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Discussion Starter #1
i've only found little tidbits and casting instructions and such on the internet, but can someone direct me to some place that has a good amount of info about the spey cast, where it comes from, what it's used for, etc.

honestly, i have no interest in taking up speying (sorry, don't know what else to call it), but it's had me curious for a while. plus it's interesting to watch a snake roll.

oh, and can a spey cast be used in regular fly fishing? i guess 'yes' for a roll cast.

thanks.
 

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a/k/a loophitech
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457 Posts
welcome aboard

well you certainly found the right web site to make your inquiry.

you will probably get some wonderful replies on this subject. i for one spey cast predominantly now and very rarely, other than trout, do not pick up a single handed rod.

spey casting and its varied forms and casting styles can enhance any fishing situation from salt chuck beaches and estuaries to small crick to huge rivers.

i have been two handing the salt for well over two years now and find it more pleasurable to cast these rods in the salt all day. this past year i have been using a CND Atlantis 11' 11 weight and am getting far better at hitting distances over 120' where I need to be when the tide is high where i fish.
so, spey rods are pretty much limited to nothing other than your fear of public humiliation about using such a tool where it was previously taboo...

spey casts can and have been used in regular fly fishing.

for a more thorough breakdown, check out Simon Gawesworths book on spey casting and you will see a very clear picture of the way of the spey...

good luck in your quest for knowledge grasshopper....


vinnie
 

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Coast2coast Flyfishaholic
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Spey is a casting and fishing style that originated in it's namesake region along the River Spey in Scotland centuries ago to solve angling problems in the pursuit of atlantic salmon and sea-run trout of the region: (a) limited backcasting room (b) improved line control and (c) maximized coverage of water by reducing unnecessary motion, providing full length casting with change of direction with as little as a single motion.

It differs from common overhead casting in that the backcast is left folded under the rod tip such that the end of the flyline lightly grips the water for an instant as the forward cast begins, much like a "dynamic roll cast".

Unlike said roll cast, the line is kept in a fluid and continuous movement to prevent dead line and excess surface tension, in fact the only real contact for the main part of the cast is a short portion of the end of the line (the grip or anchor) while the rest of the line is in the air in the shape of the letter "D", known as the D-loop.

There are numerous variations of the Spey cast, which can be said to be comprised of two basic parts - the setup, and the cast itself. The purpose of the setup is to get the D-loop formed properly in the conditions you face - current and wind direction, etc. The cast itself (after setting up) is almost identical despite the variations.

Aside from the mechanical aspects - the personal pleasure and sense of accomplishment from the practice and study of this casting art is found to be intense by many, not the least of which are the members of this BB. The beauty of this form of casting is hard to ignore when seen in the backdrop of a river bank, whether seen through your eyes or anothers.

It's downright addictive.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
yeah, i've seen a few videos of spey casts on the internet and was fascinated by the large movements, directional changes, big round loops, and suspended lines and such. i might pick up a video just to watch.
 
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