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Discussion Starter #1
New guy here to all things Spey. I picked up an 11 foot switch rod to swing for trout but it seems big for my love cal river. (I usually fish a 9 foot 4 weight for dries & nymphs).

Can people share what single handed rods they Spey cast for trout? I have a few different rods so getting a sense of what people find work well will be helpful as a starting point.


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Basically all rod actions work for Spey and overhead casting. I think it is personal what you like to use but it seems like casters who haul very good like to use a tip action rods more. A line which has heavy rear and long front taper makes Spey casting easier and generally a less tip action rod is easier to cast.

The rod I have been most happy last two years is Orvis Clearwater 9ft #8 because it is light (3.62oz) and it was quite cheap. It has medium action (AA65) and well rated (IP153g) and good for true WF8 lines and shooting heads which weight about 260gr so Spey casting steamers is good.

My long time favorite #5 rod is Guideline Fario 9ft but Clearwater 9ft #5 was very nice when I overhead cast it and I would use for Spey casting.

Esa
 

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Most people will tell you they like a moderate fast, deep flexing SH rod for SH Spey but the power stroke is identical on a Spey cast so, as bender said, for a lot of people it will just default to what they already know. For example the rod I love doing sh Spey casts is the same one I love for overhead - not that I am anything special at either. I'd say use what you have but perhaps avoid any that are overly stiff with a soft tip that are the current rage. This is good news because some of the cheaper ones these days tend to be more mid flex - now "soulful" rod are for "beginners" apparently.

And to actually answer the specific question I really LOVE my 590 burkheimer DAL - not cheap but I cheated and saved a good bit by building one from a blank. I went through a bunch of "nice" 590s that I did not like. Too many. So when you find the one that clicks make it feel all the more significant. But anyone can (and many have) had the same experience with an inexpensive rod like a cabelas.

The same question has been asked on here many times so a search might give you a whole lot of good suggestions.
 

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A lot of my local water is too small for two handers also, so I recently picked up a 175 grain OPST commando head for my nine foot four weight. Been mostly fishing leechy stuff using one of their five foot sink tips. It’s a really fun and effective way to fish if you want to swing smaller water.
Best of luck.
 

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To properly spey casting with single hand rod, the key is the line. Regular wt fly line is too light to load the rod. Of course you can use spey casting style with any line, But what we are talking is casting efficiency and effortness.

The new scientific angler spey Lite is a great tool for single hand spey casting. You will feel the significant difference and improvement. For a 9'4wt rod, a 175g scandi or 190 skagit spey Lite is good to go.

Bearing in mind the spey lite is shooting head system. because of the light grain, the distance is limited to 50-60 feet. also, the short shooting head is not great for steady line when achieve longer distance due to short head (20' head).

Another thing is because the mass of the shooting head is compact. the regular leader is going to be light. The heavy head flies with a light speed and the leader, even 1x,0x, cannot catch up. To turn over a light small fly, a poly leader or any heavier leader is necessary.
 

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My local fly shop has a large selection of used fly rods.

When I visit, part of the time is out on the lawn with the older rods that have stiffer tips and bend initially more towards the middle of the blank. This more closely follows the nicer casting TH rods. I find fast action (flexes initially in the upper part of the blank) will struggle to lift the line and reposition it to anchor for the Spey cast.

Have found some very nice casting SH rods suitable for Spey casting in the $100 range.

New rods that work very well for me are in the lower cost imports from the Far East, they are heavier in swing weight and slower in action (deeper flex initially).

Regards,
FK
 
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