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Just curious what the heaviest sink tip and length I should be getting to cast out on my 360 gr skagit compact head, or should I be going that route or looking into poly leaders on this set up
 

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Just curious what the heaviest sink tip and length I should be getting to cast out on my 360 gr skagit compact head, or should I be going that route or looking into poly leaders on this set up
That size/weight of head should be able to handle sinktips in the range 80 to 150 grains:

so you could use 10' to 19' of T8 (although 19' of T8 may be difficult to handle!), or 7' to 14' of T11, or even 6' to 11' of T14


Mike
 

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Thanks for the input Mike, I have picked up 8' of t7, going to bring it out and try it today, but next time I get out to the fly shop I know what to look for,I also noticed that the airflo tip I got only has a loop on the head side, should I tie a loop to connect to the leader or nail knot it, ect.
 

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probably best with a nail knot, although if you are happy stripping back the coating of the tip a few inches, the alternative would be to tie a loop in the core of the tip, and then loop to loop the butt of your leader to that.
 

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JD
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The real skinny on matching up sink tips is that you want the mass (wt/ft) of the tip end of the line/head to be greater than that of the sink tip, again wt/ft. The best way I know to figure that out, without cutting a foot off your line & weighing it, is the cut sheet in Al Buhr's book "How to Design Fly Lines"

I used to think a good rule of thumb for determining length of sink tip was one rod length. However, I wouldn't be overly anxious to start cutting on an expensive factory tip just because it was a couple feet longer than that. Try it out first.

A shorter tip will be more prone to pulling your anchor, while a longer tip may prove a bit more difficult to launch. Other than that, length & total weight doesn't make a whole lot of difference in sustained anchor casting.
 

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I use 8ft of T8 often with a 3" bunny fly and 360gr does this easily. I'd guess T11 wouldn't be so easy. I'm fishing a 11 ft rod.
 

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As JD suggested - wt/ft is pretty important. Assuming equal wt per line length as a rough assumption 360/22.5 = 16 grains/foot

Do not think I would be using t-14 but t-11 should handle well on that rod and line system - any length you actually would want to cast
 

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JD
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As JD suggested - wt/ft is pretty important. Assuming equal wt per line length as a rough assumption 360/22.5 = 16 grains/foot
That assumes the line is level throughout its length. And we know it is not! Since the line is tapered, and power is transmitted along it's length, it is imperative there be no increases in density along the path. Power is greatest at the beginning of the cast and gradually diminishes as the line unrolls. In order to facilitate continually unrolling of the cast, we must accommodate this diminishing energy by decreasing density accordingly. On a full floating line, we see this as a decrease in diameter. But mass density (wt/ft) is really the determining factor. Therefore, whatever the weight/foot of tip end (not counting the loop) of the floating section of line, that which is attached must be of equal, or less, weight/foot.

You can get by with practically anything on a short cast because there is ample energy, even in a wide open loop. But as distance increases, the need to optimize everything becomes more critical.
 

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JD - that is why I said as a rough assumption. The early skagits really had very little taper and this was a more valid assumption. I agree that the 16 grains per foot is likely on the high side for the compact as it does have some taper - thus my recommendation not to use T14 but I am pretty sure it will be heavier than 11 grins per foot

Best,
R
 
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