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Drags are for Sissys
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Been working on the single spey on the non-dominate side lately.
Motions that seems to be automatic on the dominate side don't always come easy on the non-dominate side - The non-dominate side is "slow to learn" and needs to be told everything.

So I've been noticing that the bottom hand on the single spey needs to somehow find itself away from the body when at the firing position of the forward cast; this of course is so the bottom hand can pull the rod down and towards the body to start the forward cast.

A few times when practicing the single on the non-dominate side this caster has found myself with the rod rising close to the firing position and the bottom hand still not pushed out and away very far from the body. Pushing the bottom hand out too much or too quickly when nearing the firing position can drop the rod tip and loose line tension; I can think of two times during the single spey cast when the bottom hand can be pushed away from body:

1) Right at the start of the lift that happens at the dangle - start the lift here by lifting with the top hand and pushing the bottom hand down. This results in the rod being swept around while being held at an angle - not horizontal level. Seems to result in a workable forward casting situation.

2) After the lift and during the motion that sweeps the rod around. Provided the rod is close to level horizontal during some of this sweeping motion the bottom hand can be pushed out without loosing line tension.

How do you do it? Are there pros and cons you can think with different methods? Was wondering when are the opportune and correct times to push that bottom hand outwards?
 

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I find that the incline lift will keep the rod tip from dropping behind which loses the tension in forming the D loop. To create the incline lift I begin the lift pushing the rod butt with the lower hand with the upper hand only guiding the direction of the incline. The bottom hand provides the power for the upsweep into the firing position while the upper hand guides the rod into this position. Once the rod arrives at the firing position the bottom hand is in the correct position for the forward cast using the lower hand again for the power. For the lift and positioning there is minimal pulling of the upper hand, only guiding the direction of the rod from the lower hand push. This can be effective in creating a V loop for a dynamic cast.
Hope this helps.
 

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paddymc,

Thanks for link the video,, using the body to assist the cast is very important.
When one focuses only on the arm motions it limits the length of rod travel (stroke) and makes timing very critical. The body rotation will smooth out the casting motion and develop much more rod loading.

Regards,
FK
 

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In this video Jan Erik Granbo shows neat "trouser belt gadget trick" which forces to use more underhand starting at 1:30

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JcSaVvTJDT4

Here is very nice and balanced modern style forward casting stroke by Alan Maugham. Note how he lifts (squeezes) rod in the end. For me it seems to make line loop narrower so I would like to hear your comments after testing. Proofs also that casting having a fixed "fulcrum point" is mostly a myth.

http://vimeo.com/32824516

Here another very nice and balanced slow motion Switch Cast by butcheo. He has few more which are worth watching.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lpM0KdJeJaQ
 

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Single-speys with my non-dominant hand up are actually more efficient. Being right handed - I am naturally weaker left-handed up so I'm using body to transfer weight from front leg during the lift, shifting to the rear leg during the sweep and back again for the forward cast. If I had to put a number on it it would be 40 upper /60 lower as far as power application to form the D-loop and to make the forward cast. Left arm up = right leg forward pointed toward the target. Right arm up = left leg forward. It is not always possible on the stream, but when and wherever possible I will cast right hand up, shoot two or three pulls of line, swap hands-up, strip line and go directly into another cast. Swapping back and forth repeatedly in that manner makes it easier to see why the cast comes off so well one way and apply the same with my other hand-up. Sometimes I find that I'm trying to teach my dominant cast to do what my non-dominant is doing.
 
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