Spey Pages banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
149 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just to bring on to you all a rod I have tested extensively the last days, that I have not seen mentioned here;

A Snowbee XS - P 15 ft speyrod, designed by MUSTO finalist Bob Wellard. A rod almost unknown to Scandinavia I was kind of sceptical when it arrived. I have had to change my mind...

Being what most of you would call a fast action rod, it has that tremendous nice and stiff tip, and I think I never tested a rod which I threw tighter loops with in speycasting than this. An exellent rod especially for heavy work in high water with long specialty lines and sinkers.

Also, and very interestingly according to other discussions on the forum, the rod is suggesting suitable line head weight in grams (44 grams actually on this model). Snowbee also has a series of new speylines out for this rod series, and it lokks intriguing.

Any of you on the board from the British Isles who have access to this rod agree or disagree?

Best regards from Norway
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
465 Posts
This sounds interesting indeed. I like how they've rated the rod for the weight of the head it best throws. An absolute and quantifiable value (44 grams or 680 grains in this case). This seems a good way to rate a rod given the mess in how the lines are currently indexed.

pescaphile
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
215 Posts
Don't know about this rod, but I have one of their older single handers which I still like, and have cast a couple of others. I shall try to give this new rod a 'test drive' at the Game Fair this July; I'm fairly sure Snowbee generally exhibit there.

Snowbee lines for single handers receive consistently high praise over here, and the new speycasting ones were favourably reviewed in Fly Fishing and Fly Tying magazine last month. They are available in three head lengths - 51', 62' and 73'.

One slightly surprising thing, though, is that the weights of the heads are the same for each nominal rating, regardless of length; thus all the 10/11 lines, (which theoretically match Norwegian's rod), have 44g heads. This seems to fly in the face of the notion of 'casting weight'.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
103 Posts
I'm wondering how long it will be before line weight designations move from 1-wt., 2-wt., 3-wt., etc. to grains. If rod and line manufacturers could put that in effect, life would be so much nicer. All it would take is for the rod manufacturers to list rods as being able to handle a range of grains from "x" to "y". Perhaps soon...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
215 Posts
Sorry Peter, I was unclear. I just used the term 'casting weight' as shorthand, to refer to the loading generated by a particular line when cast, in contrast to its 'dead weight' as determined by a set of scales. Your Casting Weight Model has elegantly illustrated that it's not simply the dead weight of the line that dictates the loading on a rod in a spey cast. I also take your point that technique affects the loading (or casting weight).

Snowbee, by contrast, seem to imply that, having heads of equal dead weight, their lines will all load the rod to which they are (theoretically) matched equally well. This, of course, ignores the fact that heads of the same dead weight but different lengths will produce different loadings.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
149 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for comments. And I agree fully with the consideration of Peter S-c and Gardener re. weight and that being dependent on head lenght. Still I think (as you all say) Snowbee deserves credit for their braveness. I can add that the rod shows large flexibility in line weights and types, and encourage those of you with access to it to try it out.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top