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chrome-magnon man
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Speycasting History from a Canadian Perspective

My friend Art Lingren, noted Canadian angling author (Google "Art Lingren" for the latest) and long-time member of the BCFFF and Totem Flyfishers, has written a history of Speycasting from a Canadian perspective and has kindly offered to allow us to publish it for the web here at Speypages.com. It is a well-researched piece that certainly opened my eyes about some aspects of Spey history here in Western Canada.

Enjoy!

Lingren on Speycasting
 

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JD
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Nice, very nice.

Thank you Dana for posting that.
 

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Much credit to Art Lingren for this major contribution to our understanding of spey's North American history. Art's books about British Columbia flies and waters are already landmarks in the angling literature of the Pacific Northwest.

A very minor kvetch: Toward the end, Art made reference to the "S. A. Midspey." This is the sort of momentary linguistic sneeze that we all make from time to time. But I'd like to know: was he referring to the Rio Midspey line, or the Midspey-length S. A. Mastery line?
 

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Thanks Dana,
A really good read, there is a couple of things not quite right, one being that Alexander Grant was never a schoolmaster, the other is a mistake in Fine and Far off , but a very good read all the same.
 

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Dana,

A very good read. The only thing to point out is Art's interpretation of McMillan's method is nowhere near the truth of the matter. Dead drifting was but one technique that ended up being a last resort under most conditions. Bill even says later on that he never really developed a liking to the method and gave it up.

William
 

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Wow!

I sometimes avoid reading lengthy posts, much less attached documents. But I opened this and couldn't close it until I had at least looked at every page. I want to take the time to read it all thoroughly.

One of the things that struck me was the apparent description of continuous motion in so many of the earlier writings and pictures. This is likely due to the rods available at the time, but it is a concept I am trying to better understand. From discussions with Al Buhr, and observations of Olga casting subsequent to some of Al's instructions, it seems that there are some fishing advantages to be had with continual motion, as it can further minimize the D-loop space required

Like I said, I'll have to take time to read this in detail. Thanks!

--Bill

P.S. Another thing that struck me was the mispelling of your last name!:D
 
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