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The Skeena in the fall
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The Skeena is currently at 11.5 C and the Bulkley is over 15 C.
That's 53 and 59 F respectively
A bit toasty for June
 

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The Fraser is at 16.4C and the "T" is at 17.3C. Toasty is an understatement. All system water temperatures are trending higher.

Snow melt will moderate temperatures in many systems. The lakes on the T system will moderate temperatures.

As for those spawning tributaries that are, by popular demand, trashed by our heroic, patriotic farmers and ranchers...., as an indicator, the Nicola is at 19C and trending higher.


My question to all you "freedom lovers" is the following: Are you really comfortable paying the lowest excise/green/carbon taxes on diesel and gasoline fuel among the rich OECD countries?
 
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I think the guys out here in the GL's would pay for those kind of temps. In many places our trout waters are way above survival temps.
 

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Dan,

The saving grace of many trout and salmon bearing streams in southern Ontario is that many are spring-fed and the riparian zones are relatively healthy.

That said, I would not be surprised to hear or read of fish kills.

It is interesting and perhaps a bit sad to contemplate that pre-contact, most smaller streams in what is now southern Ontario would have been home to teeming populations of Eastern brook charr. Many would have also hosted healthy populations of Landlocked Atlantic salmon.

To cooler temperatures. -Erik
 
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Dan,

The saving grace of many trout and salmon bearing streams in southern Ontario is that many are spring-fed and the riparian zones are relatively healthy.

That said, I would not be surprised to hear or read of fish kills.

It is interesting and perhaps a bit sad to contemplate that pre-contact, most smaller streams in what is now southern Ontario would have been home to teeming populations of Eastern brook charr. Many would have also hosted healthy populations of Landlocked Atlantic salmon.

To cooler temperatures. -Erik
You are correct. There are many spring fed refuges if they can get to them. Unfortunately, what was once teeming, as you say, with native brook char is now behind dams and channelized. Most of the dams spill from the top only letting the warmest water down stream and the continuous urban development is slowly taking over what we have left. There is currently a big fight going on in the upper Credit against a pollution control plant planned for use by the urban expansion. The big push of people moving from Toronto is fueling subdivisions everywhere within a two hour drive to the city. My area is not escaping this terror. We currently have approx 8000 or more homes being built in the next town. This will essentially more than double it's population in the next few years. The kicker is this town spans both sides of the river and the bridge is failing and currently have serious weight restrictions on it. Traffic is horrendous and adding to the population isn't helping. Even the planned replacement bridge is not going to be near enough to handle the flow. The good news is this development has driven up house prices. Way up. I think my house will be for sale in the near future. I only hope the river will survive it all but I have my doubts. Dam shame!
 

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Record temperatures in BC, and it's only June.
Record deaths too. Now likely over a 100. Asphalt roads are buckling under the heat in WA state.
 

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The Skeena is currently at 11.5 C and the Bulkley is over 15 C.
That's 53 and 59 F respectively
A bit toasty for June
I traveled the Skeena Bulkley country last week and the River levels were all very high. There is a lot of snowmelt with the high temperatures that should be cooling the rivers.. but they are still warm. Its going to be a challenging summer to be a fish !!

CRGreg
 

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I traveled the Skeena Bulkley country last week and the River levels were all very high. There is a lot of snowmelt with the high temperatures that should be cooling the rivers.. but they are still warm. Its going to be a challenging summer to be a fish !!

CRGreg
Thanks for the info, I understand the snowpack was very high this year, that's good news.
 

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The last time a heat wave hit the Bulkley it was not as bad as this latest one and it happened later in the year lby the time September rolled around there was not enough water in the river for water to flow through the fish ladders at Morricetown. Quite possible it will be the same or worse this year, early hot weather could drop the river prior to the arrival of the Morice fish in August.

Ian
 

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Record deaths too. Now likely over a 100. Asphalt roads are buckling under the heat in WA state.
sadly many of us saw this coming with the heat and other specific factors. The fires have started, i don't know much about the geography of B.C tribs but i saw on news the fires are at the thompson river meets the frasier. thoughts and prayers to the people of lytton... Might be a poorly time and/or dumb question, but Enso (you seem to have a good grasp of these type of things).

(Sorry if this a little outside the skeena river)
 

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Currently 117 fires burning , small towns are ravaged by fire, and the melting snowpack is turning rivers into flood stage.


thanks steelfisher, its truly sad..... I miss named the town, lytton is the name. The specfic fire is where the Thompson river meets the frasier.. Ive never been to the trib but i know steelhead are inches away from extinction there. Just wondered if this could harm them... Again the poor people of Lytton and other areas are in my thoughts.

BC heat wave capital Lytton evacuated due to explosive wildfire (VIDEOS) | News about lytton and thompson -nicola area
 

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sadly many of us saw this coming with the heat and other specific factors. The fires have started, i don't know much about the geography of B.C tribs but i saw on news the fires are at the thompson river meets the frasier. thoughts and prayers to the people of lytton... Might be a poorly time and/or dumb question, but Enso (you seem to have a good grasp of these type of things).

(Sorry if this a little outside the skeena river)
Two dead, many unaccounted for in Lytton. 90% of the town is said to have been destroyed. There was another fire a little south of Lytton near the Skuppen reserve but I suspect that it is largely under control.

The Thompson enters the Fraser at the north end of Lytton on the east side of the river. The Thompson River water is remarkably clear and clean at Lytton. The rocks are cleaner and far less slippery. Downstream of Spences Bridge, there are no agricultural operations of size and the river literally pounds through dozens upon dozens of class IV and class V rapids in canyon-like setting.

The lower Thompson River valley is arid and covered by rock. So it is unlikely the fire would spread far up the Thompson River.

Bright side? Daily maximum temperatures have dropped from the 47C to 49C range to the lower 30ish range. Some of the smoke has dissipated.

Concern? No significant precipitation in the forecast yet.

Coldwater salmonids in the watershed should on the whole do fine. Temperatures maxed out at just over 21C in the Nicola River and they are dropping. The Bonaparte is as cold as ever despite the lack of a healthy green riparian zone. We are lucky this heat wave occurred relatively early in the year.

Despite this dome of hot air, the mid-Pacific Ocean is ENSO-neutral. Forecasts favour La Niña conditions this autumn. Things could be worse. The world is not ending quite yet.

Thompson and Chilko river steelhead should still be living the anadromous lifestyle in 40 years from now. There may not be many but then even in good years there are not that many.
 

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Your not alone, in low hot water in your rivers.
Here in Scotland all our rivers are on their bones, and with farm run off, and now with the sewage company being private, they need profit, so it's raw sewage into the rivers. Certainly won't be putting nice fresh river Dee water in my whisky. Is this a sign of the times.?
 

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Anyone travelling to the Skeena/Bulkley this summer and or fall for steelhead... the numbers at Tyee have been some of the worst, ever.
Speaking with some fellow locals, we’re thinking about not fishing, or limiting our fish and days on the water for the sake of the fish. Please considering doing the same. Not coming one year or taking a break from your trip until numbers return to a reasonable state might not be the worst idea so we can fish in the following years.
 

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Anyone travelling to the Skeena/Bulkley this summer and or fall for steelhead... the numbers at Tyee have been some of the worst, ever.
Speaking with some fellow locals, we’re thinking about not fishing, or limiting our fish and days on the water for the sake of the fish. Please considering doing the same. Not coming one year or taking a break from your trip until numbers return to a reasonable state might not be the worst idea so we can fish in the following years.
Skipping a fishing trip to the skeena system will have little effect on the fishery, every little bit helps, but it's a much deeper issue. It'll be my 3rd year in a row that I won't be going, simply not worth it , I'll save my cash and fish locally.
 

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You’re not wrong by any means, however reduced angling pressure is about the only thing we’re able to do. Minimizing our impact by even a small scale is still better than not doing sweet FA!
 
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