Spey Pages banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Spey loop different compared to single hand loop?

Hello, fellow newbie here. Was out at the Cow today with my new CND Steelhead hoping to hook into some Steel but unfotunately did not, but did hook into some FAT 5lb SRCs that felt like Steel.
Anyways, just got done reviewing some videos on the net and dvd and noticed that the Spey loop is somewhat dif compared to a single hand loop, the upper loop of a spey cast is slightly off to the right(being right handed) to the bottom of the same loop, unlike in single hand flyfishing, the loop is directly parallel (over/under) of each other. Here am I trying to get my spey loops directly parallel of each other and maybe this is the cause of me loosing 5+ flies, (line snapping/whipping the water on back cast).
Correct me if I'm wrong, but could this be true?

PS: I did 20 or so perfect casts in a row then all of a sudden they started to become lazy loops and lack of power, could it be cause of fatigue or ?

The reverse snap T seems to be my fav right now, all the other basic casts I'm still trying to perfect. Thanks for the help guys!

Peter ><>
 

·
loco alto!
Joined
·
3,109 Posts
all manners of over/under or side-by-side loops are possible with one or two handed rods, it all depends on the rod angle during delivery.

Just remember that while a side-by-side loop looks really sexy from the side (artificially tight), it can lead to wonky leader turnover.
 

·
Coast2coast Flyfishaholic
Joined
·
1,771 Posts
I can only speak for myself in this matter, and I am sure there are those who are expert casters using a vertical loop. In most casting situations, single-handed overhead, double-handed overhead, or spey - I personally prefer to cast with the top half of the loop further away from the caster than the bottom half of the loop, even if by a small gap.

Cases where I would put my loop vertically over the bottom half include accuracy casting with a single hander, rare in practice while fishing as I have become accustomed to accurate placement with an offset loop from years of sight fishing on the flats.

In Spey casting instruction I teach that the forward cast occurs in a plane that is closer to the caster than the anchor, approximately half the distance for purposes of communication. That is to say where the anchor lays down about a rod length away and in front of the caster, the path of the upper half of the d-loop is pulled around to be straight and pointing to the target in a plane that is about half as far away as the anchor. This is the straight line path (SLP) where the initial acceleration should occur.

When tension is applied by bending the rod and moving the tip forward the belly flies forward, pulling the line into a pulley effect. Thus the anchor is pulled upward from the water and naturally progresses into a plane that is slightly futher out than the bottom half of the loop which is in line with the stop of the rod tip. Unlike the side-by-side loop, the upper half of the loop is distinctly higher than the lower half throughout the whole cast, but just off to the outside and above it.

Can they be made in the same plane? Of course. In fact casting over an anchor that is close to your side has some returns in terms of power, like a double spey. However it is not a good practice for switch casting and even worse for change-of-direction single spey casting. It's very difficult to pick up a long belly line and place it at a light anchor right next to you, where it is much easier to place it a rod length away.

Simple trig says an anchor point 45 degrees out from the rod tip can fit 1.4 times more line in the same vertical height. Compound that with deep wading, longer lines and the popularity of shorter rods and laying the anchor in-tight gets even less effective.

Placing the anchor tight also promotes excessive stick, trunking in an effort to 'tuck' more line, and other undesirables.

I'd be interested to hear more opinions on this, I am sure there are expert casters out there who can speak about the virtues of vertical loops.
 

·
a/k/a loophitech
Joined
·
457 Posts
I have learned that vertical loops usually end up with the hook embedded in my neck, hat clothes and other regions. :chuckle: :chuckle: :chuckle:

Juro wrote:
When tension is applied by bending the rod and moving the tip forward the belly flies forward, pulling the line into a pulley effect. Thus the anchor is pulled upward from the water and naturally progresses into a plane that is slightly futher out than the bottom half of the loop which is in line with the stop of the rod tip. Unlike the side-by-side loop, the upper half of the loop is distinctly higher than the lower half throughout the whole cast, but just off to the outside and above it.
What he said!

As for losing flies, maybe too much power on your casts which lead to anchors set way behind you and maybe bad knots? That has happened to me too many time. Dang knots!

Vinnie
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top