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I just got a sage spey rod/reel case. It doesnt seem like they offer the benefit that single handed rod/reel cases offer. You have to take all the pieces off, and you cant keep it lined.
 

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loco alto!
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for me, taping the sections of a lined rod is a hassle. It takes more time to avoid taping the line to the rod than simply taping first and stringing second.

If you really want to keep the rod lined in the case, simply don't put each rod section it its own little compartment.

I see no real advantage with spey rod cases, unless you are a non-taper
 

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I'm a big fan of the cases made by Harding & Sons, I have 4 of them and will probably pick up a couple more. They do not have the individual dividers but I have never had a problem with any wear on my rods from it. I never store my rods lined but I guess you could if you were of a mind to. The advantages to me are you don't have to worry about the tube bouncing and banging around in your car, they are easy to carry and most of all, the reel stays on the rod.
 

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I think they offer the exact same advantage, which sinktip mentions, that single-hand versions provide: they allow you to keep rod and reel together. Those of us who've gone on long trips and managed, somehow, to forget a reel may appreciate this comfort more than others. Personally, I have rod/reel cases for all my rods for exaclty this reason. Don't see the "need" for keeping a rod strung--regardless of the taping issue--during travel or transport, either. Pretty sure that's an additional 30 seconds of set-up time I can spare. :chuckle:
 

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loco alto!
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so do you guys just unzip the case to allow wet reels to dry out? I am forced to dry mine on high shelves, out of reach of my 16 month old daughter. Then I can pick it up ... reel in a few turns ... and dream ...
 

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Steve,

Yes, I have a closet dedicated to all things Spey. That and half of a gun safe I should say. I simply stick it in teh closet (witht eh door propped open), unzip the case, hang the reel pouch off the top and let it sit for a day or so till everything is dry. The maker I mentioned also has an option for a zippered end cap which allows air-through drying.

Fshbm,

I didn't mention the "forgot the reel" reason but there is that too. NOt that I would ever admit to doing it :cool: I have nearly dropped a reel putting it on in the dark though and for that reason alone, I like not having too worry.
 

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I have been looking at those cases by Harding. Question for those that have them. Do you have the dual model or the single model? I have been looking at the Dual spey model since I have 4 spey rods and was looking at keeping all the gear together in one place. Also they have a pocket as an option - anyone use that for storage.

Also, for the reel is there any padding around it?

Thanks - Hansen
 

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Harding Cases

I have two Harding cases, both with dividers for each section. They were special order, but they were on my porch about two weeks after ordering.
 

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Ragatz,

I only have the single models although I can see an use for one of the doubles. You would just have to make sure that both rods were the same length and number of sections.

I have never paid to get the pocket option as I keep everything (inclusing the kitchen sink) in my vest.

The reel area is padded with I believe 1/2" closed cell foam covered on the inside with a soft fleecelike fabric and on the outside with codura.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
spey rod and reel cases

fshbm said:
I think they offer the exact same advantage, which sinktip mentions, that single-hand versions provide: they allow you to keep rod and reel together. Those of us who've gone on long trips and managed, somehow, to forget a reel may appreciate this comfort more than others. Personally, I have rod/reel cases for all my rods for exaclty this reason. Don't see the "need" for keeping a rod strung--regardless of the taping issue--during travel or transport, either. Pretty sure that's an additional 30 seconds of set-up time I can spare. :chuckle:

But for me the advantage of a single handed rod case is that I can right the rod, including flies, on a 4 piece break it in half, then when I get to the river I dont have to tie the 3 fly setup on or thread the line. If they had a 6.3 foot rod and reel and reel case for my tfo 12.6 that would be a advantage. If I have to break all the pieces down and (instead of in half, lined and with flies) delined, their seems to be very little advantage to buying a 75 dollar rod and reel case versus just using the cordury rod case and the reel case the reel comes with, it takes 10 seconds to put the reel on, it takes 5 minutes to put the line through all the loops, and tie on the flies.
 

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their seems to be very little advantage to buying a 75 dollar rod and reel case versus just using the cordury rod case and the reel case the reel comes with, it takes 10 seconds to put the reel on, it takes 5 minutes to put the line through all the loops, and tie on the flies.
Not having the reel and rod together has resulted in my traveling several hundred miles to end up without a reel before. That's more than worth $75.00. Also, as sinktip mentions, there is the risk of damaging a reel taking it on and off the seat--or even "misplacing it" in the field--that does not exist if the reel remains on the seat at all times ($75.00 to protect a $700.00 reel is pretty cheap insurance). I have, unfortunately, done some pretty serious cosmetic harm to a reel or two by dropping them when setting them into the seat on the rod. And, at least with some of my reels, the act of constantly taking them on and off the seat was a source for wear on the foot of the reel itself (my Tibors in particular wore the anodization off completely). Those, frankly, are the only reasons for me having a rod/reel case. They won't help set-up time in any significant way, but so what? That's not the point. Not everyone sees their value, and, of course, they're free not to buy them.

If I have a really wet rod and reel when I get home, I'll take the whole thing out of the case (have an old glass front gun cabinet that holds only fly rods these days) and set the sections out of the way to dry. I may let all the sections along with the reel sit in there for several days before putting them away. If the rod and reel is relatively dry, I'll just unzip the top like sinktip suggests. Never had a problem with them. Been using them on single-handed rods for about the last ten years.
 

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When I lived back in the States I had a case that allowed the rod to be broken in to two pieces instead of four. Then I only had to tape one ferrule and not three. It can also stay lined up.
A bit more pricey($105) than a Harding but worth it. They are sold by Waters West Fly Fishing Outfitters in Port Angeles, WA. Do a search they have a website. It's very missed but was too long to ship over here. But it found a good home with a friend.
 

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Harding dual case

Ragatz, i have the Harding dual case, i bought the 14' one and keep a 14' and a 13' in it. there is plenty of paddiing built in to it and it protects the rods and reels really well. I have had mine over 5 years and i just throw it in the back of the truck and it is lasting really well,tight lines,brian
 

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I have a Harding double for my rods and a Sage single when I take just one rod to the river.

With the Harding double, I leave the 3 front sections in the rod sack and stick them and the sack in the tube. Then, I stick the butt section with the reel on top of the the sack and 3 other pieces. This provides protection for the rods. I go over a lot of rough roads and often a lot of 4 wheeling. I don't want graphite rods rattling around in the tube sections have one of the line guides put a ding or chip into the rod.

If I take just one rod the Sage works well, and it has dividers to keep the sections separate. There is room for your extra tip. To avoid scaring people in suburban areas, I put a large red ribbon on the handle. Otherwise people often think that it is a gun case.

If I travel from one spot to another spot, I have the magnetic towers to put the whole rods on the hood and roof of my suv. That way I don't have to break down the rods. Also, this is a great and safe way to hold up to 3 extra rods if you are using more than one rod that day.

When I get home, I remove the reels and wash them and the lines and put them in a spare sink to dry out. The rods are wiped off a 100% cotton t shirt (polyster will scratch graphite and your glasses if used as a wiper). The next day or later when everything is dry, the rod sections and reel with its section go back into the case. I still might leave the case a little unzipped to make sure the cork and the inside of the case are dry.
 

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Great.. I'll look at ordering up 2 dual cases, 1 for the 15 footers and another for the 12/14 foot 3 piece.

Thanks. Hansen
 

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Bob,
I've flown with my rod/reel in my Harding case as checked baggage several times. No problemo. I use rubber bands to secure all the sections together so they don't rattle into each other. I see no reasons for aluminum tubes other than to send a broken rod back to the manufacturer.

The Harding Bros and Sage cases are both excellent. I've got a single (15' 4 pc) and a double Harding spey case (15' 4 pc) plus a single sage spey case (14' 4 pc). My Harding single doesn't have sleeves for the individual sections while the Sage and Harding double both do. I like 'em better without sleeves though the cases with them allow the sleeves to be folded flat so a road can be easily laid on top of the sleeves. I also regularly place my rods in the cases with their lines strung.

I also have a DB Dunn spey rod case. It works, but is vastly inferior to either the Sage or the Harding Bros. models.

Lambchop - those long cases from the shop in PA made for keeping four-piece rods broken down in half are Harding Bros cases.
 
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