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Discussion Starter #1
I have a nextcast coastal that I cut down to fit my rod and would like to weld some running line to the end to create a new loop. The back end of the coastal + 2 pieces of running line on either side of it make a pretty thick section and the large sized tubing I have from Rio doesn't stand a chance.

Curious what size (and ratio) tubing folks have been using for a similar situation.

thanks
 

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Dom
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You can taper your line VERY nicely by using this method Ive tried. You want to do this outside for obvious reasons:

1. Chuck thick end in electric drill
2. Attach other end of the head with few swivels to help take the twist out during the process
3. Hold and run the drill so the line is tight and use a dremel with a fine stone tool to taper the line
4. Use a long piece of shrink tubbing and "heal" the taper you made so its smooth
5. Now that you have a fine tapered end you can weld your loop.

Try it. Why introduce a possible failure point by using running line? Might mant to practice on some old lines to get a hang of it but thats how I taper my thick ends for welding loops. One could make a one off head with a steady hand. Of course... you can use exacto blade and taper it down but the end result even tho works well I couldnt get it thin enough without exposing the core. Your line wil rot if you leave the core exposed.
 

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Dom
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Oh... and I cant stress this enough... use Aquasure or Aquaseal to lightly coat your loop. PVC welds without some form of "jacket" eventually all fail, especially on thin lines. PU is a different story.
 

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JD
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This brand and this stuff. Just maybe one size up. Works great with the wife’s ceramic curling iron.
Note the bottom of the card says NTE electronics. Find an electrical supply store near you. They sell all different sizes of shrink tubing in 3 ft sections, cheap, & it's clear, so you can see how the weld looks before cutting it off.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
You can taper your line VERY nicely by using this method Ive tried. You want to do this outside for obvious reasons:

1. Chuck thick end in electric drill
2. Attach other end of the head with few swivels to help take the twist out during the process
3. Hold and run the drill so the line is tight and use a dremel with a fine stone tool to taper the line
4. Use a long piece of shrink tubbing and "heal" the taper you made so its smooth
5. Now that you have a fine tapered end you can weld your loop.

So you are essentially turning your line on lathe? Interesting. What about longer lines? Can you get them taught enough to put enough pressure?
 

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Dom
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So you are essentially turning your line on lathe? Interesting. What about longer lines? Can you get them taught enough to put enough pressure?
Yes. Lathe principle. Have not yet tried anything longer than a shooting head but IMO extra lenght would even help. Run your drill in reverse once in a while. I could only get my taper at first few feet as I was doing this alone with drill in my hand but if you have a helper or a way to clamp your drill you could probably taper the whole damn thing :saevilw:
 

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I have a nextcast coastal that I cut down to fit my rod and would like to weld some running line to the end to create a new loop. The back end of the coastal + 2 pieces of running line on either side of it make a pretty thick section and the large sized tubing I have from Rio doesn't stand a chance.

Curious what size (and ratio) tubing folks have been using for a similar situation.

thanks
You might have flyline scraps that could be spliced in-place of a loop? Maybe a back taper with some length of running section?
 

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Yes. Lathe principle. Have not yet tried anything longer than a shooting head but IMO extra lenght would even help. Run your drill in reverse once in a while. I could only get my taper at first few feet as I was doing this alone with drill in my hand but if you have a helper or a way to clamp your drill you could probably taper the whole damn thing :saevilw:
You can get a nice taper with a blade too, and once it's melted, it smooths out.

The trick with a blade is a new, sharp blade, and to draw the line under it, rather than try and push the blade along the line. Work on a smooth surface, trap the line between the lade and the surface, and put the point of the blade on the surface to act as a pivot point. Start the blade at the point you want the taper to start, then draw back slowly, carving a slip of line way. Adjusting the angle of the blade, and changing it out when it starts staging rather than slicing, you will quickly get to the point where you can take onion-skin then slices, to as heavy as you want. You can make multiple trims, or adjust the depth of the cut as you draw the line towards you.I prefer to cut opposite sides from one another, one after another, and then turn int 90º, trim
opposites, then halve that, and trim opposite sides, and keep at it till you have a nice taper. Whole deal takes less time than to change the blade in your knife.. A couples pieces of practice line and you'll be feeling like a samurai.
 
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