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Hi Guys, Has anyone cast the new lines from Snowbee? Also what kind of reputation do they have as I have not herd of them in the USA until now.
Thanks,
Leroy.......................
 

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I have casted a 3D (the longest type) of their new speylines,in the 44 grams weight (supposted to be equal to a aftm 10/11 class, with a head of some 70 feet ( 24 meters).

Being a person mostly casting underhand - scandinavian style with shooting heads around 13 meters, but who also has some experience with the fine SA XLT spey and the RIO windcutter (not a long line in your terms, but though...), I must say I am really impressed by the Snowbee line. It was very easy to get accustomed to, and performed very well when I tested it on still water. It was also for me very easy to shoot quite some distance. Even on long casts the line rolled out very nicely.

The head part is white while the shooting line behind is light green, so it easy to know where your line are.

I cant say anything about its durability, but my experiences with its performance is very good and I would recommend you give it a try if you can!

As said on another post the line comesw ith heads in different lenghts, and maybe the weights could have been slightly reduced on the shorter versions (1D and 2D) to have them even better adapted to one rod class. To me it would also be nice to have known the full lenght of the line - as on the RIOs and SAs (I dont know have far it goes!!!)

Good luck.
 

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I'd reiterate what I said on the other thread. Snowbee - and in particular their lines - enjoy a very good reputation here, and are often recommended over more expensive and better known makes. It's not a glamorous brand, but has a reputation for producing good tackle at a fair price. I believe the lines are British made, from the same factory as the Shakespeare Worcestershire lines (which also regularly receive praise and are modestly priced).
 

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Snowbee 3-D Spey lines

Hi Guys,

Glad to read the interest in the new Snowbee 3-D lines.
With regards to the line total length, I can confirm the 1-D (51ft Head) & 2-D (62ft Head) are 35yds/110ft & the 3-D (73ft Head) lines are 40yds/ 120ft.

You might also like to know, the 1-D, 2-D & 3-D lines, come in 3 different head weights ranging from 36-56g to match the 'OHW' (Optimum Head Weights) of the Snowbee 'Spey' Rods.

I would be happy to send a selection to Dana for a review?

Best regards,

Bob
Snowbee (UK) Ltd
 

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Sponsor

Hi ,
I, used to work for that tacke shop in Marlebone which always owed you money ,not any more though .
A good bet for marketing the lines and rods would be to think about sponsoring the board here ,think its a very economic proposition and you,d be exposed to a large part of the spey casting world .
BTW the Snobee tackle is some of the better UK value for money tackle available and the lovely Linda who often answers the phone was one of thew high spots of a working day ,until I saw the light and retired from selling tackle in the UK :smokin:
 

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the 1-D, 2-D & 3-D lines, come in 3 different head weights
HI Bob,

I have just bought a 1D line 8/9.

I have a B&W 13' rod rated 9/10DT and today spent 2 hours drawing in the head progressively to find out the optimum length of head for the rod. It seems for me that I have to pull in a rod length of the head (down to the reel) to get the best from the line; if I cast with the head at the rod tip it just doesn't seem to 'work'.

Does this suggest to you that I should have a heavier line, if so would it be the 9/10 or the 10/11 ?

I am a beginner and so your advice would be very much appreciated.

Cheers.
 

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1-D 36g (#8/9)

Hi Ray,

From what you describe, I reckon you're already not far off the mark. Having pulled in 13ft of the head (the rear taper plus a few feet) you've reduced the head weight by only a few grams. If your B&W 13' is loading nicely at this point, going up aline weight will simply over-load it.
I would suggest you stick with the 1-D line (head weight of 36g) and just experiment with how much of the rear taper you pull back through the tip.
You could also experiment with the amount of line you put into your 'D' loop..... Try increasing the size of the 'D' loop by adding a little more momentum to the 'back-sweep' (ensure you still maintain the anchor point).
By adding the line speed into the 'D' loop, you should 'feel' the line weight loading nicely....let me know how you get on.

Cheers

Bob
 

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Line Weight

Hi Bob,

I appreciate your reply and will try things out a little more as per your suggestions.

Apart from 'feel', which obviously as a beginner I do not yet have, how can one tell if a line is overloading or underloading your rod ?

Cheers.
 

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Hi Ray,

Fair comment! In most cases a rod has what's often described as a 'sweet spot'. The weight of line being used matches the flexing action of the rod and the caster 'feels' the rod bending against the weight of line (the load) swept back into the 'D' loop. In an ideal situation this will be where the line is at its optimum line-shoot postion. i.e. where the end of the rear taper and running line is positioned ready to shoot through the rod tip.
A softer, through action rod, will have more 'feel' for the loading process than a very tip/ fast-action rod.

Unlike overhead casting, where the full weight of the line is transferred into a back-cast, a Spey cast transfers around only 80% of the head weight into the 'D' loop (the front taper makes contact with the water to form the anchor - 20% of the weight never gets behind the rod tip).

There's a lot more to this but in basic terms, the rod that is over-loaded is flexing agianst too much line weight and the rod that is under-loaded could do with having a Spey-line weight with more head weight.

If you get chance, take a look at Bruce Richards' Book "Modern Fly Lines" - (Lefty's Little Library of Fly Fishing) - this book contains a wealth of information on this subject and is written by the fly line 'Master'.

Play around with shape of your 'D' loop - during the 'lift and sweep' keep the line under tension, with a continuous fluid movement, and as soon as the 'D' loop forms just check how much the rod is flexing before you make the final power snap.

Hope this helps!

Bob W
 

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Rod loading

Thanks again Bob,

I'm practicing like someone obsessed at the moment, around two hours every night, perhaps I am....

I'll bear in mind what you say and see how it goes. I am feeling some improvement, but consistency is not there just yet.

Thanks again for your advice.

Cheers.
 

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Bob Wellard said:
If you get chance, take a look at Bruce Richards' Book "Modern Fly Lines" - (Lefty's Little Library of Fly Fishing) - this book contains a wealth of information on this subject and is written by the fly line 'Master'.
Where will I find this Bob? I just had a look through 'Amazon' and couldn't find it there.

Cheers
 

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Dana yours are on the way

And a couple arrived for me to test drive ,first trial will be on a famous english lake Blagdon this sunday ,hope to get near some running water the next weekend ,watch this space and of course Spey pages .:smokin:
 
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