Spey Pages banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
After reading some older posts, it sounds like there’s no issue with Spey casting a typical single handed trout rod with any WF fly line, but I’m guessing it’s easier using specialty lines like Rio’s Single Handed Spey, or SA Spey Lite Integrated Scandi?

I was watching Klaus Frimor do simple single spey Scandi style cast with a single hand rod and he changed the direction of the cast using what he termed a floating anchor point. Can this also be done with a regular fly line, like a 5wt Rio Grand on a 5wt 8’6” fly rod? If so, I wonder how long the leader and tippet would need to be?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,329 Posts
After reading some older posts, it sounds like there’s no issue with Spey casting a typical single handed trout rod with any WF fly line, but I’m guessing it’s easier using specialty lines like Rio’s Single Handed Spey, or SA Spey Lite Integrated Scandi?

I was watching Klaus Frimor do simple single spey Scandi style cast with a single hand rod and he changed the direction of the cast using what he termed a floating anchor point. Can this also be done with a regular fly line, like a 5wt Rio Grand on a 5wt 8’6” fly rod? If so, I wonder how long the leader and tippet would need to be?
Just the skin tension of the water on a line or leader is enough to do spey casts. This is basically what is being done with any touch-and-go cast with just a tapered leader on a floating line. How much you need depends to a certain degree on technique and practice. The good news is you can adjust no matter how short the leader, even if you have to use a bit of actual line. So learning to adjust your anchor may be more important than the set-up initially. That said, what YOU prefer on the end of the line in a given fishing situation - a separate question - you will eventually figure out by experimenting. But I don’t think it is really an issue of “can” or a specific length. That said, do go longer if you are having trouble with blowing the anchor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,937 Posts
We call anchor a place in water where we temporarily place the line tip during a Spey cast so that line does not tangle to bushes which grow on river bank.

Esa
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,329 Posts
To expand a bit on what bender said - the anchor is what makes a spey cast a spey cast. It’s generally defined as the part of the line (and its direction) touching the water when you cast - most specifically just before you do the forward stroke. It holds things together when you throw back your loop. Too much “stick” (friction of the water against the front of the line) and it takes away the energy from your forward cast, too little and you can “blow” your anchor - in other words when you throw back your D-loop it comes unstuck and ruins your cast. There is a whole range of anchor types of course, from deeply sunk fast sinking sink tips to delicate floating line setups with nothing but a light tapered mono leader and perhaps even a floating fly. Each requires adjustment in how you cast to get things right. While it depends a lot on what you are used to, generally speaking most people find the extra stick you get from a half-sunk sink tip is more forgiving for a beginner, but whatever the style of setup there are pitfalls for too little and too much anchor. But for the SH situation described by the OP it’s all about making the cast work with the minimal stick due to the anchor being formed with a slender leader, and possibly part of the end of a slender fly line.

Really skilled casters like Frimor can have the touch to make it look almost like magic, where there is just a tiny bit of stick and exactly the right amount of line acceleration to make everything hold together and work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
840 Posts
Really skilled casters like Frimor can have the touch to make it look almost like magic, where there is just a tiny bit of stick and exactly the right amount of line acceleration to make everything hold together and work.

Klaus is something else to watch, he makes it look too easy. Ben Paull is another one that makes it look too easy. To watch him work those small rods and make it happen is something to see.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,329 Posts
This is the one I keep coming back to and want for my screen saver! Not %100 sure which line he is using but guessing a regular trout taper or something similar. He is even using double hauls at certain points on his spey casts. Really beautiful examples.

So Shorty-short skagit heads NOT required at this level. Something to aspire to!

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
After reading some older posts, it sounds like there’s no issue with Spey casting a typical single handed trout rod with any WF fly line, but I’m guessing it’s easier using specialty lines like Rio’s Single Handed Spey, or SA Spey Lite Integrated Scandi?
I really like the Bario GT90/GT125 for scandi style single hand spey. It has a long front taper and a long belly that really work will for touch and go style casting. I have been wanting to try his SLX line as well.

The other obvious choice is a Double Taper line. Normal WF or aggressive short head lines don't do well for me because there just isn't enough line out there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
297 Posts
Yep any fly line on any rod to a certain degree. Lines with most of the weight at the very front of the head will perform poorly, so only shorter casts are possible in my experience. I live in the east, so my personal favorite combo for single hand spey is a glass Cabela's Prime 7'-3" 5wt (it has a full action with a stiffer tip, and is no longer in production) paired with a Scientific Anglers Mastery DT5F. To look at the taper, you wouldn't think it would work well for spey casting, but the short front taper helps to retain energy for turnover. I also have a 9' 5wt Aetos paired to a Rio Trout LT DT5, when a little more distance is needed. I skate #18 dries and swing up to #6 traditional "mini" spey flies with both, as well as traditional upstream dry fly presentation. They handle reasonable tungsten beadhead patterns when some depth is needed. Leader length depends on the fly, but average is about 7.5' for the Prime, and 9'+ for the Aetos. They're very versatile combos and capable of spey casting remarkable distance (to me). I'm sure a more advanced caster would put me to shame with them though. The only thing the glass Prime doesn't do well for me is euro nymph anything other than the smallest of pockets. The single hand scandi style shown in those video links looks awesome! They make me want to try scandi heads for my single hand rods!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
629 Posts
I have used a mini single spey on small streams with a s/h 7' 4wt bamboo rod and DT Phoenix silk line, which works quite well.

Malcolm
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top