that was well known for something similar[more of a "palsy",trembling arm style]. Bob Clay sometimes uses a variation of the style.

Beau
 

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I do see that he is creating the disturbance by rod tip action but at least on some of the clips it appears the fly is actually being stripped back upstream - perhaps it is just the angle as you can't really see the fly fisherman or rod in some cases. I have used similar techniques but not with quite the action being done here. Certainly seems to get the fishes attention!!!!
 

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A short history lesson:

The original pattern that started the craze was developed on the North Umpqua. Many others may claim it but it is not true.The particular pattern of fly and techniques to fish it have been in use since the late 80's.The fly pattern was unique at the time and now there are a hundred variations in every fly shop from BC to Boston. The originator did not want credit or care about credit for the pattern. He fished it, found out it worked well and left it at that.

In addition:
Many years ago(early 90's) on the Kispiox etc, the originator was using the "twitch" as we call it and the BC guides freaked out! Obviously something they had not seen before let alone tried."What are you doing"? "Don't do that"!! "Don't move the fly like that it won't work"! They were getting pissed off but he continued with the twitch anyway. Low and behold they started to see the light as he began to raise and hook fish. They shut up real fast. Bob Clay and other top BC guides were witness to some of that early twitching. The rest is history. The fly and technique have entered the steelheading world for good.


I think that movement on the fly has been used since time began.Guys have been doing it with wets,drys and sunk flies forever. But a rhythmic,pulsing action together with this unique(at the time)pattern that moved water like this was a new groundbreaking technique at the time it was developed locally.

He has fished the NU a long time but he is not an old timer Beau.

Mark
 

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Discussion Starter #18
A short history lesson:

The original pattern that started the craze was developed on the North Umpqua. Many others may claim it but it is not true.The particular pattern of fly and techniques to fish it have been in use since the late 80's.The fly pattern was unique at the time and now there are a hundred variations in every fly shop from BC to Boston.
Thanks for the background. Do you know where we can find a picture of this pattern? Or a name so that I can look up? I'm curious what it may look like.

Thanks,
Rick
 

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They are everywhere

Look in any fly shops at the spun deer hair and foam skaters. That will give you an idea what it looks like.Dozens of varieties everywhere you look now. Many commercial companies have tried to copy this fly. Some are close but none exact. The original is still the best I think.

Mark
 

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Yes,I guess 20-30 yrs ago doesn't qualify as old timer on that river. I guess I thought he was pretty old for some reason when the guys on the Skeena system witnessed it. Thks for the history.

Just as a side note I have had a couple interesting experiences that made me think of strong popping about 9/10 yrs ago. One was on the Kispiox,fishing flood conditions,standing in deep water to get clear of the trees and brush. I was fishing a big hot pink intruder and the hook caught the line above the front of the fly and the fly landed backwards.I put the rod under armpit and did a fast two hand fast retrieve with the fly skipping across the water surface[backwards]. You probably guessed by now that a nice Steelhead made a grab at it a couple of feet from my hands!

Nearly the same thing happened on the Rio Grande. It was even more stunning. At the time , the local guides were small fly porponents.I made a cast across the river...a little to far and into some soft water with big moss cover rocks. I hooked some of that moss.Again ,I put rod under armpit and pulled the line with my hand to free it .Once freed but still hooked to a hunk of moss about 8" long and about 2-3 " wide,I again retrieved it rapidly across the surface so as to get the moss off,check the hook, and get the fly back to searching. You guessed it..about an 8 lb Brown struck it and I hand set the hook and put him on the reel.Small flies,carefully fished, eh???

Beau
 
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