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Discussion Starter #1
Seeing the end of a black sink tip, that point where the leader joins the line, is beyond difficult for me, even in smooth water.

Do any of you have methods to overcome this? Paint? Tape?
 

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baldmountain said:
How about tying 6" or so of florescent red Amnesia between the end of the fly line and leader. Or maybe using it to make your leader loop?
I've seen this done (acts "almost like" an indicator too) a couple of times. Only thing I'd 'change' from the above is to use a brighter colour than green. This (dark/late in the day) blends back into black ... yellow maybe?
 

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He said

the point where the leader joins the line. That is more difficult with tips. Also, I guess I do not watch the anchor closely enough. My floating bellys are bright enough the connection to the tip is easy to see and when I get better than half way up the sinking tip I start forward. Someone have a better idea?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I apologize for the incomplete question.

When executing a Spey back cast with a black sink tip line, seeing the line-leader connection "splash" as a signal to start the forward cast has challenged me from day one. Ditto seeing the tip "pirouette" in a double Spey.

The brightly colored floating lines are so easy to see, by comparison.

Has anyone highlighted the end of his or her sink tip line?
 

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Coast2coast Flyfishaholic
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Good question Bob -

I've found the same to be true but it hasn't been too troublesome of late because I look for the rearward 'slide' of the line to indicate proper tension and preparedness for takeoff on the forward cast.

With proper tension on the d-loop I can even see the fly sliding on occasion. This little trick has not only helped with the anchor visibility but has ensured that I have "filled the sail" completely in the d-loop and have a good chance of making a strong forward cast.

Peter Anderson says "lead before speed", few wiser words could be spoken for Spey casting. A good 'slide' to start the cast makes the cast smoother, without the whip effect, and reduces turbulence in the loop. A slide is a good thing as the start of a cast should have low acceleration, increasing of course to the stop point.

I find that the pirouette of the line on a double spey or snap-T provides the same indication on the water's surface.

If you fish at night maybe a luminous braid connector (charged with a flashlight) would serve a dual purpose ;)
 

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Target

for the fish? What would a blue do?
 
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