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This actually relates to the "adding sink to my shooting head" thread....

I was working with my Torridge today, practicing with a 10ft sinking leader. For a while, I had a 3' mono "compensator" on (as suggested by Fredaevens on the other thread) , but it really threw everything off (in spite of my reporting otherwise on the other thread). I removed that and enjoyed some improvement, but still couldn't get a reliably smooth turnover. Mike K. reminded me that the density of the fly line needs to be greater than the density of the leader, which is what I suspect is going on. Cutting the line back to a denser point might be the answer--has anybody done this, specifically with the Snowbee 44' scandi heads? I'm also intrigued by the notion of cutting that head so I can attach my 5wt sink tips to it...

I may find myself buying a grain wt. scale....

Thanks!

Tom
 

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Indicators Anonymous
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pcknshvl said:
Mike K. reminded me that the density of the fly line needs to be greater than the density of the leader, which is what I suspect is going on.
the density of the sinking leader will always be greater then the flyline, no matter how far you cut it back. a floating line floats because it is less dense then water (p<1.0), a sinking line or sinking leader sinks because it is denser then water (and the sinkrate is determined by just how much denser then water it is).

however, it is the mass that is key. for solid smooth turnover, in most cases, the floating line needs to contain more mass then the sinking section (grains/foot for example). as the mass of a dryline goes up, so must its diameter to compensate for the additonal mass and minimize the density (p<1.0).
 
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