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I have been using a turle knot to attack my leader to the fly for as long as I have been fishing for Atlantics and Steelhead. I'm curious if others use different knots to attach their flies, and why?
 

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I have been using the turle knot for Atlantics since I started fishing them in the sixties on turned up and down eyed hooks. An exception is when using straight eyed hooks I use a fixed loop knot such as the Kreh loop.Have never had a reason to change.
 

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Improved clinch for intruder types, saltwater loop for spey types.
 

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I also favor the turle knot, but use a no-slip loop knot on longer flies like intruders. I see no issue with using the improved clinch on articulated flies (moals) as it is the back part that wiggles. I watched a Rio demo that showed that the turle is much stronger than the clinch. My reason for using the turle is that the pull is in-line with the shank of the hook. My main complaint about turles is that if you cut the tag too short it can be a pain to dig the knot out of the eye.
 

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I use to use the turle knot for upturned eyes and improved clinch for down turned eyes .... now it's one knot for everything ... and I mean everything.
The Double Surgeon's Loop does it all for me. Starting with the backend loop from backing to running line. Then Double Surgeon's Loop to attach leader to line and tippet to leader. I use a 1.5" loop for #8's to #4's and a 3" loop for everything bigger.
When I started using "gut eye"(Dacron) flies, I liked the idea of a loop to loop connection. It also makes for switching flies really easy in the middle of a run. It really helps when your uncertain of a fly (just not "feeling" it) and you're standing in the middle of the rotation on a famous salmon pool. I can swap out a fly in less than 20 seconds and look like I never missed a swing :hihi:
Plus the Double Surgeon's Loop has 100% knot strength.

..... and for the record, I don't believe for one second the fish shy away from the long line loop.


Mike
 

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I use to use the turle knot for upturned eyes and improved clinch for down turned eyes .... now it's one knot for everything ... and I mean everything.
The Double Surgeon's Loop does it all for me. Starting with the backend loop from backing to running line. Then Double Surgeon's Loop to attach leader to line and tippet to leader. I use a 1.5" loop for #8's to #4's and a 3" loop for everything bigger.
When I started using "gut eye"(Dacron) flies, I liked the idea of a loop to loop connection. It also makes for switching flies really easy in the middle of a run. It really helps when your uncertain of a fly (just not "feeling" it) and you're standing in the middle of the rotation on a famous salmon pool. I can swap out a fly in less than 20 seconds and look like I never missed a swing :hihi:
Plus the Double Surgeon's Loop has 100% knot strength.

..... and for the record, I don't believe for one second the fish shy away from the long line loop.


Mike
Maybe you can shed some light on a discussion my buddy and I were having the other day...

I always thought that when tying the Surgeon's Loop knot, you make a bight, then made an overhand knot consisting of two passes through. In other words, by default a regular Surgeon's Loop knot meant two passes through before tightening.

I always thought a 'double' or even 'triple' Surgeon's loop meant that the overhand knot required more than two passes through, which seems like a pretty bulky knot to be sliding through guides. My friend argued that a 'double' Surgeon's Loop meant simply two passes through to make that figure 8 overhand that was tightened down. So is a normal Surgeon's Loop just one pass through?

What's your thought on this?
 

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Mike,

I actually thought I was the only guy around that used the double surgeons loop knot to tie the fly to the leader. I started using it cause I can tie it in a hurry with frozen fingers and the other reason was it's 100% strong, and a person can tie it blind folded.

Carl Blackledge
 

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I've been using an improved clinch knot variation. I pass the line through the eye of the fly, wrap line around the hook shank then back out the eye of the hook. Then tie improved clinch knot. (You could also just fold line, push the loop through the eye of the hook then pass the fly through the loop just like using a double surgeon loop)
The knot tucks in neatly to the eye of the hook. Seems to work good for me using fairly light FC tippet.
 

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I've been using an improved clinch knot variation. I pass the line through the eye of the fly, wrap line around the hook shank then back out the eye of the hook. Then tie improved clinch knot. (You could also just fold line, push the loop through the eye of the hook then pass the fly through the loop just like using a double surgeon loop)
The knot tucks in neatly to the eye of the hook. Seems to work good for me using fairly light FC tippet.

That's not a loop knot
 

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Loop to loop with a perfection or double surgeon like mike describes so i dont have to cut the line for a new fly (although i will NEVER use dacron as an eye. Too many downsides about it when mono is 100 percent better).

I use the turle knot too just as much.
A rappala knot is problamatic in my opinion, since it creates a hinge point between the tippet and fly. That is fine if you want your fly to have more wobble, but not good for casting
 

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This may be elementary but, can I use a perfection loop with a half hitch on small tube flies? I know a lot of you loath perfection loops but I've had pretty great luck with them. When they break its user error. Another question, can I use a clench knot on straight hooks and back the hook into the tube?


Thanks!
 

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This may be elementary but, can I use a perfection loop with a half hitch on small tube flies? I know a lot of you loath perfection loops but I've had pretty great luck with them. When they break its user error. Another question, can I use a clench knot on straight hooks and back the hook into the tube?


Thanks!
Bump on this?
 

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I use to use the turle knot for upturned eyes and improved clinch for down turned eyes .... now it's one knot for everything ... and I mean everything.
The Double Surgeon's Loop does it all for me. Starting with the backend loop from backing to running line. Then Double Surgeon's Loop to attach leader to line and tippet to leader. I use a 1.5" loop for #8's to #4's and a 3" loop for everything bigger.
When I started using "gut eye"(Dacron) flies, I liked the idea of a loop to loop connection. It also makes for switching flies really easy in the middle of a run. It really helps when your uncertain of a fly (just not "feeling" it) and you're standing in the middle of the rotation on a famous salmon pool. I can swap out a fly in less than 20 seconds and look like I never missed a swing :hihi:
Plus the Double Surgeon's Loop has 100% knot strength.
Mike, just to be clear: are you putting the fly on the line and then making two passes with it when you're tying the Double Surgeon (and thus letting the fly swing freely in the loop), or are you tying the Double Surgeons first and then putting the loop through the fly eye for a handshake, loop-to-loop connection?
 

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Maybe you can shed some light on a discussion my buddy and I were having the other day...

I always thought that when tying the Surgeon's Loop knot, you make a bight, then made an overhand knot consisting of two passes through. In other words, by default a regular Surgeon's Loop knot meant two passes through before tightening.
I believe you are correct on this. The medical literature ... surgeons ! ... uses "surgeon's knot" to describe an overhand knot that brings the line through twice, then repeated.

The variants have inconsistent meaning

"Double surgeon" is often used as equivalent to "surgeons" (that is, two turns), but it literally can mean 2X surgeons (four turns), or it can mean the line is doubled over before tying. :Eyecrazy:

I prefer the phrase "two-turn surgeon" for two passes through, and "three-turn surgeons" for three passes through. Add the word "loop" if making a loop.
 
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Mike, just to be clear: are you putting the fly on the line and then making two passes with it when you're tying the Double Surgeon (and thus letting the fly swing freely in the loop), or are you tying the Double Surgeons first and then putting the loop through the fly eye for a handshake, loop-to-loop connection?
I tie the Double Surgeons Knot first and then thread through the eye of the hook, around the fly and then cinch it tight.
This makes for swapping out flies real easy.
So far, I haven't felt the large loop spooked any fish.


Mike
 
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