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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For my one handers i usually over wt my rod by one line wt.
should I also over weight my spey rod as well? Or just by the line wt of the rod? I ask this question because the rio line i am looking at
is rated in three wts.. for example 7/8/9

I have a loomis 12'6" Alta 8/9
 

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chrome-magnon man
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well...it depends

the only way to know for sure is to cast the line on your rod. some casting instructors recommend overlining your spey rod if you are a new caster. I'm not always in favor of this approach--I have seen it work for some and not for others. Although I have not cast the Alta I'm guessing it is a fairly fast rod. The heavier line will slow it down some and allow you to feel the rod loading a little better than the lighter line. If I was going to line this rod without casting the various combinations I would use the first number on the line rating as my reference, and match that to the first number of the line I was selecting. That would mean a Windcutter 8/9/10 for me.
 

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Hi

Don,t mean to hijack your thread but...:) I find the line recommendations for new vs experienced a bit mis- leading and in some cases counter-productive. For myself ( using spey for two years- so take that as you will) I wonder if the suggestion that it is often forwarded that short belly for newbies and long for the experienced or heavier for newbies /lighter for the experienced is,nt the source of more problems than solutions:). For myself when moving to spey- it was based on seeing spey as a solution to certain inadequacies I was experiencing with SH setups. So the logical view to take was to look at the various spey options and see if they solved those probs. For me a long belly fast intermediate solved many issues I had been looking to solve . My rod loaded at it's best within a certain weight range- so accepting that I had a learning curve to negotiate- why would I invest in a line that would be easier to cast initially and annoying later on as I progressed up the curve -why not just leap in and accept that the learning curve was a given and that at first it might take some time to get "up to speed". Same with short is easier long is harder- I don,t buy it:) I can cast my XLT or Airflo full ( with copious practise) with the same amount of effort as it takes to cast my home made Skagit. I have a friend here who ( maybe wiser or not than I) followed the recommendation of go with a short/mid belly at first- long belly is for the experienced- and is frustrated that his short/mid belly does,nt get it done in the circumstances. If you need a certain setup to get done what you are trying to accomplish no amount of wishing will change that:) the cost may be a long learning curve the benifit may be less frustration and less money spent:)

Will
 

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chrome-magnon man
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Will,

exactly, which is why I always recommend "try before you buy."

I am often asked "Which line should I buy?" My response is always "Which tradition do you want to learn to cast in?" and "Which line manufacturer do you prefer?" There are so many different lines that will work on any given rod, and it doesn't make sense to recommend a particular line without at first determining the needs/interests of the caster.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yes, the Alta is a faster action rod..i tried the 7/8/9 and i found the line to be too light for the rod. I replaced the line with 8/9/10 and try it out in the next few days but i have a feeling it will be the right line wt for the rod.

thanks for the info.
 
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