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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi!

I need to cast very far because I fish on a large lake where the spool are far. I cast my single-hand rod at about 60' and I bought a spey rod to cast longer and with less stress on my arm and shoulder.

But I read a thread where some beginner said that they cast at 20-30' and some intermediate caster that said they cast at 40-50'?

Is that a normal cast length or they are not good caster?

What is the distance I can hope to cast for my first summer as a spey caster with my 13' #8 rod and my 550gr skagit head?

I am a little disapointed if it is under 60'.

Thanks.
 

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If you could describe the complete setup...

running line(if any), sinktip or leader, tippet, fly, and type of casting envisioned (overhead, sustained anchor, scandi).

There are more than enough experienced folks in this community who could give you a good idea of what your particular set-up is capable of under various circumstances.:)

For what it is worth, a 13 foot 8 weight (U.S.) should be able to reach 100 feet overhead, ten or twenty less when anchored in some fashion. If it doesn't, there's likely an equipment or operator error. :chuckle:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
running line(if any), sinktip or leader, tippet, fly, and type of casting envisioned (overhead, sustained anchor, scandi).

There are more than enough experienced folks in this community who could give you a good idea of what your particular set-up is capable of under various circumstances.:)

For what it is worth, a 13 foot 8 weight (U.S.) should be able to reach 100 feet overhead, ten or twenty less when anchored in some fashion. If it doesn't, there's likely an equipment or operator error. :chuckle:
Hi!

I will use a 100ft 0.32" Rio ConnectCore running line, a 23ft 550gr Skagit max shooting head, a 10ft medium MOW tip, about 5ft of 20lbs fluoro and mostly a size 6 rabbit strip fly pattern.

I am not sur what is sustained anchor as I will learn to spey cast with a pro in may, but I will not overhead cast.
 

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For me, my 13' 8wt rod with a skagit 540 head and 15' 170 grain tip will max out at about 100'-105', using sustained anchor cast of course.
 

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I was a bit confused on this one point...

Hi!

I need to cast very far because I fish on a large lake where the spool are far. .
...because "Skagit" tackle is most commonly considered within the context of moving water. That is why when I read that you were intending to use this set-up on a lake, I leapt to the conclusion that you would be overhead casting.

Since that is not your stated intention, some sort of water-borne anchor will be employed, which will likely degrade your achieved distance somewhat, as I mentioned earlier.

Be patient, talk with your instructor, share what you are hoping to achieve. He/she will help you get the most from your equipment, possibly even suggesting alternatives. Concern over distance, while understandable, is not the most important thing at this point--what is important, is obtaining a good foundation in proper casting technique. Distance will come on it own in time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
100' is very nice paddymc, that would be perfect for me (in fact, I need about 70' but it is hard on the body with a #9 single-hand rod).

Thanks for your help yoda1. I know that skagit is better in moving water, but I read that it still possible in stillwater (can your confirm that) and as I will fish for bass and pike, I need bigger flies, so everybody told me that skagit is better for big flies, that is why I will use skagit.

Why is skagit better in moving water, what is the difference? Do I need a lot of current?

Thanks.
 

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Skagit in moving water...

Why is skagit better in moving water, what is the difference? Do I need a lot of current?

QUOTE]

All two-handed casting techniques other than overhead require some portion of the gear to touch the water surface prior to the forward casting stroke. This contact can vary from momentary (scandi) to nearly continuous (Skagit), and from a minimal part of the gear (leader and fly in scandi) to sink-tip, leader and fly (Skagit).

To answer your question: both types of casting (scandi and Skagit) benefit not only from water surface tension, but also on the pull of water current in order to establish and/or maintain needed tension on the line during various portions of the cast. More-so with Skagit than scandi, but still helpful for success at both.

Yes, you can execute a successful Skagit cast on stationary water, you'll just have to be able to maintain sufficient tension on the line without the benefit of water current. Think of it as traction that you pull against in the effort to load the rod.

Hope that helps...
 

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Google on You Tube, George Cook Lake fishing with switch rods. His set up is a lot lighter than yours, but it will give you an idea of the casts that you can make.
Will you be able to get in the water? If you are stuck on land keep in mind that setting a D loop from shore in front of you will be a challenge.


Regards,
B13R
 

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If your casting a one hander now, why wouldnt you cast overhead with your spey rod? If your handy you could probably cast 100' today. I guess you might want a lighter head though. Just a thought.
 

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Your skill level will be one of the most important determinants of casting distance. With a one handed rod, using a double haul, many skilled casters will make 90+ foot casts routinely. With a two handed setup such as yours, skilled casters will make 100+ foot casts. The quality of instruction you get early on before you develope bad habits, the amount of time you devote to practicing and the amount of talent you have to begin with will determine how skillful you will become, and how quickly.
 

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I have recently started fishing lakes with a 4 wt switch rod (11'6) purely to practice my spey casting. The rod is sub 5 oz in weight so you can overhead either single or double handed with a regular 5 or 6wt trout line and get incredible distance if that is your objective. For spey casting the you tube video with George Cook is well worth a look. My favourite line so far is the Rio short VT in a 4wt which really shoots well. When the wind gets up or I need to cast into the wind I have used a skagit and find that going slightly heavier than you would in flowing water makes this easier. I would use a skagit short 325 in a river but find the 360 skagit switch better when casting into a wind on the lake.
I am still experimenting with lines to get the optimal presentation and a one piece line would be ideal but I have yet to find one
By thinking carefully about anchor placement, and keeping tension on the line you will really be able to spey cast a long way in still water it just takes a bit more thought. Wading definitely helps
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
This guy use long belly traditional spey line, no? I think it is easier to cast far that with a skagit head.

edit: he use a competition line, so I dont think that this is a good example...
 

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I would seriously look into using a switch rod. You can skagit cast and overhead cast with them plus the shorter length is more ideal for a stillwater setting especially with their lighter weight. I fished a switch for a couple seasons using it both in rivers and from the beaches for salmon. Overhead casting I could reach 100' or more on almost every cast 90' or under was very easy to reach. Skagit casting a switch rod pretty much maxes out around 80-90', I think this mostly happens because the thick shooting heads don't allow for a good hang time

Don't get hung up thinking a longer rod will allow further distance or that skagit style casts are the only thing to achieve the distance you seek. Weight the pros and cons between spey rods and switch rods, research, research, research

Have fun :D
 

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Why not simply use a floating 30'-35' single-hand shooting head one line size higher than the rod's rating with mono shooting line on your single-hand rod? Using a shooting head on a 10' 8 wt with mono running line can be easily cast 130' by nearly anyone who knows how to double haul without killing yourself. And you can do so with a single false cast to reposition the casting plane, then make a double-haul and let it fly.
 

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Hi!

But I read a thread where some beginner said that they cast at 20-30' and some intermediate caster that said they cast at 40-50'?
Well your Skagit head will be 25', sinktip 10-12', 3' leader. Thats 38-40' without shooting any line. So the thread you read is wrong. You should be able to do 60' on your first outing, and with a lot less effort than with your single hander.

Is that a normal cast length or they are not good caster?
With a little practice, 80-85'. 100'+ comes with time, but is not necessary most of the time. I use 10-11' switch rods, and can cast them with ease 80-85'. Most of my fishing is done @ 65-75ft. I have my 13' Speys for longer bellies. Which in your case, would be a good idea. If your stripping 40-50' of line, you might as well learn to cast a longer belly line.

Spey casting is an art, and one you must be willing to learn to enjoy. If your only objective is to gain distance, I would suggest to keep using the single-hander and buy a float tube. It will save you time, money and effort.

Just my 0.02

Avio:smokin:
 
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