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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
posting here for anyone with these boots or thinking about buying these boots and after talking to their customer service. any recrafting costs fall on us. and when you see the recrafting package costs, you might second guess getting these boots. you essentially pay for a new pair tp get yours fixed. remember you pay for shipping to danner. luckily shipping back to you is covered in the costs lol
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I'd be interested to see if the box or packaging includes any kind of care instructions for the leather. I dont remember since i got them awhile ago

I really should have known though. years ago i worked at a store that sold a lot of red wings and mens boots and remember telling a customer who asked about boot care that you got to remember its skin and skin needs to be moisturized and taken care of. lol. I also learned that you shouldnt refer to leather as skin if you dont want to sound like a total creep.

Yes, I was wondering about whether either Patagonia or Danner had anything explicit about waterproofing - which is really just souped up “polishing” in the end. But I guess the downsides of abuse are just a lot more dramatic with wading boots.

My handmade hiking boots, made by the same guy, were closer to $1800! He is one of the few people in the U.S. that is both a Master Bootmaker and and expert on orthotics. I needed custom because of a surgically fused ankle joint, but at that price you really pay attention to taking care of them. He made me wading boots as well, but I think those will be his last pair. Relative to regular one-shape-fits-all shoes those hiking boots feel like a beautiful woman is massaging your feet whenever you walk around. I’m very jealous of people who are lucky enough to be able to find a good fit commercially.

But he assured me the way to take care of both was exactly the same - with stuff I mentioned above, and that they can potentially last for a lifetime if properly cared for. Note that the shoes can easily be resoled and repaired - you don’t throw stuff like that out until you can no longer repair them. I assume the Danners would last a super long time as well if you kept them waterproofed and replaced the outsoles when they wore down.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Yes, I was wondering about whether either Patagonia or Danner had anything explicit about waterproofing - which is really just souped up “polishing” in the end. But I guess the downsides of abuse are just a lot more dramatic with wading boots.

My handmade hiking boots, made by the same guy, were closer to $1800! He is one of the few people in the U.S. that is both a Master Bootmaker and and expert on orthotics. I needed custom because of a surgically fused ankle joint, but at that price you really pay attention to taking care of them. He made me wading boots as well, but I think those will be his last pair. Relative to regular one-shape-fits-all shoes those hiking boots feel like a beautiful woman is massaging your feet whenever you walk around. I’m very jealous of people who are lucky enough to be able to find a good fit commercially.

But he assured me the way to take care of both was exactly the same - with stuff I mentioned above, and that they can potentially last for a lifetime if properly cared for. Note that the shoes can easily be resoled and repaired - you don’t throw stuff like that out until you can no longer repair them. I assume the Danners would last a super long time as well if you kept them waterproofed and replaced the outsoles when they wore down.
True on being able to repair them. But $150-250 bucks to repair your boots that cost about $299 new now might be hard to justify for some. Or when other high end wading boots are out there for less

I think I just expected a little more repair/warranty coverage for the price and how they were advertised.
 

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Personally, I have no idea why leather would be incorporated into wading boots 'in this day and age'. Perusing the Patagonia web site, the promise is for boots 'for a lifetime'- the provisor being that 'imported parts' are used- would those be the leather parts, I do not know.

If leather is insisted on for wading boots, suitably prepared leather is key. Note what was on offer from Hardy's during 1937...canvas and 'special oak bark tanned russet- hide, leather'..
Malcolm

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True on being able to repair them. But $150-250 bucks to repair your boots that cost about $299 new now might be hard to justify for some. Or when other high end wading boots are out there for less

I think I just expected a little more repair/warranty coverage for the price and how they were advertised.

Leather has the advantage that it can be re-shaped and stretched to a good degree. I know there are simple tools and techniques used to do this type of thing you could research. But I would first get them reconditioned with the waterproofing and then stuff the toes with something tightly. I bet if they started out as an ok fit they will go back there. But in a pinch I’d consult your local cobbler before taking Danner/Paragonia up on their repair “deal”.
 

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K-Roc
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I've got a couple pairs of them, the River Salts for wet wading and the Foot Tractors for wadering up. Mine were massive so actually if they shrunk a bit it wouldn't be a big deal.
I've noticed my previous G3 Simms boots shrink a lot too when they dry out, painful to put on but then great after a few minutes in the water.
 

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The danner boots are the worst wading boots out there! Zero ankle support no arch support,heavy as all hell and cost wayyyyy to much! If you are into hiking a river for a days fishing then don’t get this boot if you roll up to the run and step out of a boat and walk the length of the run then there fine. I really miss the old Simms g3! If anyone has a size 10 in like new condition let me know! 😂
 

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Yes, I was wondering about whether either Patagonia or Danner had anything explicit about waterproofing - which is really just souped up “polishing” in the end. But I guess the downsides of abuse are just a lot more dramatic with wading boots.

My handmade hiking boots, made by the same guy, were closer to $1800! He is one of the few people in the U.S. that is both a Master Bootmaker and and expert on orthotics. I needed custom because of a surgically fused ankle joint, but at that price you really pay attention to taking care of them. He made me wading boots as well, but I think those will be his last pair. Relative to regular one-shape-fits-all shoes those hiking boots feel like a beautiful woman is massaging your feet whenever you walk around. I’m very jealous of people who are lucky enough to be able to find a good fit commercially.

But he assured me the way to take care of both was exactly the same - with stuff I mentioned above, and that they can potentially last for a lifetime if properly cared for. Note that the shoes can easily be resoled and repaired - you don’t throw stuff like that out until you can no longer repair them. I assume the Danners would last a super long time as well if you kept them waterproofed and replaced the outsoles when they wore down.
I love my old Danner River Grippers no experience with the Patagonia River tractors. I spoke with the Recrafting dept at Danner a few weeks back and they recommended treating their boots with Lexol, to keep them soft and looking good. Just an FYI.
 

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K-Roc
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If you actually own and have used a pair of the Danners, they offer more ankle support than you think. You do them up tight and they are very supportive and I walk probably 10 plus kms a day and they are great. They certainly need a break in period.
I think people are missing the point on the whole rebuild offer that Danner has. They're not going to need it for 5 or ten years of hard use. At that point you can either rebuild them or throw them in the trash pile like we do with everything else we own.
 
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